Entrapment Neuropathy…Pain By Any Other Name

Entrapment Neuropathy…Pain By Any Other Name

 


Ever heard of carpal tunnel syndrome?

Repetitive motion disorder?

Nerve compression syndrome?

How about a “trapped nerve”?

Chances are, you’ve probably heard of at least one of these conditions.

These medical conditions are entrapment neuropathies.

Entrapment neuropathies or compression neuropathies are a type of peripheral neuropathy caused by direct pressure on one nerve.  The pressure can be caused by trauma or injury to the specific nerve, repetitive use of a specific part of the body, a cast or brace that doesn’t fit properly or just frequently sitting with your arm over the back of a chair.

If you’re experiencing[1]

–           A burning or stinging pain in one part of your body

–           Tingling

–           Numbness

–           Muscle weakness

You could be suffering from entrapment neuropathy.  To avoid permanent nerve damage, you need to see a doctor immediately, like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician, for proper diagnosis and treatment.

What Exactly Causes Entrapment Neuropathy?

You might be wondering why something as simple as sitting with your elbows on the table all the time can cause entrapment neuropathy for you but your Uncle Harry worked in a coal mine for 40 years swinging a pick axe and never had a problem with his arms, back or anything else.

Entrapment neuropathy occurs when some kind of external pressure disrupts the flow of blood through vessels that supply specific nerves.[2] This oxygen starvation can sometimes occur because of internal problems as well such as lesions, cysts or tumors or even substantial weight gain. When this happens over and over again, the nerve is starved of its oxygen supply and becomes damaged and eventually scarred.  Once this happens, it no longer functions properly.

If you have a chronic condition like diabetes[3] that already compromises your blood flow, the fact that Uncle Harry never had these issues and you do is probably more indicative of your overall physical condition than genetics.  Your body is just more susceptible to this type of injury.  You need to be more mindful of how you move and use whichever part of your body is affected.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Diagnose Entrapment Neuropathy?

The symptoms you report will vary depending upon which part of your body is affected by entrapment neuropathy.  Your condition will probably start with tingling or pain in the nerves followed by loss of sensation or numbness.  Muscle weakness will be the last to develop and usually occurs because the muscles have atrophied due to lack of use (i.e., your hand hurts so you stop using it as much).

Entrapment or compression neuropathy can usually be diagnosed based on symptoms.  Be sure you keep a good record of when and how your symptoms started.

Your NeuropathyDR® clinician will probably use nerve conduction studies to confirm the diagnosis and rule out the involvement of other nerves.  If entrapment neuropathy is suspected, your health care provider will then order an MRI to determine which nerve is damaged, how badly and to see if an internal issue such as a tumor or cyst is putting pressure on the nerve.

It is vitally important that you choose a health care provider with the clinical skills and experience to recognize your symptoms for what they are and distinguish them from other diseases.  Entrapment neuropathies can mimic other conditions and vice versa. The longer it takes to get the appropriate diagnosis and treatment, like the treatment protocol used exclusively by NeuropathyDR® clinicians, the more likely you are to have permanent nerve damage.

Treating Entrapment Neuropathy

If your NeuropathyDR® clinician determines that an underlying medical issue is causing your entrapment neuropathy, such as a tumor, cyst, inflammation or even weight gain, steps will be taken to first treat that condition.

If a tumor or cyst is the underlying problem, surgery may be ordered to remove the growth.  If you have issues with inflammation or weight gain, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will work with you to design a weight loss program and nutrition plan to resolve either of these issues.

The nutrition counseling provided by your NeuropathyDR® clinician is part of an overall lifestyle modification plan that will help you control your weight and increase your physical activity, within your abilities, to reduce the likelihood of your entrapment neuropathy causing permanent nerve damage or recurring once your immediate problem is taken care of.

In concert with these two steps to treat your entrapment neuropathy, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will also prescribe manual manipulation to readjust your skeletal structure and nerve pathways and nerve stimulation therapy to assist your damaged nerve in healing and open up the flow of blood to help the nerves repair themselves.

All of these steps are integral parts of the exclusive NeuropathyDR® designed specifically for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including entrapment neuropathies in all its forms.

For more information on coping with entrapment neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Want a Better Outcome? Get Involved!

Want a Better Outcome? Get Involved!

Managing Your Care And Your Expectations

 

Once you’ve made a list of the answers to the questions we talked about in our last post, you’re ready for your appointment.

Be prepared to make the most efficient use of your time with your health professional.  Most doctor’s offices schedule appointments in 15 minute increments so be ready to hit the ground running when you have face time with your physician.

To do that, you need to:

  • Take control of your time.  If your doctor doesn’t have time to fully answer the questions you have, ask for someone who can.  Many practices have physician’s assistants or nurse practitioners who can tell you what you need to know.
  • Make sure you understand exactly what your doctor is telling you.  If you don’t, say so.  If you want a good outcome, you have to know what you can and can’t do.
  • Write down whatever your doctor tells you about your condition, any medications he’s prescribing and any lifestyle changes you need to make.
  • Review what you write down with your doctor.  Make sure that what you understood him to say is really what he said.
  • Set realistic goals for your treatment. Make sure that your doctor understands exactly what you want to achieve.  Do you want to heal? Do you just want to manage your condition?  Do you only want to know how to deal with a new medical symptom?  Your goals will help your doctor determine how to treat you.

Taking these steps will help you manage your own care and your expectations for what you can realistically achieve through treatment.

Recovered From Your Surgery But Having New Symptoms?

Recovered From Your Surgery But Having New Symptoms?

Great news! Your recent surgery was a success…

You came through recovery like a champ…

You managed to avoid any infections and you’re back home.

You never expected to be experiencing symptoms you never had before surgery:

  • Tingling and/or burning in hands and feet
  • Pain in your nerves
  • Loss of the sense of touch or an inability to feel vibration
  • Temperature changes in the flesh – do your extremities feel excessively warm or cold?
  • Side effects from pain medication that cause insomnia or difficulty staying asleep

Almost makes you wonder if the surgery was worth it sometimes, doesn’t it?

What Could Be Causing Your Problems?

"Why can't I fell my feet after surgery?"

 

One cause could be a condition called hypoxia.  Hypoxia can result from prolonged exposure to anesthesia used during major surgical procedures.  The anesthetic used can lead to certain nerves not receiving the amount of oxygen they need to function and that can cause nerve damage. When a surgical procedure is required, the possibility of nerve damage due to oxygen deprivation can be a necessary evil.

Another possibility could be free radical damage caused by toxins.  This sometimes happens in chemotherapy patients.  They make it through chemo and survive cancer only to be faced with the pain associated with nerve damage. Granted, when you’re facing down cancer, pain associated with nerve damage is the least of your problems but it can really make your post-chemo life miserable.

Yet another cause could be nerve compression from things like sciatica or carpal tunnel syndrome.  If your surgery was for either of those conditions or some other condition caused by nerves being pinched or squeezed, your symptoms could be left over damage from pre-surgical conditions.

Next time, we’ll talk about what you need to do next to treat these painful symptoms and get your life back.

What You Need To Know About Metabolic Syndrome

Think You May Have Metabolic Syndrome?

If any of the symptoms or conditions we spoke about in our last post apply to you, talk to your doctor about testing to make sure you don’t have the others before they cause serious health problems.

If you’re not sure what to ask your doctor, here are some basic questions:

  • Are the symptoms I’m experiencing now related to metabolic syndrome or some other condition?
  • What kinds of tests do I need to best manage my conditions?
  • What else can I do to improve my health?
  • What other options do I have to manage the conditions that cause metabolic syndrome?
  • How do best manage all of these conditions together?
  • What restrictions do I need to follow?
  • Should I see a specialist?
  • Where can I get more information on metabolic syndrome or any of the conditions I currently have?

One More Thing to Think About

We’re seeing more and more metabolic syndrome in younger patient populations.  And one of the first symptoms they experience is peripheral neuropathy.  Because nerve tissues are especially vulnerable to damage from diseases that affect the body’s ability to transform nutrients into energy or produce some of the components of cell repair (think diabetes), nerve damage and the resulting peripheral neuropathy is very common.

Classic symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are:

  • Tingling and/or burning in hands and feet
  • Neuralgic-like pains
  • Loss of the sense of touch or an inability to feel vibration
  • Temperature changes in the flesh – do your extremities feel excessively warm or cold?
  • Serious sleep disturbances with resultant depression or side effects from pain medication

If you have a confirmed diagnosis of metabolic syndrome and are now experiencing any of these symptoms, you don’t have to just live with it.  Contact us today for information on how peripheral neuropathy can be treated, your suffering lessened and exactly how to find a NeuropathyDR in your area.

Neuropathy and Chronic Pain – The Causes: Lumbar Trauma and High Blood Pressure Medication

Neuropathy and Chronic Pain – The Causes: Lumbar Trauma and High Blood Pressure Medication

Lumbar Trauma: Trauma to the lumbar area of the back can be another cause of neuropathy and chronic pain.  This trauma can be as slight as lifting a bag of groceries out of the trunk, picking up a grandchild, or bending down to tie a shoe.  Our studies show a 60% correlation between repeated injuries to the lower back and subsequent development of neuropathy and chronic pain symptoms.

During the acute phase of localized trauma, inflammation develops reducing arterial and venous blood to the lumbar synaptic junctions.  Nerves in the region temporarily shrink due to the reduction in activity.  Since the body tends to conserve resources, the affected nerves begin to atrophy, the synaptic junction gap begins to widen, and synaptic minerals leech away making signal transmission more difficult.

Chiropractic Care is part of this powerful program

Signals of normal strength can no longer cross synapses that are damaged by the reduction in blood flow.  The loss of signals across the synapses compounds the process of deterioration. Muscle atrophy and a host of other problems follow.  We have found that a signal delivered at 7.83 cycles per second (the body’s natural electromagnetic resonant frequency) and at an amplitude approximately 10 times that originally required will cross these enlarged synapses, repolarize them.

High Blood Pressure Medication: High blood pressure medication not only lowers blood pressure, it also reduces the ability of the arterial blood to refill the veins.  This vacancy results as the venous muscle pumps the blood back to the heart.  When this occurs the blood has a tendency to pool in the lower extremities; the nerves and synaptic junctions do not have enough necessary nutrition and oxygen to maintain their health resulting in nerve cell atrophy, loss of mineralization, and conductivity of the synaptic junctions as explained above.

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