Did You Inherit Your Neuropathy?

Did You Inherit Your Neuropathy?


 

Chances are, if you’re reading this and you’re already in your late 20’s or early 30’s (or older) and you have [1]

•      Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

•      Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP)

•      Dejerine-Sottas Disease (DSD)

•      Hereditary Motor Neuropathy (HMN)

You were probably diagnosed in your teens or possibly earlier.  But if you or someone you know is in their teens (or younger) and they have a combination of the following symptoms:

•      Numbness

•      Tingling

•      Pain in their feet and hands

•      Weakness and loss of muscle mass (especially in their calves or lower legs and feet)

•      Impaired sweating

•      Insensitivity to pain

•      Foot deformities such as hammer toes or high arches

•      Scoliosis (curvature of the spine)

It might be time to do some genetic testing to determine if they have a form of hereditary neuropathy.

 

What is Hereditary Neuropathy?

Hereditary neuropathies are inherited disorders that affect the peripheral nervous system, often resulting in peripheral neuropathy.  Hereditary neuropathies can affect you in many different ways but they are usually grouped into four different categories[2]:

•      Motor and sensory neuropathy – affecting movement and the ability to feel sensations

•      Sensory neuropathy – affecting the senses

•      Motor neuropathy – affecting the ability to move

•      Sensory and autonomic neuropathy – affecting the ability to feel sensation and the autonomic nervous system (the system that controls your ability to sweat, your heart rate, your body’s ability to regulate your blood pressure, your digestion, etc.)

As the names imply, they are classified based on exactly which nerves are affected and which functions are impaired.

The most common form of hereditary neuropathy is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (a motor and sensory neuropathy)  affecting 1 out of every 2500 people.  Most people with CMT are diagnosed before they reach their 20’s but their symptoms can begin years earlier.  CMT may take a while to diagnose because the symptoms can wax and wane over a period of years.

How Can I Find Out if I Have Hereditary Neuropathy?

The only way to diagnose hereditary neuropathy is through blood tests for genetic testing, nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsies.   If you’ve been diagnosed without going through any of these tests, you probably don’t have a good diagnosis.

Your doctor should take a very thorough history and physical.  In order to really determine if you are at risk for hereditary neuropathy, you need to look as far back as three generations.  However, a word to the wise, even if you hereditary neuropathy has not shown up in your family previously, all inherited diseases have to start somewhere.  You could just be the person starting it in your family.   That makes genetic testing even more important.

Are Hereditary Neuropathies Curable?

 

There are no cures for the various types of hereditary neuropathies.  Treatment is usually to treat the symptoms and give your body the support it needs to function as normally as possible.  That usually means physical and occupational therapy,  as well as

•      Care and correction for your muscular and skeletal systems

•      Treatment for any other underlying medical problems

•      Nutrition education and diet planning

•      A step by step exercise regimen

•      Medication as needed or necessary

A highly skilled medical professional well versed in diagnosing and treating nerve damage is your best place to start for treatment of your Hereditary Neuropathy.  An excellent place to start is with a NeuropathyDr® clinician.  They have had great success in treating patients with hereditary neuropathy in all its various forms.

If you have a confirmed diagnosis of Hereditary Neuropathy or think you may have it, seek treatment now.  While you can’t be cured, you can take steps to treat and lessen your symptoms and greatly improve your quality of life.  Contact us today for information on how your Hereditary Neuropathy can be treated, your suffering lessened and exactly how to find a NeuropathyDr® in your area.

 

NeuropathyDR™ Clinics Advise Exercising With Caution – Part 1

NeuropathyDR™ Clinics Advise Exercising With Caution – Part 1

In our last few posts we’ve talked at length about the virtues of regular exercise for helping with the symptoms of

·           Diabetic neuropathy

·           Peripheral neuropathy

·           Diabetes

·           Post-chemotherapy neuropathy

·           Autonomic neuropathy

But what we haven’t addressed is that, depending upon what part of your you’re your neuropathy affects, you may need to modify your exercise routine to keep from developing some more serious problems.

Here are a few things to consider when designing your exercise routine:

First, ALWAYS talk to your doctor before you begin any exercise program. Ask him or her to do a complete examination of your feet and lets to make sure that you don’t have serious problems lurking that exercise may aggravate.  If you do, get those under control before you start.

Precautions for Your Feet When Exercising

Make sure that your shoes are fitted properly to protect you from injury.

If your feet have nerve damage, don’t do any type of exercise that requires repetitive weight bearing – like jogging or step aerobics.  That type of activity can cause ulcers or even fractures if you suffer from neuropathy in your feet and/or legs.

Always wear polyester or poly/cotton blend socks to keep your feet dry when you exercise.  Invest in some good socks that will wick the moisture away from the skin.  And even better- the new microfibers.

Managing Your Nerve Pain – Part 3 About Those Supplements

Managing Your Nerve Pain – Part 3 About Those Supplements

 

So…

You’re walking…

Getting more exercise…

Paying special attention to the condition of your feet…

Here are a few more things to do to help you manage your nerve pain and ensure a good outcome from your course of treatment  for neuropathy:

About Taking Targeted Supplements

Vitamins B-1, B-12, B-6 and folic acid are all vital to healthy nerves. We have found certain combinations in professionally tailored packages for each case often works best.  If you eat a healthy diet, you may still not be getting the recommended daily amount of some vitamins and other nutrients. Talk to your doctor first, though, before you take any supplements to make sure they won’t interact badly with the medications you’re taking.

You can easily check for drug-nutrient interactions.

Special caution is advised in thyroid disease and cancer therapies during neuropathy care.

Control Your Alcohol Intake

High intake of alcohol is a toxin to your nerves.  And if the nerves are already damaged, it’s even worse.  Some people think that a drink a day is good for your health. I respectfully disagree. If you have nerve damage, that’s a chance you don’t need to take.  Don’t drink more than four alcoholic beverages a week if you suffer from peripheral neuropathy, and none would be even better

That’s Why NeuropathyDR™ Doctors and Physical Therapists are trained

Before you begin any self-care regimen or add supplements, herbs or vitamins to your healthcare regimen, always talk to your professional first.  Virtually everything has some side effects so make sure that what you’re planning to take won’t cause you more harm than good.

And Above All Else…

Don’t give up.  Self-care is vital to managing your neuropathy.  While you may need a combination of these self-care tips and medication, sorting out yourself is not always wise.

Contact a local NeuropathyDR™ doctor or physical therapist to explore treatment options in addition to taking care of yourself.

And if you can’t find one in your area yet, contact my team at 781 659-7989

 

More Clinics are being added every week!

Managing Your Nerve Pain – Part 2

Managing Your Nerve Pain – Part 2

As part of our continuing discussion on self-help for managing your nerve pain if you have peripheral neuropathy, here are a couple of more tips:

Walk, or Better Yet Cycle As Much As Possible

You don’t have to run a marathon or even walk one.  You don’t have to race a titanium frame bicycle. Just move the big muscles in your legs as often and as much as you possibly can.  Exercise, even very gently at first improves circulation and improved blood flow to the legs and feet will help nourish damaged nerves.

A Warm Bath Can Do Wonders

Warm baths increase blood flow; reduce stress and aid in relaxation.  All three of these benefits will make the pain a little easier to tolerate.  But a word to the wise, check the water temperature with your elbow or your wrist before you get in the bathtub. The nerve damage in your feet makes them an unreliable source for judging temperature. Use a thermometer. We like 100 degrees Fahrenheit with some added minerals and antioxidants.

Managing Your Nerve Pain – Part 1

Managing Your Nerve Pain – Part 1

If you have diabetes…

Or you’ve had shingles…

Even if you’ve completed a successful course of chemotherapy…

And you suffer from pain or burning in your feet, legs or hands, you could have peripheral neuropathy.

You’re not alone…

You don’t have to just live with it…

You don’t necessarily have to swallow more pills and pay for more expensive prescriptions…

There are things you can do to help manage your pain.

More than half the people suffering from neuropathy report that they’ve tried some complementary treatments in addition to traditional medicine to relieve their pain.

There are many things you can do daily at home to help you improve your pain.  Here are few to think about:

If You Have Diabetic Neuropathy, Control Your Blood Sugar

This may sound like a no-brainer but many people with diabetes don’t realize how toxic high blood sugar is.  High blood sugar is what causes nerve pain and damage.  Keeping blood sugar levels close to normal can not only stop ongoing damage; some damage may even be reversible.  That provides even more promise for fighting neuropathy pain.

Take Care of Your Feet

Nerve pain is usually what brings people in to see their doctors.  But the numbness in their feet and inability to feel even the smallest injury can lead to infections and ulceration and ultimately end in amputation.   If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy you need to take special care of your feet and be very aware of any sign of problems.  Some things you can do are:

  • Clean and inspect your feet every day.  If you have an injury that’s not healing properly, call your doctor immediately.
  • Wear comfortable shoes.  Don’t wear shoes that pinch your toes or rub blisters on your heels.
  • Wear padded socks to cushion the ball of your feet and the heel.
  • Either cut your toenails straight across or have a doctor do it for you.

Next time, we’ll give you a few more things you can do to help manage your nerve pain to ensure a good outcome with your prescribed treatment.  Always ask your NeuropathyDr trained professional what you can do to improve your outcome.