Vitamin D and Dementia

Vitamin D and Dementia

Recent research highlights the relationship between vitamin D and dementia. Turns out maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D may help prevent the onset of brain disease commonly called dementia. Even the news media has latched onto this one. Vitamin D is associated with many diseases and conditions including dementia.

As it turns out and as we have long suspected vitamin D is critical for brain health.

But what about its involvement with neuropathy and chronic pain? Over the last few years we have highlighted it’s role, and the fact that vitamin D deficiencies are associated with chronic pain.

Furthermore vitamin D deficiencies are often associated with peripheral neuropathy.

Often times there is no direct cause and effect noted but we do know that vitamin D deficiency is associated with chronic poor health and many diseases and illnesses.

But why is this? How can one nutrient have such profound effects? The reason is vitamin acts as a hormone. Also acts as a cellular protectant.

One mistake that too many make however is simply blindly taking vitamin D without having it’s blood levels measured. This is a point I cannot stress enough.

You must know your vitamin D levels like you know your height ,weight and blood pressure.

So why not learn more about how vitamin D may help protect you from dementia, as well as numerous other disorders, including neuropathy as well as many forms of chronic pain!

Just use the search function on his site and go through our archives and learn much more about vitamin D!

There’s no other way to say it.

This should be part of routine testing for all patients, no excuses.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at https://neuropathydr.com

Why Carb Control Can Help Neuropathy, Fibromyalgia, and Many Forms of Chronic Pain

Carrying excess body fat can elevate blood sugars and triglycerides over time. Even mildly elevated blood sugars can cause some of these sugars to attach to protein molecules, causing chronic pain.

As a regular reader of these posts, you understand—in part, at least—the importance of controlling carbohydrates in our diets.

There are two forms of carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates include things like refined sugar, which is commonly contained in cookies, cakes, sodas, ice cream, etc. You probably also know that these items are forbidden on the NeuropathyDR Diet Plan!

There are also complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are manly starches like those found in fruits, vegetables, and grains.

The most dangerous part of high carbohydrate consumption is that it simply causes us to gain weight unnecessarily. The mechanism by which this happens is relatively complex.

In a nutshell, high carbohydrate consumption causes our bodies to produce excess insulin. Production of extra insulin actually causes a number of things to occur, but the most important is lowering of blood sugar by driving excess calories into fat cells.

This is how excess carbohydrates in our diet causes us to gain weight, seemingly very rapidly.

Another factor which many patients are unaware of is carrying excess body fat can elevate blood sugars and triglycerides over time. Even mildly elevated blood sugars can cause some of these sugars to attach to protein molecules. This is responsible for making us feel very stiff and sore.

This also makes it more difficult for our bodies to regulate insulin levels.

Of course, this response is dramatically altered in patients who are diabetic, creating all types of dangerous health effects, including eye disease, kidney disease, and of course peripheral neuropathy and other forms of chronic pain.

The good news is, pre-diabetes and borderline diabetes can often be controlled—and sometimes reversed—by improving the quality of diet.

The sooner we spring into action, the better our chances of impacting our current and future health.

There are, however, two circumstances in which higher carbohydrate consumption maybe needed.

Number one, is if you take insulin. If you take insulin, you need to know that changing your diet, and certain dietary supplementation, especially with thiamine or vitamin B1, can influence your blood sugar and insulin requirements. That’s why need to work very carefully with prescribing healthcare professionals.

Also, if you are an athlete in training, you will need to consume more carbohydrates than average. To avoid excess weight gain, avoid overeating, and emphasize the complex carbohydrates, such as those contained in fruit and vegetables, as opposed to simple sugars.

Also try to confine higher carbohydrate consumption to within one hour before, and perhaps after, strenuous physical activity.

 

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part II

Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part II

Your local NeuropathyDR® specialist can help you understand Chemotherapy Neuropathy Treatments

Last time, we talked about some therapies that can help alleviate chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The precise combination of these complementary therapies in NeuropathyDR® protocol can bring relief from your peripheral neuropathy and put you back on the road to a full life.

Nutrition

As a cancer patient, you’re already familiar with the effects chemotherapy and other treatments can have on your digestive system. The side effects of cancer treatment can not only affect your ability to eat but they can also prevent your body from getting the nutrition you need to heal.

If you have cancer, you need to make sure you’re getting enough nutrients to prevent or reverse nutritional shortfalls, lessen the side effects of treatment and improve your quality of life.

If at all possible, you need to make sure you’re eating enough high calorie, high-protein foodto give your body proper nutrition. But sitting down and eating a big meal may not be possible. Try eating small meals or snacks frequently instead. Frequent small meals will give your body a steady supply of nutrients, be easier for your sensitive digestive system to handle and maintain a consistent blood sugar level. All of this will often make you feel much better.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician to discuss a meal plan that will give your body what it needs to repair the damage done by cancer treatment. Good nutrition will boost your immune system and let it do its job in fighting off illnesses brought on by the damage of chemotherapy.

NeuropathyDR® practitioners often use diet plans and our nutrition guidelines to complement their chiropractic and NDGen treatment protocols to treat the whole patient from the inside out.

Nerve Stimulation (Neurostimulation or NeuroStim)

Once a NeuropathyDR® course of treatment has been designed and a nutrition plan established, the final piece in the overall treatment of your post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy treatment plan is nerve stimulation.

There are several nerve stimulation techniques to help peripheral neuropathy patients. Our protocol that is having great success includes the NDGen Family of Neurostimulation Devices.

By employing electrical stimulation to the nerves, in a wave-like low frequency motion the nerves may be stimulated to heal wherever possible. This specialty treatment allows the nerves to communicate more normally again and that, in itself, seems to start the process of reversing some damage of peripheral neuropathy.

You may watch our Cancer Patients speak out at http://YouTube.com/NeuropathyDoctor

The combination of good NeuropathyDR® in-clinic care, nutrition and NDGen nerve stimulation and Laser/LED Therapy is showing great promise in helping post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients return to a pain free life, without the debilitating effects of post-chemotherapy peripheral  neuropathy.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

 

Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy

Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy

Diabetes and neuropathy nutrition should include a dairy free diet

There is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. Significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

In one of our recent articles, we spent some substantial time talking about dairy consumption, and its negative effects on human health. As I said previously, these are not popular statements—but so be it.

The fact of the matter is, the scientific evidence is overwhelming. Human beings are probably far better without dairy consumption than with it.

What you may not be aware of is there is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. You may know, significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

Also, dairy contains insulin-like growth factor which is a promoter of several different cancers, including breast and prostate cancer. Even stronger is the connection between a particular milk sugar called galactose and the development of ovarian cancer.

But more than this, 50% or more of the population has difficulty digesting milk. It is responsible for allergies, indigestion, as well as elevation in cholesterol and so-called “bad” fats.

All politics aside, let’s help the consumer understand the link between milk consumption and health. We often find that patients who do a dairy and gluten-free diet have significant reductions in both pain and inflammation.

Of course, this influences many patients with neuropathy, and, indeed, many forms of chronic pain.

The simplest way to make a dietary shift is to do so gradually. Give yourself time to explore alternatives such as almond, coconut, and rice-based products.

Like everything else, some are far better than others. Be careful of any product with added sugars. Also, many patients find thickeners such as carrageenan to be very irritating to the G.I. tract.

Of course, I encourage you to do your own research—do your homework. Unfortunately, the influence of the dairy industry is very wide. The spillover into classic nutrition, in which I was trained, is also great.

Keep in mind: in a short period of time, you could know more about dairy and human health than your doctor.

So what’s the answer? Share with them. Provide them a copy of The China Study.

Above all, remain diligent to other dietary assaults. They have a tremendous impact upon your health, well-being—and, yes, your neuropathy!

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin D

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin D

Your Neuropathy Nutrition and Diet Should include Vitamin D

Yes, and this essential vitamin has a role in many other disorders too. Vitamin D is a key nutrient, responsible for many essential functions in human body.

What’s the Connection?

Perhaps the most significant functions are maintenance of bone mass and a powerful immune system. The more recent research suggests many additional roles for this key nutrient. We now know that when Vitamin D levels are low, widespread aches and pains plus more illnesses like flus and colds are common.

Yes, and maybe even neuropathy, both directly and indirectly.

Regarding infections, some researchers suggest we should be heading out vitamin D tablets as opposed to flu shots as they probably would be so much more effective, with minimal side effects.

But that’s another story for another time.

The neuropathy Vitamin D connection probably is because Vitamin D is necessary for the body to manufacture some key neurotropic factors.

Neurotropins as they are often called are substances produced by the body to help nerves repair, and whenever possible regenerate.

There are a number different things that can influence your own neurotropin production, including key nutrition components and therapies like low-frequency nerve stimulation.

In fact, the research is so significant here I am “bullish” on neurostimulator kits being tried for most neuropathy and pain patients.

This is why our homecare kits have become a very popular choice and work well the vast majority of the time. If you are new to Beating Neuropathy can find these at NeuropathyDR

So how much vitamin D is enough?

Well, United States says around 600 international units per day is fine, but European countries recommend levels much higher, on the order of a few thousand international units per day for most healthy adults.

So who is correct? I would definitely side with Europeans on this because research supports that most people do not get nearly enough vitamin D either from their diet, or sunlight exposure.

Personally, I recommend a minimum of 2500 units of supplemental Vitamin D per day combined with The NeuropathyDR Diet.

There are unfortunately no good plant sources of active vitamin D. (cholecaliferol).

The best dietary sources of vitamin D come from fish and fish oils.

But the most important advice I will leave you with today is to have your baseline levels of vitamin D checked, you and your healthcare providers must then determine the most optimum dosage for YOU!

Retest after the first 90 days to make sure your body is absorbing this key neuropathy nutrient properly.

You also need to be very careful because vitamin D can be toxic in very large amounts.

To learn more, check back with us frequently as we will update you periodically as the research indicates.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

 

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

Your Neuropathy Nutrition Should include Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3, or niacin, is a nutrient that, like all vitamins, is essential to health, life and neuropathy nutrition. Vitamin B3 helps our bodies convert food into energy, burn fat properly, and is largely responsible for helping us feel energized!

Did you know that vitamin B3 is a common ingredient in energy drinks? The reason for this is simple. Without vitamin B3, or niacin, our body is unable to function. For many patients, it is lacking due to poor diet. Consuming a diet high in processed foods is likely to be low in niacin. Consuming alcohol can also lower vitamin B3 levels too.

In the neuropathy clinic, mild deficiencies of niacin are probably relatively common. Mild deficiencies probably show up in the neuropathy clinic as slowed metabolism.

Also very common are low levels of niacin, causing a decrease in tolerance to cold. This occurs in neuropathy and chronic pain patients too!

Niacin deficiency can cause the disease called pellagra. Pellagra is disease characterized by the three D’s: diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia.

In very severe niacin deficiencies, significant changes occur to the nervous system. These changes can show up as psychiatric symptoms and, as we mentioned earlier, dementia or brain disease.

More commonly, especially in modern society, are lower levels of niacin then are optimal, making worse some very common neuropathy treatment conditions, including high cholesterol and metabolic syndrome.

A proper neuropathy nutrition diet should include a good food sources of niacin include chicken, beef, and fish including tuna, salmon, and halibut. Many nuts are also high in niacin. Avocado and shiitake mushrooms are also high in niacin. Vitamin B3 as niacinamide is also a common ingredient in many multivitamins and other dietary supplements.

Since niacin is available in two different common forms (niacin and niacinamide), we recommend patients consume both forms in the same supplement.

The reason for this is they will tend to act somewhat differently, both having beneficial effects.

Measuring vitamin B3 levels requires a little more work than a simple blood test. Blood tests for niacin are often unreliable, so special urine tests need to be performed.

Like so many nutrients, it is important to remember that diet must be the number one method of obtaining proper nutrition. It is also critical to understand that each nutrient is just like a key instrument in a symphony.

And just like a symphony does not work when one instrument does not play properly, the same is true in nutrition–especially with neuropathy nutrition!

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.co

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