Allithiamine – Help Your Pain and Your Brain

Allithiamine – Help Your Pain and Your Brain

If you are ready to help your pain, then we’d like for you to meet allithiamine. You may be saying to yourself right now, “what in the heck is allithiamine?” Well, that’s a good question because this is not a word you hear everyday. However, if you would like to help your pain and your brain, this is something you want to learn about.

Allithiamine is a fat-soluble form of the popular B-1 vitamin. The difference is the B-1 you typically buy and hear about is water soluble. Our supplemental allithiamine is fat soluble. That makes a lot of difference in what it can do for your body.

Water soluble vitamins are only partially absorbed and then excreted in the urine. They do not stay around in the body for very long. Fat soluble vitamins, however, hang around in the body much longer and are able to have greater effects. This can be a valuable asset to patients suffering with an unhealthy nervous system and suffering with deficiency symptoms. If you are interested in feeling better and learning to help your pain, keep reading.

Allithiamine occurs naturally in foods of the allium family. Specifically, those include onions, garlic, and leeks. These foods have long been known to be beneficial to your health. Sometimes it can be hard to eat enough of the correct foods to help your pain and nervous system. This supplement form is often suggested for patients whose intake of B-1 sources is insufficient or  if the water soluble form is not providing the expected benefits. If you’re deficient this is a great product for helping you raise your B-1 level. It really can help your pain and improve mental clarity.

But, that bears the question…

Why Is Your Allithiamine Low?

So, why might your B-1 levels be low? There are many reasons this can occur. Here are just a few examples:

    • High carbohydrate intake – B-1 is used to metabolize these.
    • Chronic alcohol use
    • Hyperthyroidism
    • Severe infection
    • Eating a lot of processed foods
    • Many medications
    • Increasing age

As you see there are many reasons. This only scratches the surface of the causes.

Can Allithiamine Help Your Pain AND Your Brain?

A lot of times, doctors and nutritionists will recommend trying to raise your levels naturally at first. This is always best practice, of course. Besides the allium family, other foods high in thiamine consist of nuts, oats, dried beans and peas, asparagus, kale, spinach, broccoli, liver, and eggs. There are more, but this is a good list to get started with.

These foods may help to raise your B-1, but in some cases that is not enough. That’s when supplements may come into play. The benefits of supplementation when needed can be:

  • Improved nervous system health
  • Improved brain health
  • Increased energy levels
  • Improved peripheral neuropathy symptoms
  • Decreased leg cramps
  • Improved depression, anxiety, confusion

And the list could go on and on.

What Can You Do About B-1 Deficiency? How Do You Help Your Pain And Your Brain?

If you think you may suffer with or have been told you do have a thiamine (B-1) deficiency, we advise you to speak to us about allithiamine. This is a supplement proven to help many who have taken it. It is fat soluble and therefore, stays in your body longer.

For your reference, the oral and topical formulas we suggest are in the store here, in case you would like to purchase them today. Just so you know these formulas are free of wheat, corn, soy, yeast and phenol which are common food and chemical allergens.

As with any supplement be sure to check with your physicians before beginning. Patients with active cancer or history of cancer or pregnant should always check with their doctors before beginning any new vitamins or treatment regimens especially allithiamine.

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Zinc and Your Health

Zinc and Your Health

As you know, zinc is a metal. It is used in a process applied to preserve metals from corrosion, especially in salt water. This of course is called galvanization. But what you may not know is that zinc also plays a large role in your health, especially neurologic and immune system-related issues.

Zinc and Your Health

Like so many nutrients, balance is everything. Too much zinc will suppress the immune system and cause difficulties with copper levels. Too little zinc can create problems ranging from memory impairment to prostate disease.

Yes, neurologic dysfunction can result when zinc is deficient. According to Hambridge et al in 2007 in “Zinc deficiency a special challenge”, it is stated that zinc is an element with “profound biologic significance”. In fact, zinc deficiencies worldwide are responsible for many disease states.

Perhaps the most important thing to understand is that zinc imbalances are relatively common. This is due both to low levels in foods of modern agriculture as well as elevated levels of copper due to plumbing and environmental sources.

In the clinic, we will measure hair and blood levels of these crucial elements when assessing nutrition status.

In our bodies, zinc can actually act as an antioxidant. This protects us against damage from environmental assaults, as well as natural aging. The presence of zinc is essential for normal nerve function.

It is well-known that zinc can speed the healing process and, in essential amounts, will help stimulate the immune system and possibly prevent prostate disease.

When zinc is used in shampoos and skin lotions, it can act as a sunscreen, a soothing dressing, and also help prevent dandruff.

The reason that zinc is so important is that it participates in many chemical reactions, especially in enzymes.

The recommended dietary allowance for zinc is around 15 mg per day. However modern diets alone sometimes fall short of this.

The good news is, the neuropathy diet that we recommend is high in nuts and seeds which provide relatively good zinc levels. Seafood, shellfish in particular, can be great sources of dietary zinc.

For most patients, safe zinc supplementation level is probably not more than 25 mg per day. More than 50 mg a day could be detrimental. Like so many nutrients, this is one area where working with your neuropathy healthcare professionals is essential if there are any questions at all about appropriate zinc dosages.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at https://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy, Vitamin B1, and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Neuropathy, Vitamin B1, and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Did you know that Thiamine, or Vitamin B1, can actually improve blood sugar levels—and thus, diabetes?

Not too long ago, we spoke about a very important vitamin, and its role in neuropathy and chronic pain. This vitamin was B1, or Thiamine. As you may remember, B1 is part of the family of water-soluble vitamins, and our body storage is limited. Therefore, it is relatively easy to become deficient or suffer from low levels relatively quickly.

Perhaps the most significant cause of low thiamine in our society is the high carbohydrate diets that so many people consume. You see, thiamine is necessary for our bodies to produce energy. When we lack thiamine, a whole host of health problems can develop.

What many patients and their doctors may be ignorant of is the fact that thiamine (vitamin B1) can actually improve blood sugar levels—and, thus, diabetes.

In fact, in borderline diabetes, vitamin B1 may actually help drop blood sugars, and what is called glucose tolerance, or how our bodies handle sugar, to normal within a month.

I have even seen insulin-dependent diabetics drop their blood sugars over 200 points, one virtually overnight with as little as 25 mg of thiamine.

Like many nutrients, this is one place you really need to work with your clinicians. You and your doctors need to know that taking additional vitamin B1 can reduce need for medications, and sometimes even insulin.

This becomes even truer as you improve the overall quality of your diet. You and your doctors also should be aware that all not all vitamin B1 is created the same.

In particular we are very partial to Allithiamine. It is tolerated better than most other forms and is taken up by the body more efficiently than the common thiamine hydrochloride.

And this is precisely why that we recommend all diabetic patients get in the habit of checking their blood sugars on a regular basis.

This is also why sticking to a carbohydrate-controlled diet is essential.

The most important things to avoid are processed breads and grains, as well as sugars, soft drinks, candy, and virtually all sweets. You also need to be very careful with sugary or dried fruits. If you missed it, go back and review our last post about the NeuropathyDr Diet. We highly recommend this diet to our patients.

Some excellent sources of thiamine in the diet include tuna, sunflower seeds, pistachios, and other nuts, as well as many beans.

Be sure to add more of these to your diet on a daily basis and work closely with your healthcare professionals on optimum supplementation to help improve your diabetes!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at https://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy Supplements: What You Need to Know About Biotin

Many People Don’t Know About Vitamin B7, One of the Important Neuropathy Supplements.

If you’ve heard about the B vitamin known as biotin, you might have only seen references to it in terms of cosmetics. Recently there’s been a surge of beauty products that include biotin as an ingredient, supposedly to strengthen or enhance nails, skin, and hair.

The truth is, using personal products with added biotin probably will not have any impact on your hair or make your nails stronger. There’s very little hard evidence of this.

And in the general population, most people don’t have a biotin deficiency, because it’s generated by our normal gut bacteria. (The exception is when someone is taking long-term antibiotics, which can harm those intestinal bacteria and lead to low biotin levels.)

But in terms of neuropathy supplements, biotin or vitamin B7 can be a powerhouse. Here’s what neuropathy patients and especially those struggling with diabetes need to know about supplementing with biotin.
If you have a genuine deficiency in biotin, similar to the other B vitamins, you might be experiencing symptoms like fatigue, skin rashes, depression, and peripheral neuropathy.

Diabetics may have a higher than average need for supplementing with biotin. Neuropathy supplements like biotin can aid in regulating blood sugar and lipids for diabetics.

Biotin is naturally present in a broad range of foods, although the amount of biotin in a single serving tends to be very small. The key to getting enough biotin in your diet without supplementation is to stick with a regimen of plenty of leafy green veggies, eggs, and other healthy whole food sources.

For most people with neuropathic pain, biotin can help. Consult with your neuropathy specialist about whether neuropathy supplements like biotin are needed to bolster your symptom-busting neuropathy diet.

For more information about what to eat for a neuropathy diet, take a look at our neuropathy owners manual, I Beat Neuropathy!

Neuropathy Supplements: What You Need to Know About Biotin is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

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Is Lipoic Acid a Miracle Drug for Neuropathy Treatment?

If It Sounds Too Good to Be True that Lipoic Acid Could Be the Only Neuropathy Treatment You Need… You Might Be Right. Here’s What You Need to Know.

Recent studies on the use of lipoic acid supplements for neuropathic pain have led to a frenzy of interest in using this nutrient for neuropathy treatment.

In fact, it’s been touted as some kind of magic bullet that can make your neuropathy just disappear.

While lipoic acid is found in many types of foods naturally, such as spinach and broccoli, it occurs in small amounts. Preliminary studies have shown that lipoic acid may potentially improve the way that your nerve cells function, which seems like good news for neuropathy treatment.

Let’s remember, though, that there is truly no known cure for neuropathy!

As with anything else in life, something that sounds too good to be true…. probably is.

So proceed with caution if you encounter these “miracle” lipoic acid supplements at your health food store, or even if your doctor suggests lipoic acid for you.

Our neuropathy treatment principles are built around the idea that nutritional supplements can be helpful in neuropathy treatment, IF they are custom prescribed for your specific medical condition and IF they are taken in conjunction with other beneficial nutrients. That means not relying on the idea that large doses of lipoic acid, or indeed mega doses of any single nutrient, could make your neuropathy treatment worries disappear.

It’s also important to note that lipoic acid appears to work best for patients whose blood sugar is under control via careful dietary choices and regular exercise.

So, the bottom line when it comes to lipoic acid?

It may be beneficial, for SOME patients, when taken in appropriate doses in conjunction with other nutrients and a comprehensive neuropathy treatment plan.

The real first step for your neuropathy treatment should never focus on one “miracle” approach. We always recommend a thorough assessment by a clinician who is highly trained in state of the art neuropathy treatment options. Find a NeuropathyDR® clinician near you.

Is Lipoic Acid a Miracle Drug for Neuropathy Treatment? is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

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Why You Need Folic Acid to Combat Peripheral Neuropathy

Vitamin B9, AKA Folic Acid, is a Key Supplement for Maintaining and Improving Nerve Health When Dealing with Peripheral Neuropathy.

You may know that folic acid helps to prevent birth defects, which is why it’s one of the key ingredients in prenatal vitamins.

What you may not know, however, is that folic acid is a vital nutrient for people with neuropathy and chronic pain. That’s because a folic acid deficiency can directly influence the development of peripheral neuropathy.

Why is folic acid so important for those with neuropathy?

It has to do with the role of folic acid in the body. This supplement, which is also known as vitamin B9, is essential for repairing damaged cells in the body. It feeds DNA synthesis, and it’s needed for preventing anemia (a condition involving a lower than normal quantity of red blood cells).

An abnormally low level of folic acid in the body can also cause fatigue, depression, and mouth sores.

For all of these reasons, folic acid is one of the essential nutrients that should be checked by your neuropathy specialist in a routine evaluation, along with vitamins D and B12, especially if you’re over 50 years old.

Also, don’t rely on self-diagnosis for folic acid deficiency. This is important to understand because if you took a folic acid supplement without first testing for B12 deficiency, you could be masking one problem while trying to provide self treatment for another. The other reason to avoid self-diagnosing is that some vitamin deficiencies can have serious consequences for your nervous system, and it’s best to begin your neuropathy treatment with a thorough examination by a trained neuropathy specialist.

Be aware that you’re unlikely to experience a folic acid deficiency if you are following our recommended neuropathy diet. That’s because the diet includes an abundance of foods that are natural sources of the B vitamins, such as leafy green vegetables, legumes, and fresh fruits. However, it’s vital to store and prepare your food appropriately in order to avoid breakdown of key vitamins before the food is even ingested.

You can find neuropathy nutritional supplements such as our Neuropathy DR Metabolic Support Formula at the Self-Guided Care Store.

Why You Need Folic Acid to Combat Peripheral Neuropathy is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

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