3 Pieces of Better Health

3 Pieces of Better Health

Can it really be this easy? Are there really just 3 pieces of better health? The answer is a resounding yes!

Too often, like so many things we tend to make health and even treatment of certain illnesses more complicated than they need to be. As a regular reader of our materials you understand some of this already but let’s try to put it all together today in a simple fashion.

The first piece of the 3 Pieces of Better Health, in fact the mainstay of better health and yes recovery from illness has got to be diet. A plant based Mediterranean type diet. This diet with very limited, to no animal products, plenty of healthy fats like olive and fish oil and little to no refined sugars is not only perhaps the healthiest diet but also quite likely the best for our brains and nervous systems or what we doctors call neuro-protective. So this has got to be your first priority. If you need a refresher, get your ND Diet Plan HERE

There’s no question no matter where you are that physical activity is paramount to your wellness and recovery from any illness. In fact, simply start where you are! If you’re recovering from surgery for example, use that wheelchair or walker as much as you possibly can. If you are completely mobile, walk whenever you can and in fact avoid sitting for more than 20 minutes maximum any given time. Believe or not these deliberate but simple physical activities when done consistently during our day probably do more for blood flow and strength than any other single thing you can do throughout the day. This includes going to the gym in the morning and then sitting all day on the job or at home.

Finally, so much as the written about mindset and health. Make no mistake about it your attitude, your support system, your interaction with family and those you love go a long way towards ensuring you have this third but key piece of better health. And no it’s not without demanding your own needs are met. Add in daily meditation, regular thought provoking reading and simple downtime and you literally have a lifelong winning combination.

We’ll talk much more about the key chronic pain and neuropathy treatment pieces next time and as you’ll see these 3 pieces of better health slide right in a critical way.

 Finally, please don’t make your life or health plan more complicated than it is!

 Just think of all the time, money and energy you’ll save by simply becoming self sufficient with your shopping and diet, exercising at home and daily mindset & self-care!

More on Physical Activity and Your Neuropathy Treatment

More on Physical Activity and Your Neuropathy Treatment

Why is physical activity so important for good neuropathy treatment? For several reasons—but most importantly, to increase blood flow to tissue which is only accomplished by regular movement.

If you’re reading this, there’s no doubt you already understand how difficult it can be to exercise with chronic pain, especially neuropathy.

However, if you are a reader of this column you also understand the importance of being as physically active as possible, every single day.

So what I would like to do today is point out some of the simple steps that have worked for our patients, and share them with you.

The most important thing is to take a hard look at your lifestyle, and start to add additional physical activity wherever possible. Believe me, as I’ve said before, if you are recovering from a severe bout with neuropathy, illness, or surgery this may simply mean getting out of bed and up to the bathroom more often.

But let me ask you this: during the course of your day, do you commonly get in your car to take short trips to places you could walk to instead? Even if this means you take somebody with you.

Likewise, when you have the opportunity to take an elevator or stairs, do you choose the stairs? You can, if you need to, go much more slowly then usual and hold on to the hand rails.

You are still far better off exercising the large muscles of your body whenever possible, than not.

Why is this so important for good neuropathy treatment? For several reasons—but most importantly, to increase blood flow to tissue which is only accomplished by regular movement.

Only by keeping your blood vessels dilated can you expect to make as much progress as possible. Yes, good neuropathy treatment is a task. But when the results are successful, you’ll never go back to old ways again.

To pull this off successfully this also mandates good pain management at home, excellent nutrition, and regular visits with your healthcare professional.

Doing all these things together can produce extraordinary neuropathy treatment results for so many patients!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at https://neuropathydr.com.

Physical Activity and the Best Neuropathy Treatment

Physical Activity and the Best Neuropathy Treatment

Typically, inactivity will make your neuropathy worse. So, for patients who already suffer from peripheral neuropathy, this is even more critical. So what’s the solution? Physical activity!

Much has been written about the effects of exercise and health in general. But what you may not know is there are good studies showing improvements in many health parameters with regular physical activity and exercise.

Not too long ago, the American College of Sports Medicine made the statement that adults should be very physically active seven days a week. Not unexpectedly, the media attacked this as totally not doable by most adults.

But the fact is, the more sedentary our lives become, the worse our health becomes. For example, we know that metabolism slows with as little as 90 minutes of continued sitting at your desk. As your metabolism slows, you become much more efficient at making fat than you do burning it. And as a regular reader of this column, you know that poor metabolism can lead to the development of neuropathy, type II diabetes, or more serious illnesses.

So this means you can boost your metabolism with a workout at the gym or a stroll in the morning—and eat properly—but sitting all day without moving will negatively impact your health.

Typically, inactivity will make your neuropathy worse. So, for patients who already suffer from peripheral neuropathy, this is even more critical. So what’s the solution?

In simple terms, it’s important to get as much physical activity as you possibly can. In times of illness, or recovering from surgery or accidents, this may simply mean getting from bed to bathroom more often. As recovery continues, it’s imperative that you push and move as much as possible.

For patients who suffer from peripheral neuropathy of the feet, using bicycles and similar low-impact equipment can be very beneficial.

But whatever you do, make sure you are doing it often enough! Even just five minutes an hour can really add up at the end of your day.

Not only will you feel better, but you will improve the chances of a better neuropathy treatment outcome!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at https://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy and Exercise

Neuropathy and Exercise

For some, the prospect of neuropathy and exercise may seem not only unrealistic but an almost ironic misplacement of priorities.  Exercise is important for everyone, though, neuropathy and exercise can help control blood sugar and actually slow down the progression and symptoms of the condition!

Exercising regularly greatly decreases anyone’s risk of diabetic neuropathy, and has been shown to control symptoms and deterioration in sufferers by elevating overall blood flow to the limbs and controlling cardiovascular atrophy.  Depending on your specific type of neuropathy, areas affected, and the extent of the damage, you will have to adjust conventional workout routines to accommodate the condition.  Ask your NeuropathyDR® clinician if you have questions, and be sure to consult them before beginning any workout program.  Your clinician will inspect your feet and legs for signs of potential problems, and will help you make sure your shoes are properly fitted so as to avoid neuropathy-related injuries.

Additionally:

  • Use silica gel or air midsoles
  • Use polyester or polyester/cotton blend socks to keep your feet dry
  • Avoid any workout clothes that rub against your skin in the same area.

Ann Albright of the Division of Diabetes Translation in Atlanta cautions that neuropathy patients will want to steer clear of most repetitive or weight-bearing exercise, such as running, walking, or extensive weight training (although some sources advocate weight training as beneficial, in moderation).  So which exercises are the most beneficial while reducing risk?

Swimming is one of the best exercises, as it is an activity adaptable to any age, fitness level, or degree of neuropathy symptoms.  Swimming is also a full-body, “no-impact” workout, and so is less harmful to your joints, legs, and feet than most other forms of exercise, without sacrificing circulation (ask any lap swimmer and they’ll tell you—swimming has no problem getting your heart rate up!)  As such, it is highly recommended for almost anyone.

Bicycling, rowing, and use of a stationary bicycle are other excellent, low-impact activities that can be safely integrated into a neuropathy treatment program. Some organizations have even developed exercise programs for senior citizens suffering from neuropathy, incorporating a heavy emphasis on seated exercises.

If you don’t have regular access to facilities or equipment for more extensive exercise, there are some basic exercises you can do almost anywhere that can help your neuropathy!  Here are some to try:

  • For your hands, touch the pad of your thumb with your index finger, running the finger down to the base of your thumb. Then, repeat the movement with the index, middle, ring, and little fingers. Do this exercise several times.
  • For your legs and feet, straighten one knee and point your foot.  Flex your ankle five times, then circle your foot five times in each direction, clockwise and counterclockwise.
  • To increase balance, try this exercise: from a standing position, rise up slowly on your tiptoes, and then rock backward onto your heels. Keep your knees straight, but try not to lock them.

Additional precautions are vital for neuropathy patients to observe.  After every workout session, patients should remember to check their feet and any relevant extremities for blisters, irritation, or sores. These could be vulnerable to infections, which themselves could elevate risk for amputation.

It is important for neuropathy sufferers to be mindful of their heart rate and blood pressure.  Especially if you suffer from autonomic neuropathy, which can greatly increase risk of heart failure or cardiac arrest, be aware of your limitations when it comes to safe exercise.  Don’t worry—there’s a way for everyone to exercise safely.  If you have any doubts, consult your NeuropathyDR® clinician to review your workout plan.

Finally, be sure to monitor your body temperature.  Neuropathy sufferers are at high risk when it comes to overheating, since some types of neuropathy can reduce the body’s ability to temperature-control.  Consult your clinician if sweating seems overly profuse or the opposite, less than normal.

If you have any questions about neuropathy and exercise, contact us at NeuropathyDR or call
7781-659-7989

We can answer your questions and help put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician who can help you in person.  Have a great workout!

 

http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5162775_exercise-peripheral-neuropathy.html

http://journal.diabetes.org/diabetesspectrum/98v11n4/pg231.htm

http://www.livestrong.com/article/99573-exercise-peripheral-neuropathy/

http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20189334,00.html

http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20188832,00.html