Gluten Neuropathy

Could Gluten and Neuropathy be Connected?

All of us can remember at some point in time, walking into a bakery or kitchen where fresh breads and pastries were being made.

The aroma can be overwhelming and draws us in like magnets.

Now once upon a time most especially when human beings were extremely physically active, bread was in fact the staff of life. There was no problem consuming massive amounts of carbohydrates as long as it was consumed during physical activity.

Well Flash Forward 300 years and the situation is now, entirely different. Not only are we less active but grains are often heavily processed, grown on nutrient deficient soils, or perhaps even GMO.

Breads and pastries are also sources of extremely high carbohydrate levels. In fact a sandwich can have 40 to 60 grams of carbohydrates!

And this has had an effect on neuropathy and our health in general.

With neuropathy, however, the stakes are higher. Gluten can and does cause celiac disease.

Sometimes in celiac disease, the only presentation is a gluten neuropathy.

Most of the time, however, it’s a simple fact that gluten can aggravate our bellies at the least and yes even our aches and pains, including neuropathy.

You see gluten is a gooey protein. That’s what gives bread that wonderful texture.

But most of us who stop eating gluten on regular basis find out quickly how much better we feel.

It appears that this is because even those of us who don’t have celiac disease and even test negative for allergy to gluten, may still be “sensitive”.

In patients suffering from gluten neuropathy, as well as in other patients, it appears that gluten may actually trigger inflammatory reactions. This adds to pain, stiffness, and possibly neuropathy symptoms.

However the evidence is not conclusive, and there are many that would argue this point.

What I can tell you, as a clinician, is that many patients feel so much better we feel it’s worth a try.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

Copper: Another Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Most people don’t think about copper as a key nutrient. Or in any way related to peripheral neuropathy or chronic pain. But as you’ll see, a small daily amount is necessary and essential to normal health and well-being.

Only the tiniest amounts are necessary for normal health. But like so many nutrients, lack this tiny amount, and we cannot survive.

In the human body, copper serves several roles. Perhaps the most important are our body’s ability to process oxygen, and absorb iron. Both of these functions are of course essential to life.

We only need approximately 3 mg or so per day to remain healthy. Unfortunately, excess copper more than our bodies can normally dispose of can cause a whole host of health problems, and must be avoided.

The most common source of excess copper in humans is likely from copper plumbing.

Copper levels can be measured in the blood and in the hair.

As we discussed recently, excess zinc supplementation will deplete copper, creating a mineral imbalance and the health problems that go with it. So, excess zinc supplementation will cause a copper deficiency.

This can lead to a host of health problems. There is a syndrome called myeloneuropathy in which copper deficiency causes a B12 deficiency like illness, with damage to the nerves and spinal cord.

Likewise, copper deficiency due to excess zinc, either due to supplements or poisonings like denture cream, can lead to the development of neuropathy too.

One of the key functions of copper is maintenance of normal joint and soft tissue proteins. There is no scientific evidence that copper bracelets and copper socks and the like work for arthritis, even though this was once suggested as a possible cure.

Our NeuropathyDR diet is adequate for normal intake of copper because it is high in nuts and seeds. Additional good sources include olives and avocados. Paleo sources include shellfish, beef, and lamb.

Because copper is essential for normal cellular energy and respiration, a deficiency could aggravate many underlying conditions yes including chronic pain and neuropathy.

Now you know more about this pretty metal!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

The NeuropathyDR Diet and Chronic Pain Reduction Guide

How to keep what you’re eating from eating you? The key is beginning and staying with this neuropathy diet program! One of the questions we frequently get, as neuropathy and pain patients begin to understand the impact their diet has on overall health, is, “What do I eat, and when?” So, what I’m doing today is to describe a typical day of meals and snacks for a patient who is following the NeuropathyDR Diet, which is relatively easy to modify and add variety to on a regular basis.

Let’s start with Breakfast

It is very important to consume some protein within one half hour of arising. The reason for this is that it helps stimulate metabolism, protein synthesis, and mental alertness. It also helps us burn fuel more efficiently. My favorite breakfast is a vegetable protein shake, using a dairy-free protein powder with almond or coconut milk. Another good breakfast is a serving of gluten-free granola, taking care to keep carbohydrates between 15 and 20g maximum. You could also use a measured serving of gluten-free steel-cut oatmeal.

No more than three hours later, have a snack again, not exceeding 15g of carbs. This could include one half apple or banana, seven or eight almonds for other nuts, etc… Packaged protein or nut bars can be fine if the carb content is low.

Lunch should universally be some form of salad with protein

You can mix this up with your favorite greens. You could use baby spinach or mixes greens. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil, a few almonds or walnuts, and lean protein such as tuna, salmon, chicken, or turkey. If you are vegan or vegetarian, you could use tofu or tempeh.

No more than three hours later, have an additional snack, just like your mid-morning.

When dinnertime comes, this is the time to emphasize non-starchy vegetables

Some of the best are cooked spinach, broiled or sautéed asparagus, cabbage, beets, squashes, yams, and sweet potatoes, and so on. Keep starches, such as rice and white potatoes, to a minimum.

Be sure to get in a high-quality source of protein. Don’t be afraid to try things like hormone-free pork, beef, or, if available, fresh fish. Again, you could use a vegan alternative, just be careful of gluten and carb content.

Not more than three hours after dinner, have another snack.

This time, try a few gluten-free crackers with some almond butter. You can also try some sliced tofu. There are also low carbohydrate gluten-free cookies—just be careful not to eat the entire bag, which is easy to do! Another really good choice to satisfy your evening cravings is a small square of unsweetened dark chocolate.

So, what’s NOT here?

Well there is no dairy, cheese, or yogurt. There is no bread; there are no snack foods, soda, or chips. There are no ice creams or pies for dessert. There are no fruit juices, candy, or other sweets.

Do you see where we are going here? The fact of the matter is the above list of foods is probably responsible for more ill health and disease than any other single factor in the modern developed world.

The key is beginning and staying with the program. Don’t worry about the very rare weekend, or party. Just always stay trying not to go berserk. Be especially careful during holiday periods.

Consume half your body weight in ounces of clear liquids, most especially water, during plenty any 24-hour period.

Be especially careful not to overdo coffee and tea. Limit alcohol consumption to occasional low sugar wine or beer, and very rarely stronger adult beverages.

Once you make a shift, you will realize how simple, easy, and inexpensive this approach to eating–for neuropathy patients and anyone else–can be!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy Treatment Challenge

Portrait of Doctor

Neuropathy Treatment Challenge

As you probably know actually working with and effectively treating neuropathy can be extraordinarily challenging. Neuropathy is almost never an isolated symptom. Very rarely does it occur just by itself. It is so often the result of many different causes and other conditions.

Fortunately, the most common cause is correctable. As you have read here before the most common cause of neuropathy is prediabetes also known as metabolic syndrome or Syndrome X. This is a lifestyle disorder often caused by years of weight gain, aggravated by cigarette smoking, and inactivity.

The underlying conditions related to other forms of neuropathy such as genetic types can by very challenging!

But there are some truths that are common to all of these types of neuropathy in many forms of chronic pain.

And that is drug only therapy serves to simply mask the symptoms and not treat the underlying illness.
Too often patients who suffer from #neuropathy, #fibromyalgia and other forms of chronic pain can go on this pattern for many years before effective treatment is actually implemented.

This neuropathy and chronic pain treatment of course centers around improving our overall level of health and well being! Physically, mentally, and spiritually. Cleaning up our diets, getting on appropriate exercise programs and minimizing medications is better long term approach.

You must at all costs avoid prolonged self-treatment for pain or other annoying symptoms!

It is not unusual now that we see patients taking large amounts of self-prescribed over-the-counter drugs ending up with liver kidney damage and sometimes organ failure.

Don’t let this be you! Yes of course some medications are necessary to help with pain but using them only to the exclusion of other good self-care is a sure path down the road to disaster.

It’s very important that you take the most appropriate steps to actually improve your underlying health and function as quickly as possible.

Let Our Team of Clinicians Help!

Be Sure To Join us all day on Facebook!

 

Vitamin D and Dementia

Vitamin D and Dementia

Even the news media has latched onto this one. Vitamin D is associated with many diseases and conditions. Now as it turns out as we have long suspected vitamin D is critical for brain health.

The most recent research highlights the relationship between vitamin D and dementia. Turns out maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D may actually prevent the onset of brain disease commonly called dementia.

But what about its involvement with neuropathy and chronic pain? Over the last few years we have highlighted it’s role, and the fact that vitamin D deficiencies are associated with chronic pain.

Furthermore vitamin D deficiencies are often associated with peripheral neuropathy.

Often times there is no direct cause and effect noted but we do know that vitamin D deficiency is associated with chronic poor health and many diseases and illnesses.

But why is this? How can one nutrient have such profound effects? The reason is vitamin acts as a hormone. Also acts as a cellular protectant.

One mistake that too many make however is simply blindly taking vitamin D without having it’s blood levels measured. This is a point I cannot stress enough.

You must know your vitamin D levels like you know your height ,weight and blood pressure.

So why not learn more about how vitamin D may help protect you from dementia, as well as numerous other disorders, including neuropathy as well as many forms of chronic pain!

Just use the search function on his site and go through our archives and learn much more about vitamin D!

There’s no other way to say it.

This should be part of routine testing for all patients, no excuses.

Tell us what you think here on Facebook

Neuropathy Lab Tests

There is No Single Neuropathy Lab Test as Neuropathy is often a “Symptom” of Many Conditions.

Is There A Specific Neuropathy Lab Test?

One of the things that surprises many patients new to peripheral neuropathy and many other forms of chronic pain, is that is there is no single neuropathy or pain causing lab test to identify their problem.

In fact there is no single laboratory tests by itself, which is hundred percent accurate for so many disorders.

This of course is difficult not only for patients, but their families AND the physicians and therapists like ourseslves who treat peripheral neuropathy and chronic pain.

As we talk about often, neuropathy is most often a “symptom” of other conditions and as in the case of chemotherapy, toxic, or drug related neuropathy possibly caused by treatment. It is not necessarily a primary diagnosis.

So what this means is that very careful attention needs to be paid to multiple factors at the same time. This also often includes multiple laboratory tests.

For the patient new to neuropathy or chronic pain, this will oftentimes include blood tests. If it’s possibly related to a structural or spinal condition then MRIs, x-rays, CAT scans, and other tests may also be necessary.

One of the most important things your clinician will do is to conduct a very detailed physical examination.

Only after ALL of these things are done and then put together by an expert, can you most accurately identify what maybe going on.

This is NOT a one step or simple process!

So realize that in order to maximize your recovery, EARLY good care must still be administered ESPECIALLY when an accurate diagnosis is not possible! As we spoke about last time, waiting to act on correctable factors while obtaining a “perfect” assessment is the worst thing you can do.

And many times neuropathy and chronic pain patients are frustrated with negative or nearly normal tests. But as I tell my patients all the time, this is often the sign of a much better prognosis!

So of course you should work with your doctors and therapists in establishing an accurate diagnosis.

But don’t be surprised if this is not possible.

Often times there are several different conditions and lifestyle factors that work together to cause neuropathy and chronic pain. Typically these are stress, obesity, smoking and poor physical conditioning.

This is why it is so important that you address ALL these things together with your NeuropathyDR Clinician to give your body the best shot at any possible improvement or recovery!

For more information on neuropathy and chronic pain, join us all day on Facebook!

Start a Proper Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet Plan Today!

Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet

Get Started on a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan today!

Start a Proper Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet Plan Today!

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet. You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage.

One of the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12. Fight neuropathy by eating foods like meat, fish, and eggs that are all high in B vitamins. If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry! There are many kinds of fortified cereals that contain substantial amounts of B vitamins as well (in addition to supplements, which we’ll talk about in a moment).

The Mayo Clinic recommends a diet high in fruits and vegetables for people who suffer from neuropathy. Fruits and vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy. Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels. If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut fruit and vegetables at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for a neuropathic diet, according to neurology.com. A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy. Breakfast cereals, whole grains, vegetables and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy. Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. A variety of foods—skinless white-meat poultry, legumes, tofu, fish, and low-fat yogurt—are good sources of lean protein. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels. Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, and sardines are good for maintaining levels of Omega-3 acids, healthy fats the body needs but cannot produce on its own.

For specific types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time. For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage. Consult your NeuropathyDR® specialist for the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are eating? The easiest way is to keep a food journal. Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking. Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms! As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy. If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help! Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a nutritionist or qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements can also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration. Supplementing B Vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12, can help regulate your nutrient levels and prevent neuropathy symptoms. Supplementing with fish oil can help replenish Omega-3 fatty acids, which are important if you suffer from type-II diabetes. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult your NeuropathyDR® clinician for specific recommendations.

Contact us if you have any questions about a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan. We can help you find the information you need and put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician who can help you with this and other neuropathy-related questions!

Join our conversation today on Facebook by clicking HERE!

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/peripheral-neuropathy/DS00131/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies

http://www.foundationforpn.org/livingwithperipheralneuropathy/neuropathynutrition/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/82184-foods-fight-neuropathy/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/121841-nutrients-neuropathy/

Vitamin A Neuropathy & Health

Vitamin A Is a Key Neuropathy and Health Nutrient

Vitamin AThis key nutrient is responsible in a large part for healthy skin and epithelial cells. Those little guys are the cells, which line our mouth, GI tract and even our lungs.

This is why you now see so many skin lotions and topical drugs with Vitamin A derivatives.

Vitamin A is also needed if or a normal healthy immune system. In fact, during times of infection, I’ll suggest patients take some very large amounts but just for a few days. There are however two serious CAUTIONS! If you are pregnant or of childbearing age you need to know excess Vitamin A is teratogenic, meaning it can cause birth defects. This is why we advise young women take natal only formulas for at least 6 months before conception. These formulas also contain extra Folic acid, which helps prevent birth defects.

The next caution is that excess Vitamin A can be TOXIC If you consume too much and possibly in liver disease. Vitamin A Is one of the fat soluble vitamins, so it hangs around in our bodies a good bit longer than things like most B vitamins. So please work with your own health professionals on dosages for you.

Deficiencies in this key nutrient are more likely in malabsorbtion syndromes and bowel diseases. If you are following the NeuropathDR Diet Plan you should be in good shape, as long as you are consuming lots of leafy green and brightly colored vegetables.

Unfortunately, it’s only beta-carotene not the other caratenoids which have significant pro-vitamin A value. So veggies like carrots are particularly good for this reason.
Retinol is the most active form and is found in meats. This largely depends upon how healthy the animals are we consume.

Because Vitamin A is so critical to immune function it has roles in prevention of infection and probably many cancers as well.

So know you know! Don’t ignore this Key Neuropathy Diet Plan nutrient!

Share Your Thoughts and Join the conversation on Facebook!

Vitamin b12

Vitamin B12 and Your Neuropathy

Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause or contribute to the development of peripheral neuropathy.

Vitamin b12

Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient, which when missing, contributes to, and may actually create a number of different diseases.

Not the least of which is causing or contributing to the development of peripheral neuropathy.

The reason for this is that vitamin B12 is absolutely essential for the normal function of every cell in the brain and nervous system.

Damage to the nervous system caused by vitamin B12 deficiency can actually be permanent and irreversible.

Like so many of the other nutrients we’ve spoken about already, vitamin B12 is also essential for energy production and cellular repair.

B12 is manufactured by bacteria and then ingested by animals. In animals, as well as humans, it undergoes conversion to one or more active forms.

In the autoimmune disease pernicious anemia, a lack of intrinsic factor needed for normal absorption of B12 in the small bowel leads the development of vitamin B12 deficiency—and, possibly, also the diseases that that can cause.

Deficiency of vitamin B12 is also one of the more common deficiencies we see in private practice. When we check with laboratory studies, many adults have inadequate levels.

Signs and symptoms of low vitamin B12 levels are very common and are often passed on as simple fatigue or aging. These symptoms include low energy, fatigue, depression, and memory changes. B12 deficiency in the outpatient setting is probably second only to vitamin D.

Low B12 levels can be due to a combination of diet and a number of different factors. Normal aging is one of these factors; B12 deficiency is much more common in adults over 50.

Some other factors include chronic use of medications that affect the lining of the GI tract, bowel diseases, and actually many prescription medications.

One of the most common reasons for vitamin B12 deficiency in diabetics is the prescription drug metformin.

Like all the key nutrients, it is most important to clearly identify, then attempt to correct a vitamin B12 deficiency.

Eliminating correctable underlying causes such as poor dietary habits and unnecessary drug use are two of the most common ones that I see in my practice—and are two of the easiest fixes.

High dosages of oral supplementation under supervision and/or injection of vitamin B12 may be necessary to correct low levels and frank deficiencies.

Since the effects of vitamin B12 deficiency can be permanent, is very important that you and your doctors take this nutrient and its deficiency very seriously.

This is especially true if you suffer from neuropathy or any neurologic disorder.

So don’t be afraid to ask questions.

I still recommend all adults should routinely have vitamin B12, vitamin D, and folic acid levels checked at every annual physical examination and more often once supplementation has begun.|

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Allithiamine Tablets

More Vitamin B1 and #Neuropathy Treatment

Vitamin B1 has beneficial effects on neuropathy.

Allithiamine Tablets

 

If you follow our series of nutrition articles and yes our regular articles, you know that we frequently talk about the importance of vitamin B-1. But you may not know that thiamine or vitamin B1 occurs in several different forms.

Vitamin B1 is hugely important. It helps our bodies indeed, it helps every cell to produce energy more efficiently. It also can have a very significant effect on lowering blood sugar, stimulating mental alertness, and having a calming effect on the nervous system. In fact thiamine is the key nutrient given to alcoholics who are withdrawing.

The most common form in dietary supplements is thiamine hydrochloride. And for most patients this is the most common form that is consumed. It is relatively inexpensive and tolerated well by most patients. One of the disadvantages however is that it can cause stomach upset.

There are different forms of vitamin B1 that have been available for some time. One in particular is in the synthetic form called benfotiamine and has been used in Europe and Japan for over 30 years for the treatment of nerve pain and related conditions.

There is however even a slightly different form that is naturally present in sulfur containing plants. Its chemical analog is now synthesized. One of these is called Allithiamine with an A. This unique substance is at least in part of what is responsible for the natural odor of garlic and onions.

Now it is not a perfect substance. It has a characteristic odor, which some people find highly objectionable. *We do not know enough about its long-term usage and extreme caution is advised in giving it to any patient who has a history of cancer or a metastatic disease.

But what we do know is this; conditions including neuropathy that benefit from the beneficial effects of vitamin B1 oftentimes respond very well to Allithiamine, both in tablet and cream form.

What most people undergoing effective neuropathy treatment have discovered is that when they begin to use it, they won’t use anything else!

Join the conversation today on Facebook!

#Neuropathy And The Blood Sugar Connection Part II

#Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are two diseases that are becoming much more common.

Food

Although there are genetic contributions, most of the time metabolic syndrome and diabetes develop because of a declining level of physical fitness and carrying around too much body fat.

Our so-called modern high-fat and high sugar diets are a big contribution. Most adults need only 2000 calories or so per day yet some people consume as much as 6000 calories or more per day for years on end.

Diabetes and it’s precursor called the metabolic syndrome, are two diseases that are becoming much more common as the result of consuming too many calories and lack of physical activity and exercise.

One of the most devastating things that tens to happen as a direct result of metabolic syndrome and in a large number of patients who suffer from diabetes is peripheral neuropathy.

Most often this does not happen overnight. It takes many years for these to develop and by that time, considerable damage often has been done. This is why it is so important to control your calorie intake and maintain the highest level of physical activity. You can at any age!

Once the damage from elevated blood sugar is done, simply getting sugars under control is not enough! This is a myth that both physicians and patients alike don’t fully understand. There are good studies that show 75% of time just getting sugars control is not enough – you could be left with significant pain and disability just by treating the elevated blood sugar!

This is where a comprehensive NeuropathyDR Treatment plan may help you substantially!

So isn’t it time you learn all you can about #neuropathy treatment in advance?

Remember, we are here to help.

We will do everything in our power to help nurse you back to health, but YOU must reach out and grab all these tools!

Otherwise you run the risk of suffering miserably for the rest of your life.

Harsh words? Yes.

But it is the truth.

post your comments and questions on Facebook!

Vitamin K and Your Healthy Lifestyle

Foods like romaine lettuce, Swiss chard, and spinach are particularly plentiful in Vitamin K. So if you follow the NeuropathyDR Diet, you likely don’t need to worry about getting enough.

Vitamin K is another nutrient we don’t frequently hear much about.

That is unless, of course, you suffer from Afib or a clotting disorder. But more on that story later!

VeggiesLike all vitamins, a deficiency here can kill us! You see vitamin K gets is name from a German word for coagulation (Koagulationsvitamin). The reason is, without proper levels of Vitamin K, we could bleed to death!

Like all nutrients, there is so much more. Vitamin K1 occurs naturally in green plants. Foods like romaine lettuce, Swiss chard, and spinach are particularly plentiful. So if you follow the NeuropathyDR Diet, you likely don’t need to worry about getting enough.

Good dietary intakes of green leafy vegetables and the Vitamin K they contain are associated with less risk of diabetes, some cancers, and heart disease.

Exceptions or those at risk for deficiency are those patients with bowel disease, alcoholism, or long-term antibiotic usage which can kill normal bacteria in our bellies.

In humans, K1 is converted to, and then stored as, K2. There are also several other forms—some are even used used in medicine for treating bone loss.

The three major areas Vitamin K has a role in are blood clotting (coagulation), helping the maintenance of normal healthy bone, and in normal blood vessel health. Bone health is of particular concern as we age. We do know that patients with osteoporosis or thinning of the bones have low levels of Vitamin K2.

The one area that concerns patients more than others with vitamin K is that its intake in your diet needs to be limited if you take Coumadin. Coumadin (Warfarin) is the drug given as a blood thinner when patients suffer from conditions like the heart disorder atrial fibrilation. Afib, as it is called, is common in diabetics, so of course we see this in the neuropathy clinic frequently.

As a side note, lots of the preventive diet and nutrition strategies we discuss can benefit—and possibly prevent—Afib in the first place.

There are newer blood thinning drugs without Vitamin K interactions, but some of them are far riskier than the time-tested drug Warfarin.

So, now you know the essentials. But we have not heard the last on Vitamin K and good health, I am sure!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Got Neuropathy? Then Dump Dairy!

Dairy consumption almost always makes patients with peripheral neuropathy and chronic pain suffer more than necessary.

This series of articles will not be “politically correct”. Nor will it likely be popular with the mainstream press. But the fact of the matter is, anybody with a degree in nutrition, who has done across the board research, understands the dangers of dairy products and human diet.

Calcium and vitamin D are essential for human health, but there are far healthier ways to get both of these besides milk consumption.

Calcium and vitamin D are essential for human health, but there are far healthier ways to get both of these besides milk consumption.

A landmark book on dairy and health called The China Study was published some years back. As serious students of health and nutrition, I recommend you get and read a copy of this book, at least once.

There are several major problems with dairy consumption in the human diet, but by reading magazines and watching television you would never know it.

The dairy industry is a huge industry—unfortunately, with an incestuous relationship with the FDA.

Almost everybody knows about struggling with lactose intolerance. Lactose is a milk sugar, which is difficult for some people to digest. But the dairy story goes far deeper.

One of my professors once said it best. Milk is designed to be a hormone delivery system from cow to calf. It is not intended for human consumption. Human milk is for humans, but only in the first two years of life.

Let’s first start off by talking about osteoporosis. Both doctors and patients alike are taught that dairy builds strong bones. Yes, calcium and vitamin D are essential for human health, but there are far healthier ways to get both of these besides milk consumption.

One of the most eye-opening things regarding osteoporosis is when scientists look at relatively “primitive” cultures which are active, consume a plant-based diet, spend a fair amount of time outside—and, almost never get osteoporosis.

This is in stark contrast to more developed countries like the USA, where osteoporosis is rampant and people consume large amounts of dairy and animal products.

Also, milk contains certain hormones, which are detrimental to human health. Some of these compounds have been linked to the development of cancers.

But, most importantly, dairy can aggravate inflammation in the body. And it almost always makes patients with peripheral neuropathy and chronic pain suffer more than necessary.

Future articles will talk more about the dangers of dairy products, but, suffice it to say, there are now many readily available alternatives. These alternatives include products made from almonds, coconuts, and rice.

It takes a little bit of experimentation to find exactly what works for you, but making the shift towards a more healthy diet goes a long way towards providing a healing environment for your neuropathy and chronic pain.

Are you thinking of giving up dairy? Have you already? Share your experience on our Facebook page!