Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Make your Neuropathy Treatment Plan Today!

Those who use written neuropathy treatment plans have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

If you or someone you love suffers from peripheral neuropathy, you know how devastating this condition can be. You probably are also aware of the immense life changes a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy can bring.

But the good news is, as you read on these pages repeatedly there is a whole lot you can learn to better deal with your peripheral neuropathy.

This is where having a written neuropathy treatment plan goes along way. In fact you could apply this to almost any illness.

Here’s what to do next:

First of all take out a large piece of paper, or even on mobile phone. Actually, in this stage I am a huge fan of mobile notes sync across all devices.

On your neuropathy treatment plan should first be all your known risk factors. This would include things like cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption, inactivity, and perhaps diabetes. Maybe there are other known factors, such as consumption of medications known to produce peripheral neuropathy.

Once you have your list, then you need to divide it into things that you can change. The very next thing you need to do is to prioritize your neuropathy treatment plan. For example what is having the biggest impact on your health?

This is the very first thing, although perhaps the most difficult that you need to do first.

By first developing a neuropathy treatment plan and then using your own willpower and discipline, along with the help from your family and healthcare professionals, you can do a whole lot to help yourself feel better and function better!

And this really is the entire premise of the Beating Neuropathy family. We are here to help and support you!

What we do know however is those who use written neuropathy treatment plans and not only work off them but share them with their neuropathy treatment specialists have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

To that end, we are here to support you!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

More Vitamin B1 and Neuropathy Treatment

Vitamin B1 has beneficial effects on neuropathy.

 If you follow our series of nutrition articles and yes our regular articles, you know that we frequently talk about the importance of vitamin B-1 and neuropathy treatment. You may not know that thiamine or vitamin B1 occurs in several different forms.

Vitamin B1 is hugely important as it helps our bodies by causing every cell to produce energy more efficiently. It also can have a very significant effect on lowering blood sugar, stimulating mental alertness, and having a calming effect on the nervous system. In fact thiamine is the key nutrient given to alcoholics who are withdrawing.

The most common form in dietary supplements is thiamine hydrochloride. And for most patients this is the most common form that is consumed. It is relatively inexpensive and tolerated well by most patients. One of the disadvantages however is that it can cause stomach upset.

There are different forms of vitamin B1 that have been available for some time. One in particular is in the synthetic form called benfotiamine and has been used in Europe and Japan for over 30 years for the treatment of nerve pain and related conditions.

There is however even a slightly different form that is naturally present in sulfur containing plants. Its chemical analog is now synthesized. One of these is called Allithiamine with an A. This unique substance is at least in part of what is responsible for the natural odor of garlic and onions.

Now it is not a perfect substance. It has a characteristic odor, which some people find highly objectionable. *We do not know enough about its long-term usage and extreme caution is advised in giving it to any patient who has a history of cancer or a metastatic disease.

But what we do know is this; conditions including neuropathy that benefit from the beneficial effects of vitamin B1 oftentimes respond very well to Allithiamine, both in tablet and cream form.

What most people undergoing effective neuropathy treatment have discovered is that when they begin to use it, they won’t use anything else!

 

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

LED Light Therapy and Peripheral Neuropathy

LED may be able to help your peripheral neuropathy.

LED, or light emitting diodes, have been around for quite some time. In fact, some of their original applications date back to the space program of the 1990s. Light energy is simply particles that can penetrate tissue at selected depths.

According to NASA, LEDs has been utilized as part of cancer treatment.  LED usage has also been approved by the Naval special warfare command. LEDs have also been used for improved wound healing

But how exactly does this work?

Light energy is simply clusters of photons or particles that can penetrate tissue at selected depths. What has been known for centuries is that light speeds healing.  A long time ago, ill patients from infectious disease units and TB wards were rolled out into sunlight daily. Wounds were also exposed to sunlight to heal. {1}

We also know that light therapy does have specific effects. The most important effect of that may have a bearing on peripheral neuropathy and related conditions, is the ability to stimulate metabolism or cellular efficiency.

You see, all the work we have done in the treatment of peripheral neuropathy since 2008 has been focused upon metabolic stimulation.

With the addition of LED also known as light therapy, we are now able to expand our reach and help more patients than ever before. Although the research is early, it is extraordinarily encouraging.

Talk to your clinician about possibly adding LED therapy to your neuropathy treatment. Consider this especially if you suffer from diabetic neuropathy or other poor wound-healing complications. Then Contact one of our NeuropathyDR® clinicians to schedule an appointment for Light therapy at our clinic.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

References:

{1} http://sbir.nasa.gov/SBIR/successes/ss/8-035text.html

Taking Charge of Your Health

Is Your Neuropathy Making You Feel Like You’ve Lost Control?

Neuropathy symptoms can make you feel like your health has spun out of control. But regardless of the particulars of your situation, there’s one thing for sure—anxiety and disappointment about the state of your personal healthcare are likely exacerbating your symptoms.

The number one reason to step in and take charge of your own wellness is that feeling in control will make you feel better. Anxiety can compound existing symptoms (such as trouble sleeping) and create new ones by putting the focus on what’s not working. But it’s important to remember that you DO have control over many of the factors that can positively influence your health in a big way.

Many people come to us looking for a “magic bullet,” one simple pill or procedure that will cure neuropathy overnight and permanently. They want a neuropathy treatment formula in a bottle like a one-a-day supplement.

Of course, there are many medically-based aspects to our treatment program, but there are also several significant components of the program that are completely in your control as beneficial lifestyle changes to impact neuropathy. Here are just two simple examples of things that YOU can control in your healthcare, starting today.

First, begin making small, gradual improvements in your diet. Start by weaning away from sodas and processed foods. Notice that you don’t have to go cold turkey or give them up “forever.” Just switch to thinking of them as occasional treats. Choose organic and local produce and other foods whenever you can. Seek out natural and healthy alternatives to your usual meal routine.

Second, get moving. Many people shudder at the thought of doing “exercise”. Forget all that and just start moving more than usual—a walk around the block twice a day, slow-dancing to the oldies in your living room, or even vigorous housework or gardening are all candidates for healthy and fun exercise. Make sure you check with your doctor first to find out what’s appropriate for you.

The key is to think of “diet and exercise” not as unreachable fitness goals but as things you already incorporate into your everyday life. Just introduce a small shift in the WAY you do these things, and let a tiny pebble of intention turn into an avalanche of increased health!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

Hereditary Neuropathy

If you’re reading this and you’re already in your late 20’s or early 30’s (or older) and you have:

• Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
• Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP)
• Dejerine-Sottas Disease (DSD)
• Hereditary Motor Neuropathy (HMN)

You were probably diagnosed in your teens or possibly earlier.  But if you or someone you know is in their teens (or younger) and they have a combination of the following symptoms:

• Numbness
• Tingling
• Pain in their feet and hands
• Weakness and loss of muscle mass (especially in their calves or lower legs and feet)
• Impaired sweating
• Insensitivity to pain
• Foot deformities such as hammer toes or high arches
• Scoliosis (curvature of the spine)

It might be time to do some genetic testing to determine if they have a form of hereditary neuropathy.

What is Hereditary Neuropathy?

Hereditary neuropathies are inherited disorders that affect the peripheral nervous system, often resulting in peripheral neuropathy.  Hereditary neuropathies can affect you in many different ways but they are usually grouped into four different categories:

Motor and sensory neuropathy – affecting movement and the ability to feel sensations
Sensory neuropathy – affecting the senses
Motor neuropathy – affecting the ability to move
Sensory and autonomic neuropathy – affecting the ability to feel sensation and the autonomic nervous system (the system that controls your ability to sweat, your heart rate, your body’s ability to regulate your blood pressure, your digestion, etc.)

As the names imply, they are classified based on exactly which nerves are affected and which functions are impaired.

The most common form of hereditary neuropathy is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (a motor and sensory neuropathy)  affecting 1 out of every 2500 people.  Most people with CMT are diagnosed before they reach their 20’s but their symptoms can begin years earlier.  CMT may take a while to diagnose because the symptoms can wax and wane over a period of years.

How Can I Find Out if I Have Hereditary Neuropathy?

The only way to diagnose hereditary neuropathy is through blood tests for genetic testing, nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsies.   If you’ve been diagnosed without going through any of these tests, you probably don’t have a good diagnosis.

Your doctor should take a very thorough history and physical.  In order to really determine if you are at risk for hereditary neuropathy, you need to look as far back as three generations.  However, a word to the wise, even if you hereditary neuropathy has not shown up in your family previously, all inherited diseases have to start somewhere.  You could just be the person starting it in your family.   That makes genetic testing even more important.

Are Hereditary Neuropathies Curable?

There are no cures for the various types of hereditary neuropathies.  Treatment is usually to treat the symptoms and give your body the support it needs to function as normally as possible.  That usually means physical and occupational therapy,  as well as

• Care and correction for your muscular and skeletal systems
• Treatment for any other underlying medical problems
• Nutrition education and diet planning
• A step by step exercise regimen
• Medication as needed or necessary

A highly skilled medical professional well versed in diagnosing and treating nerve damage is your best place to start for treatment of your Hereditary Neuropathy.  An excellent place to start is with a NeuropathyDr® clinician.  They have had great success in treating patients with hereditary neuropathy in all its various forms.

If you have a confirmed diagnosis of Hereditary Neuropathy or think you may have it, seek treatment now.  While you can’t be cured, you can take steps to treat and lessen your symptoms and greatly improve your quality of life.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

Your Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Make your Neuropathy Treatment Plan Today!

Those who use written neuropathy treatment plans have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

If you or someone you love suffers from peripheral neuropathy, you know how devastating this condition can be. You probably are also aware of the immense life changes a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy can bring.

But the good news is, as you read on these pages repeatedly there is a whole lot you can learn to better deal with your peripheral neuropathy.

This is where having a written neuropathy treatment plan goes along way. In fact you could apply this to almost any illness.

Here’s what to do next:

First of all take out a large piece of paper, or even on mobile phone. Actually, in this stage I am a huge fan of mobile notes sync across all devices.

On your neuropathy treatment plan should first be all your known risk factors. This would include things like cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption, inactivity, and perhaps diabetes. Maybe there are other known factors, such as consumption of medications known to produce peripheral neuropathy.

Once you have your list, then you need to divide it into things that you can change. The very next thing you need to do is to prioritize your neuropathy treatment plan. For example what is having the biggest impact on your health?

This is the very first thing, although perhaps the most difficult that you need to do first.

By first developing a neuropathy treatment plan and then using your own willpower and discipline, along with the help from your family and healthcare professionals, you can do a whole lot to help yourself feel better and function better!

What we do know is those who use written neuropathy treatment plans and not only work off them but share them with their neuropathy treatment specialists have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

To that end, we are here to support you!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

Good Neuropathy Treatment is All About Energy

What makes for good neuropathy treatment? It all comes down to efficiency and energy improvements of your nerves.

We spoke previously about the theory behind good neuropathy treatments and systems. In fact, our company NeuropathyDR has been a pioneer in this area.

But what makes for good neuropathy treatment?

It all comes down to efficiency and energy improvements of your nerves. You see, many forms of peripheral neuropathy develop when our nerve cells no longer function properly. We used to think the nerve cells simply die.

In some cases, like genetic disease, toxic chemicals, or severe injury, this is true. In these cases, neuropathy recovery is minimal or impossible. But the good news is, for many patients, nerve cells are not dead, but simply damaged, and may be nursed back to health.

But how do we do this?

After very careful evaluation and oversight, and by treating using three simultaneous neuropathy treatment methods.

The first is improving energy efficiency (metabolism) with special diets, supplements, and correcting any underlying thyroid, diabetic, or other medical issues. These alone, in many cases, can have a tremendous impact on the outcome of your neuropathy treatment. Likewise, if these are left uncorrected, any neuropathy treatment is likely to fail.

The second part is improving biomechanics or skeletal function.

Many times, adults suffer from conditions like arthritis, disc injuries and even old athletic injuries that impair motion, ultimately limiting circulation to vital tissues, including nerves. Improving overall circulation and muscle and joint function is critical to patients that suffer from peripheral neuropathy.

The third part is the direct application of energy-stimulating treatments. In the clinic, these can include laser therapy, LED light therapy, as well as various forms of manipulation, massage, nerve stimulation, and possibly even acupuncture.

But the key to good neuropathy treatment is making sure that everything that needs to be done is taken care of in precisely the right order, and time. It is also critical that home care treatment takes place and supports everything that takes place in the clinic.

As you can see, these treatment programs require considerable attention to detail.

In mild cases of peripheral neuropathy, lifestyle and dietary shifts with appropriate home care alone may facilitate recovery.

But in many cases, good neuropathy treatment is only possible with the assistance of a dedicated healthcare professional.

That is after all, why we are here.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

More on Physical Activity and Your Neuropathy Treatment

Why is physical activity so important for good neuropathy treatment? For several reasons—but most importantly, to increase blood flow to tissue which is only accomplished by regular movement.

If you’re reading this, there’s no doubt you already understand how difficult it can be to exercise with chronic pain, especially neuropathy.

However, if you are a reader of this column you also understand the importance of being as physically active as possible, every single day.

So what I would like to do today is point out some of the simple steps that have worked for our patients, and share them with you.

The most important thing is to take a hard look at your lifestyle, and start to add additional physical activity wherever possible. Believe me, as I’ve said before, if you are recovering from a severe bout with neuropathy, illness, or surgery this may simply mean getting out of bed and up to the bathroom more often.

But let me ask you this: during the course of your day, do you commonly get in your car to take short trips to places you could walk to instead? Even if this means you take somebody with you.

Likewise, when you have the opportunity to take an elevator or stairs, do you choose the stairs? You can, if you need to, go much more slowly then usual and hold on to the hand rails.

You are still far better off exercising the large muscles of your body whenever possible, than not.

Why is this so important for good neuropathy treatment? For several reasons—but most importantly, to increase blood flow to tissue which is only accomplished by regular movement.

Only by keeping your blood vessels dilated can you expect to make as much progress as possible. Yes, good neuropathy treatment is a task. But when the results are successful, you’ll never go back to old ways again.

To pull this off successfully this also mandates good pain management at home, excellent nutrition, and regular visits with your healthcare professional.

Doing all these things together can produce extraordinary neuropathy treatment results for so many patients!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Physical Activity and the Best Neuropathy Treatment

Typically, inactivity will make your neuropathy worse. So, for patients who already suffer from peripheral neuropathy, this is even more critical. So what’s the solution? Physical activity!

Much has been written about the effects of exercise and health in general. But what you may not know is there are good studies showing improvements in many health parameters with regular physical activity and exercise.

Not too long ago, the American College of Sports Medicine made the statement that adults should be very physically active seven days a week. Not unexpectedly, the media attacked this as totally not doable by most adults.

But the fact is, the more sedentary our lives become, the worse our health becomes. For example, we know that metabolism slows with as little as 90 minutes of continued sitting at your desk. As your metabolism slows, you become much more efficient at making fat than you do burning it. And as a regular reader of this column, you know that poor metabolism can lead to the development of neuropathy, type II diabetes, or more serious illnesses.

So this means you can boost your metabolism with a workout at the gym or a stroll in the morning—and eat properly—but sitting all day without moving will negatively impact your health.

Typically, inactivity will make your neuropathy worse. So, for patients who already suffer from peripheral neuropathy, this is even more critical. So what’s the solution?

In simple terms, it’s important to get as much physical activity as you possibly can. In times of illness, or recovering from surgery or accidents, this may simply mean getting from bed to bathroom more often. As recovery continues, it’s imperative that you push and move as much as possible.

For patients who suffer from peripheral neuropathy of the feet, using bicycles and similar low-impact equipment can be very beneficial.

But whatever you do, make sure you are doing it often enough! Even just five minutes an hour can really add up at the end of your day.

Not only will you feel better, but you will improve the chances of a better neuropathy treatment outcome!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

My Neuropathy Symptoms Aren’t That Bad!

One thing that we see fairly frequently in our clinics is when patients present with the early onset of neuropathy symptoms.

If you’re experiencing neuropathy symptoms, such as pain, tingling, numbness, or burning, this could be due to things such as chemotherapy, statin medications, or perhaps even “pre-diabetes” now called metabolic syndrome.

Now there are cases of course where neuropathy is not long-term.

This usually occurs in younger patients, who have been exposed to poisons or medications that eventually are stopped.

Unfortunately, for many adults neuropathy it is a very different situation. For most of us, saying “I have a little neuropathy” is just like saying “I’m a little bit pregnant”.

In order to have effective neuropathy treatment it is critical to identify correctable factors causing your neuropathy symptoms early on. This would include things such as obesity, certain medications, and lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking. Likewise, it is also very important to begin the most appropriate neuropathy treatment as soon as possible.

You see one of the things we know beyond the shadow of a doubt is that when patients begin neuropathy treatment early and seriously the long-term results are far better.

In our clinic we find that patients who treat their neuropathy early are less debilitated, and return to better function much more easily.

So what can you do?

First of all, do not be a “minimizer”. When you experience neuropathy symptoms such as pain, tingling, numbness, or burning, have them thoroughly checked out as soon as possible by a licensed healthcare professional.

Next, help your clinicians help you by fully revealing your family history, medication usage, and other factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, et cetera.

Lastly, learn the importance of good homecare programs. Our NeuropathyDR homecare programs can speed your progress as well as improve your neuropathy treatment results, often times dramatically.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

It Can’t Be My Diet!

”Why do I feel so lousy all the time?”

Unfortunately we hear this often at our NeuropathyDR clinics. You see, there is a tendency now for people not to prepare or consume fresh foods, especially vegetables. Too often, fast food works its way into our diets.

As for people with peripheral neuropathy and chronic pain, this is like pouring gasoline on fire!

The reason for this is that poor food choices raise blood fats and blood sugars. When blood sugar is increased, some of the sugar molecules tend to attach to proteins; proteins like those that help make up our muscles and skin.

This then leads to aches, stiffness, and quite possibly inflammation. For the peripheral neuropathy sufferer, regardless of the cause, this typically poor diet seems to make it worse.

Increased sugar consumption in addition to aggravating your underlying neuropathy, will cause you to gain weight, lose energy and sleep more poorly.

The good news is however when you make deliberate changes to when and how you are eating, you often times will find yourself feeling better than ever!

So, how do we do this without becoming overwhelmed?

The simplest way to do this is to keep a food diary or record for a week. Keep track of everything you consume. You may be shocked at how much sugar is in things like soda, ice cream, and other things that may have become a staple for your diet.

Like most neuropathy patients, you probably know you should be eating better.

When neuropathy patients write all of this down, changes are much easier for us to help you with.

Always remember, neuropathy is oftentimes a manifestation, or made worse by poor metabolism, secondary to poor diet and lack of enough activity.

Improving both of these can often improve most forms of peripheral neuropathy!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Common Sense Approach to Neuropathy Treatment

Would you hit a Fly with a Sledgehammer?

Of course not. It’s just common sense!

Then why are clinicians prescribing invasive methods of treatment for any condition before more simple and often times old fashioned common sense methods?

Why has so much about modern healthcare, for what were once relatively simple to manage conditions, become just like this?

One relatively recent example was highlighted by the deaths and serious infections due to contamination of steroids and drugs administered for back pain and spinal injections.

Of course I’m not saying these don’t have a place. They do.

What I have issue with is when invasive methods of treatment for any condition are prescribed before more simple and often times old fashioned common sense methods of management for spine pain including modified rest, exercise, traction, physical therapy, spinal manipulation, and noninvasive therapy modalities.

The same could also be said for many of the other conditions that we now treat with drugs instead of lifestyle and behaviors FIRST.  This includes GERD, minor depression, sleep disturbance, fibromyalgia, and other forms of chronic pain.

Furthermore, third-party payers and insurance companies do not help the situation because often reimbursement is provided for invasive and expensive procedures while these modalities are simply considered “not medically necessary”. There is no common sense in any of this!

I’m old enough to remember when this was never the case. Unfortunately, it’s also been very difficult to change. However there are some things you can do.

First of all, always inquire about inexpensive and noninvasive procedures when considering any healthcare choice. This is especially true in spine pain and peripheral neuropathy.

For example, too often patients with peripheral neuropathy are treated with expensive medications with significant side effects before exploring possible underlying causes that are easily correctable such as obesity and metabolic syndrome.

And very often patients tell us the side effects from the treatment with medications and invasive injections for pain are worse than the disorder itself!

But there are some things you can do, and one of them you’re doing right now.

And that is to learn everything you can to become your own health care advocate.

Now this is a situation that also has significant ties to politics and government, I’ll let you have those discussions on your own.

However if you like my input, I’m more than happy to contribute!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Personal Choices in Obesity Related Neuropathy

Food supply is a doubled edged sword. As little as 50 years ago, foods in some areas of the modern world were in short supply. Modern food processing and even food “manufacturing” has changed all that.

Food itself is far more plentiful for most people than at any time in our history. And that unfortunately has created lots of problems.

Obesity, diabetes and a very common form of peripheral neuropathy are very closely linked. Neuropathy and diabetes are both much more common now a days, and showing up in younger ages than ever before in our modern world.

 

Along with supply, has come a huge increase in the “density” of calories. A calorie is a simple measure of energy potential in what we eat and drink. An average healthy person may only need around 2000 calories per day. But the problem is, its possible to eat (very easily) way more than that, even in 1 meal! Yikes!

So, this means that a cup of a processed food for example can have 3 times the calories and fewer nutrients than a cup of say steamed vegetables, or even lean protein.

And consume these foods long enough before you know it you’ve packed on 20, 40, 60 or more pounds and neuropathy, diabetes and heart disease can and often do result.

Recently, there has been a wave of politicians attempting to legislate better health habits. What a theft of personal choice that is!

Just consider the proposals made by Mayor Bloomberg, and others who wanted to ban sales of certain foods! Quite frankly I’m appalled.

Aren’t we big boys and girls any more? Can we still teach our kids right from wrong? Behavior has consequences!

Real empowerment in neuropathy or any disease comes from the choices you and I make every day. The good news is progress from food companies is being made. Slow, but real.

I’m rather about adults learning what’s best and teaching our children better personal choices every day!

How about you?

I once had the opportunity to interview the famous Hank Cardello, a former food executive and the author of “Stuffed”.

Listen in as Hank and I discuss the Obesity Epidemic and The Food Industry…

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy Treatments, Pills, and Potions!

“Just start taking my magic formula and your neuropathy can be GONE!”

Good neuropathy treatment is usually not as simple as taking or rubbing on just one thing.

If only neuropathy treatment was that simple. Or easy.

Now that is not to say that supplements and lotions can’t have a role in good neuropathy treatment. The fact is they often do.

But good neuropathy treatment is usually not as simple as taking or rubbing on just one thing.

Many neuropathy patients don’t know that some supplements should not be taken with drugs. For example, CoQ-10 can be trouble, and should not be taken if you are on Coumadin.

Acetyl-L-Carnitine can interfere with thyroid function, and its use needs to be professionally monitored. This is especially true if you take thyroid medications.

And the list goes on. It seems like some new neuropathy formula is being offered every day! Neuropathy patients need to be very careful.

So what is the he best thing a neuropathy treatment patient should do? Find a neuropathy treatment professional to work with. Find out all you can about them. Are they up on the latest techniques? Are they aware of drugs that may interact with their therapy?

Help treat your neuropathy by providing all your lab and medical records. If your neuropathy is associated with any food or skin allergies, we need to know that too.

Let us know about your family history. Have you had recent surgery, or anesthesia, which can make neuropathy symptoms worse?

Have you tried any neuropathy treatments and what have the results been? What seems to make your neuropathy feel better, and especially does anything you do seem to make it worse?

This is all part of having a neuropathy treatment plan. If you have any questions about what good neuropathy treatment is, ask your trained neuropathy treatment professional.

But just make sure they have actually studied in and are trained in the neuropathy treatment specialty!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

How Behavior Affects Neuropathy

Does My Behavior Affect My Neuropathy?”

“Wow. You mean how I act around my family, and even my health care professionals has an impact on my peace of mind, my health and maybe even my neuropathy treatment?”

In a word, yes! This may be a very difficult discussion for some, but a very important one. In the clinic, we call this “illness behavior”.

Lets break it down. When you were a little kid, you likely got those scrapes from falling down, or maybe the assault from a bully, or even something worse. Just like me you learned that being “sick” certainly brings more attention to us. And in an emergency, rightly so!

But NOT letting the correct people know you need help in a crisis is just as bad!

Problems arise when we carry these inappropriate learned behaviors from childhood over into adulthood. Often it begins subconsciously. Being diagnosed with a new health problem, like peripheral neuropathy, having a genetic disease or major accident is life changing.

These all require a period of time to uncover real choices, treatment options, etc. And in neuropathy treatments especially this is true now more than ever as more and more neuropathy claims are being made.

Here’s my point. When we display illness behaviors, the biggest negative effect is on ourselves! If we tell our subconscious mind how sick we are, what do we get? More sickness!

This in no way demeans anyone suffering from a serious or life threatening disease. But plenty of studies even involving really sick patients tell us as neuropathy treatment specialists that when you have a healthier outlook, and a healthy set of behaviors to match, the greater the chance we have at doing really well with your treatment success!

We also know that our attitudes and behaviors affect our immune systems, our sleep, and yes even our aging process.

We also know that even in really severe illness, our behaviors have a huge impact.

If you’d like another perspective, watch at the link below as I talk for 3 minutes about the theory of learned helplessness…

Feeling Helpless?

And the most difficult but important behavior of all?

Asking for professional and spiritual guidance, or in a word: acceptance.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

The Second Step in Neuropathy Treatment

Recently we talked about the very first step in dealing with neuropathy, and really any major life challenge. Pain is something nobody welcomes into his or her life.

In last week’s discussion, you heard Mal Duane and I talk about a different approach to treating neuropathy patients than you may have expected. And I bet you don’t about hear it from your friends who do not suffer neuropathy, and maybe even your own doctors.

Simply put, we spoke about regaining a sense of control. Just taking some really very basic steps. You see, so much of modern health care is still about what can doctors do for us, when instead we should be asking ourselves daily “Am I doing my part and what else should I be doing?

Or not doing.

In the clip below, I spoke with Lara Amaral about chronic pain, inflammation and neuropathy, their causes, and what you can do to help yourself deal with many forms of chronic pain.

Dr John Hayes Jr Discusses Healthy Habits, Neuropathy and Pain

So if regaining control is the first step, then “action” is the second step. A game plan in any of life’s goals, backed up by great coaches and cheerleaders, is so important to all of us, whether we admit it or not.

Action is what allows us to actually maintain the control we start out with! And it could be the simplest step!  For example, today, it’s no more soda. Next week is cutting the poor foods out of our diet. Even if these steps have to be taken one by one.

Think about that. Don’t you feel better with each good thing you do just for you, just because it’s the right thing to do?

But we can’t have one without the other. Intention without action is wasted life energy. To do so is inviting failure.

And I know that’s not what you want from your neuropathy treatments.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

What In-Home Neuropathy Treatment Can Do for You

Sadly, many of the most common neuropathy treatments are only about hiding some of the miserable symptoms.

One of the things I like most about what I do as a neuropathy treatment professional and writer is hearing from all my wonderful friends and patients. This might be on the Facebook, Twitter, and of course Gmail.

It never fails, when I’m most looking for encouragement in the tough world of neuropathy treatment, friends like you always show up!

For that, I simply can’t thank you enough for having the courage to share your neuropathy treatment stories.

Neuropathy may be the most widespread and poorly understood health issue of our day, and this seems to get worse all the time!

And now, the Internet makes this a bigger problem. But don’t get me wrong, good information about neuropathy treatment is helpful for sure.

Sometimes, I hear about your neuropathy treatment successes. Often you tell me how much our talking together every couple days helps you get through your neuropathy pain, numbness, and burning.

But all too often, I hear only about neuropathy treatment failures!

This of course is why you are reading this today!

You see, most common neuropathy treatments are only about hiding some of the miserable symptoms. Or the pain, sleeplessness or tingling, as if that’s all that neuropathy is.

There is a common misconception that just following this diet, taking this supplement or that drug, is all you need to do to ease your neuropathy.

Almost nothing is ever said in most neuropathy treatment circles about making your nerves actually work as good as they can again!

Of course, this is different for each neuropathy patient, depending upon the cause of your neuropathy.

One of the most amazing things about our work in the neuropathy treatment clinic is the discovery that in many neuropathy patient’s, nerves are much more “plastic” than we ever thought possible.

This means, that nerves are not always “dead” as some doctors and therapists may believe. But not all neuropathy treatments work! And nothing works for everybody.

When proper treatment can be done, results can be life changing!

So what I am going in our upcoming series of articles is to talk about home care and professionally applied neuropathy treatments that really do work.

Most importantly, I’ll tell you why I think they do!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy and Exercise

For some, the prospect of neuropathy and exercise may seem not only unrealistic but an almost ironic misplacement of priorities.  Exercise is important for everyone, though, neuropathy and exercise can help control blood sugar and actually slow down the progression and symptoms of the condition!

Exercising regularly greatly decreases anyone’s risk of diabetic neuropathy, and has been shown to control symptoms and deterioration in sufferers by elevating overall blood flow to the limbs and controlling cardiovascular atrophy.  Depending on your specific type of neuropathy, areas affected, and the extent of the damage, you will have to adjust conventional workout routines to accommodate the condition.  Ask your NeuropathyDR® clinician if you have questions, and be sure to consult them before beginning any workout program.  Your clinician will inspect your feet and legs for signs of potential problems, and will help you make sure your shoes are properly fitted so as to avoid neuropathy-related injuries.

Additionally:

  • Use silica gel or air midsoles
  • Use polyester or polyester/cotton blend socks to keep your feet dry
  • Avoid any workout clothes that rub against your skin in the same area.

Ann Albright of the Division of Diabetes Translation in Atlanta cautions that neuropathy patients will want to steer clear of most repetitive or weight-bearing exercise, such as running, walking, or extensive weight training (although some sources advocate weight training as beneficial, in moderation).  So which exercises are the most beneficial while reducing risk?

Swimming is one of the best exercises, as it is an activity adaptable to any age, fitness level, or degree of neuropathy symptoms.  Swimming is also a full-body, “no-impact” workout, and so is less harmful to your joints, legs, and feet than most other forms of exercise, without sacrificing circulation (ask any lap swimmer and they’ll tell you—swimming has no problem getting your heart rate up!)  As such, it is highly recommended for almost anyone.

Bicycling, rowing, and use of a stationary bicycle are other excellent, low-impact activities that can be safely integrated into a neuropathy treatment program. Some organizations have even developed exercise programs for senior citizens suffering from neuropathy, incorporating a heavy emphasis on seated exercises.

If you don’t have regular access to facilities or equipment for more extensive exercise, there are some basic exercises you can do almost anywhere that can help your neuropathy!  Here are some to try:

  • For your hands, touch the pad of your thumb with your index finger, running the finger down to the base of your thumb. Then, repeat the movement with the index, middle, ring, and little fingers. Do this exercise several times.
  • For your legs and feet, straighten one knee and point your foot.  Flex your ankle five times, then circle your foot five times in each direction, clockwise and counterclockwise.
  • To increase balance, try this exercise: from a standing position, rise up slowly on your tiptoes, and then rock backward onto your heels. Keep your knees straight, but try not to lock them.

Additional precautions are vital for neuropathy patients to observe.  After every workout session, patients should remember to check their feet and any relevant extremities for blisters, irritation, or sores. These could be vulnerable to infections, which themselves could elevate risk for amputation.

It is important for neuropathy sufferers to be mindful of their heart rate and blood pressure.  Especially if you suffer from autonomic neuropathy, which can greatly increase risk of heart failure or cardiac arrest, be aware of your limitations when it comes to safe exercise.  Don’t worry—there’s a way for everyone to exercise safely.  If you have any doubts, consult your NeuropathyDR® clinician to review your workout plan.

Finally, be sure to monitor your body temperature.  Neuropathy sufferers are at high risk when it comes to overheating, since some types of neuropathy can reduce the body’s ability to temperature-control.  Consult your clinician if sweating seems overly profuse or the opposite, less than normal.

If you have any questions about neuropathy and exercise, contact us at NeuropathyDR or call
7781-659-7989

We can answer your questions and help put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician who can help you in person.  Have a great workout!

 

http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5162775_exercise-peripheral-neuropathy.html

http://journal.diabetes.org/diabetesspectrum/98v11n4/pg231.htm

http://www.livestrong.com/article/99573-exercise-peripheral-neuropathy/

http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20189334,00.html

http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20188832,00.html

 

Neuropathy and Sleep

It’s four in the morning and you’re still awake.  You’ve been in bed, and you should have been asleep ages ago.  Your alarm will go off in only a few hours, and you’re dreading the long day ahead that you’ll have to spend completely exhausted.

If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy, this scenario is probably all too familiar.  Insomnia (lack of sleep) affects almost half of the overall population, but among neuropathy sufferers, that ratio jumps to over seventy percent.  Experts recommend between seven and nine hours of sleep for most adults, regardless of their age or gender, an intimidating goal if you’re someone whose chronic pain keeps them up at night.

Neuropathic pain can intensify in the evening hours, both in reality and in perception (fewer distractions of the day can cause a sufferer to focus more on their pain the closer they get to bedtime).

There Is No Substitute For A Caring NeuropathyDR Professional To Guide You…

Research suggests that sleep apnea, a common cause of insomnia, can actually cause peripheral neuropathy, as well.  Beyond a mere relationship, studies have shown that apnea is a high-risk condition among the insulin-resistant, which could likely be affecting incidents of neuropathy among diabetics in very direct ways.

Insomnia from neuropathy can perpetuate its own problem, too.  Not only is neuropathic pain prodigious when it comes to nighttime restlessness, but the resulting lack of sleep can make the pain even worse!  Rest is essential to recovery and treatment, and lack of sleep can lower your pain threshold drastically.  You need that sleep, so what can you do?

There are several steps you can take if your neuropathy is keeping you awake at night.  Your NeuropathyDR® clinician can work with you to best help your specific situation, but here are some guidelines to get you started:

  • Do your best to keep a regular sleeping schedule.  Be persistent! Getting to bed and getting up at the same times each day is one of the best ways to train your body to sleep correctly.
  • Limit your intake of caffeine and any medication that incorporates a stimulant (non-drowsy), especially in the evening hours.
  • Avoid heavy foods in the evening. Our bodies metabolize food for hours after we eat, giving us a boost of energy!  Energy is great when we need it, but can be a pain when we don’t.  Many cultures eat their biggest meal of the day in the morning and only a small snack at dinnertime for this reason.  Try it out!
  • Try turning off the TV and computer a few hours before bed.  Mileage varies from person to person, but electronics tend to stimulate the senses.   Try a book or quiet conversation, instead.
  • Adjust your environment to be ideal for sleeping.  Layer your covers to ensure you stay warm but not hot, and minimize light and noise.

There are a number of herbal and natural sleep aids as well, which may help you fall asleep quickly.  Sleep expert Elizabeth Shannon recommends entertaining a number of stress-relief methods, psychological conditioning, and homeopathic solutions for insomnia before resorting to pharmaceutical sleep aids, which can often form dependencies and, over time, exacerbate the problems associated with restlessness.  Always be cautious with medications, and consult your NeuropathyDR® clinician or other doctor before medicating.

Always remember, altering your sleep pattern won’t happen overnight (so to speak)!  It could be three to four weeks before any changes you make to your routine begin to have meaningful impact on your success getting to and staying asleep, and don’t be surprised if your restlessness gets worse before it gets better.

Contact us at NeuropathyDR and we can help you find a NeuropathyDR® clinician in your area and give you even more information about how to get the rest you need while suffering from neuropathy.

http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/content/159/1/213.full

http://www.webmd.com/brain/understanding-peripheral-neuropathy-basics

http://www.sleeplessnomore.com/

http://www.neuropathy.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=8145&news_iv_ctrl=1221

 

Peripheral Neuropathy and Your Quality of Life

If you’re suffering from peripheral neuropathy, you know how much it affects your life.

Every single day…

Even the simplest tasks can be difficult if not impossible…

To anyone unfamiliar with peripheral neuropathy and its symptoms, they might just think “your nerves hurt a little…”

But at a peripheral neuropathy sufferer, you know better…

Peripheral neuropathy not only affects your health, it can wreck your quality of life.

The ND Clinician is a Highly Trained Specialist

The ND Clinician is Highly Trained To Help You!

How Do You Define Quality of Life?

Generally speaking, Quality of Life is a term used to measure a person’s overall well-being. In medical terms, it usually means how well a patient has adapted to a medical condition.  It measures[1]:

  • Your physical and material well being
  • Your social relationships – how you interact with others
  • Your social activities
  • Your personal fulfillment – your career, any creative outlets you may have, how involved you are with other interests)
  • Your recreational activities – your hobbies, sports, etc.
  • Your actual health – what your health is really like and how healthy you believe you are

How do you feel about these aspects of your life?  Your attitude and approach to your illness, both your neuropathy and the underlying cause of your neuropathy (i.e., diabetes, HIV/AIDS, lupus, etc.) can make a huge difference in how well you adapt to your neuropathy symptoms.

Neuropathy Symptoms Aren’t Just Physical

The pain of peripheral neuropathy falls into the category of what is considered chronic pain.  It usually doesn’t just come and go.  You can’t just pop a couple of aspirin and forget about it.  It’s pain with its root cause in nerve damage.

The nerves that actually register pain are the actual cause of the pain.  When you’re in that kind of pain on a consistent basis, it affects you in many different ways[2]:

  • You become depressed and/or anxious
  • Your productivity and interest at work is disrupted
  • You can’t sleep
  • It’s difficult for you to get out and interact with other people so you feel isolated
  • You sometimes don’t understand why you’re not getting better

What You Can Do To Improve Your Quality of Life

You may feel like your situation is hopeless, especially if you’ve become mired in depression.

But it isn’t.

There are things you can do to lessen the physical (and emotional) effects of peripheral neuropathy and help you function as normally as possible:

  • Pay special attention to caring for your feet.  Inspect them daily for cuts, pressure spots, blisters or calluses (use a mirror to look at the bottom of your feet).   The minute you notice anything out of the ordinary, call your doctor or your local NeuropathyDR® clinician for help.  Never go barefoot – anywhere.
  • Treat yourself to a good foot massage to improve your circulation and reduce pain.  Check with your insurance company – if massage is actually prescribed by your doctor, they may cover some of the cost.
  • Only wear shoes that are padded, supportive and comfortable and never wear tight socks.
  • If you smoke, quit.  Nicotine decreases circulation and if you’re a peripheral neuropathy patient, you can’t risk that.
  • Cut back on your caffeine intake.  Several studies have found that caffeine may actually make neuropathy pain worse.
  • If you sit at a desk, never cross your knees or lean on your elbows.  The pressure will only make your nerve damage worse.
  • Be really careful when using hot water.  Your peripheral neuropathy may affect the way you register changes in temperature and it’s really easy for you to burn yourself and not even realize it.
  • Use a “bed cradle” to keep your sheets away from your feet if you experience pain when trying to sleep.  That will help you rest.
  • Try to be as active as possible.  Moderate exercise is great for circulation and it can work wonders for your emotional and mental health.
  • Make your home as injury proof as possible – install bath assists and/or hand rails and never leave anything on the floor that you can trip over.
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet.  If you don’t know what you should and shouldn’t eat, talk to your NeuropathyDR® clinician about a personalized diet plan to maintain proper weight and give your body what it needs to heal.
  • Try to get out as often as possible to socialize with others.

We hope this information helps you to better manage your peripheral neuropathy symptoms.  Take a look at the list above and see how many of these things you’re already doing to help yourself. Then talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician about help with adding the others to your daily life.

For more information on improving your quality of life when dealing with peripheral neuropathy, get our Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.