Gluten Neuropathy

Could Gluten and Neuropathy be Connected?

All of us can remember at some point in time, walking into a bakery or kitchen where fresh breads and pastries were being made.

The aroma can be overwhelming and draws us in like magnets.

Now once upon a time most especially when human beings were extremely physically active, bread was in fact the staff of life. There was no problem consuming massive amounts of carbohydrates as long as it was consumed during physical activity.

Well Flash Forward 300 years and the situation is now, entirely different. Not only are we less active but grains are often heavily processed, grown on nutrient deficient soils, or perhaps even GMO.

Breads and pastries are also sources of extremely high carbohydrate levels. In fact a sandwich can have 40 to 60 grams of carbohydrates!

And this has had an effect on neuropathy and our health in general.

With neuropathy, however, the stakes are higher. Gluten can and does cause celiac disease.

Sometimes in celiac disease, the only presentation is a gluten neuropathy.

Most of the time, however, it’s a simple fact that gluten can aggravate our bellies at the least and yes even our aches and pains, including neuropathy.

You see gluten is a gooey protein. That’s what gives bread that wonderful texture.

But most of us who stop eating gluten on regular basis find out quickly how much better we feel.

It appears that this is because even those of us who don’t have celiac disease and even test negative for allergy to gluten, may still be “sensitive”.

In patients suffering from gluten neuropathy, as well as in other patients, it appears that gluten may actually trigger inflammatory reactions. This adds to pain, stiffness, and possibly neuropathy symptoms.

However the evidence is not conclusive, and there are many that would argue this point.

What I can tell you, as a clinician, is that many patients feel so much better we feel it’s worth a try.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

Chronic Pain Answers

If you suffer from chronic pain the first thing you should do is reach out and look for answers.

As a clinician, the most common problems that present to us in private practice usually involve the skeletal system. For example, headaches and low back pain are the two most common chronic pain complaints heard by many primary care and medical practices.

This true for both acute or new health conditions and but especially chronic conditions.

Now I define chronic conditions as those that have lasted more than six months and have not effectively been treated or managed.

One only has to look at television ads and yes even newspapers from over hundreds of years ago to realize there is nothing new or unique here!

Let’s face it, some pains are just part of life. But when chronic pains and other annoying symptoms become long-term and interfere with our quality of live, they can have devastating consequences.

Now obviously, very little can be done about devastating accidents and injuries. Unfortunately, this is a real and unpleasant fact. Bad things can and do happen to all of us.

So even though we know that the best way to prevent chronic disabling pain is to treat pain appropriately is from the beginning.

This involves much more than just medication. In fact, this is a team effort.

Most of the time pain management should include some type of physical therapy. Physical therapy, chiropractic and other physical therapy is often extremely beneficial especially when applied early on for many types of chronic pain.

This does not mean that chronic pain is not treatable. It just becomes more difficult.

Chronic pain needs to be handled by very experienced physicians and physical therapists. In order to be truly effective long-term, a good portion of this care should include non-drug treatment methods.

And that is in fact what we do every day, all day long in our treatment centers.

So, if you suffer from chronic pain the first thing you should do is reach out and look for answers.

Don’t take no for an answer until you have left no stone unturned!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy and Chronic Pain: Developing a Schedule

Scheduled physical activity every day can improve neuropathy and other chronic pain.

One of the things we find in our practices is that patients who tend to keep tight schedules do extremely well managing and ultimately defeating chronic pain.

More specifically when we work with these patients even recovering from neuropathy, fibromyalgia, spinal stenosis, and yes even more serious illnesses, we find there is scheduled physical activity every day.

In fact, it may be one the most challenging things you do. But it could also be one of the most rewarding.

The reason for this is our bodies work on set schedules.

Did you know that even such things like body temperature and alertness, etc. all run on internal schedules and cycles?

This also helps explain why those who schedule things such as meals, physical activity, self-treatment with your home-care and clinic-care, do far better!

Otherwise, especially in this modern world, the tendency is to drift aimlessly. And yes, even things such as our computers, social groups, and social media can wind up being distractions using a vast majority of our time.

Unfortunately, this tends to happen more not less as we get older, retire, become disabled, or move away from daily structure.

The bottom line is it is not healthy.

So here’s where I recommend you begin today. Start by outlining what an ideal day looks like for you.

What time do you get up? What do you have for breakfast that makes you feel the best?

Most of our neuropathy and chronic pain patients find that adhering to the NeuropathyDR diet and eating schedule goes a long way towards keeping them productive.

This is because the NeuropathyDR diet will allow you to maintain more even blood sugars and thus your energy level and mental alertness.

Next, regardless of your fitness or illness level, some type of scheduled physical activity is critical.

We are here If you need help developing a more productive schedule.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

The NeuropathyDR Diet and Chronic Pain Reduction Guide

How to keep what you’re eating from eating you? The key is beginning and staying with this neuropathy diet program! One of the questions we frequently get, as neuropathy and pain patients begin to understand the impact their diet has on overall health, is, “What do I eat, and when?” So, what I’m doing today is to describe a typical day of meals and snacks for a patient who is following the NeuropathyDR Diet, which is relatively easy to modify and add variety to on a regular basis.

Let’s start with Breakfast

It is very important to consume some protein within one half hour of arising. The reason for this is that it helps stimulate metabolism, protein synthesis, and mental alertness. It also helps us burn fuel more efficiently. My favorite breakfast is a vegetable protein shake, using a dairy-free protein powder with almond or coconut milk. Another good breakfast is a serving of gluten-free granola, taking care to keep carbohydrates between 15 and 20g maximum. You could also use a measured serving of gluten-free steel-cut oatmeal.

No more than three hours later, have a snack again, not exceeding 15g of carbs. This could include one half apple or banana, seven or eight almonds for other nuts, etc… Packaged protein or nut bars can be fine if the carb content is low.

Lunch should universally be some form of salad with protein

You can mix this up with your favorite greens. You could use baby spinach or mixes greens. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil, a few almonds or walnuts, and lean protein such as tuna, salmon, chicken, or turkey. If you are vegan or vegetarian, you could use tofu or tempeh.

No more than three hours later, have an additional snack, just like your mid-morning.

When dinnertime comes, this is the time to emphasize non-starchy vegetables

Some of the best are cooked spinach, broiled or sautéed asparagus, cabbage, beets, squashes, yams, and sweet potatoes, and so on. Keep starches, such as rice and white potatoes, to a minimum.

Be sure to get in a high-quality source of protein. Don’t be afraid to try things like hormone-free pork, beef, or, if available, fresh fish. Again, you could use a vegan alternative, just be careful of gluten and carb content.

Not more than three hours after dinner, have another snack.

This time, try a few gluten-free crackers with some almond butter. You can also try some sliced tofu. There are also low carbohydrate gluten-free cookies—just be careful not to eat the entire bag, which is easy to do! Another really good choice to satisfy your evening cravings is a small square of unsweetened dark chocolate.

So, what’s NOT here?

Well there is no dairy, cheese, or yogurt. There is no bread; there are no snack foods, soda, or chips. There are no ice creams or pies for dessert. There are no fruit juices, candy, or other sweets.

Do you see where we are going here? The fact of the matter is the above list of foods is probably responsible for more ill health and disease than any other single factor in the modern developed world.

The key is beginning and staying with the program. Don’t worry about the very rare weekend, or party. Just always stay trying not to go berserk. Be especially careful during holiday periods.

Consume half your body weight in ounces of clear liquids, most especially water, during plenty any 24-hour period.

Be especially careful not to overdo coffee and tea. Limit alcohol consumption to occasional low sugar wine or beer, and very rarely stronger adult beverages.

Once you make a shift, you will realize how simple, easy, and inexpensive this approach to eating–for neuropathy patients and anyone else–can be!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Gluten Sensitivity and Peripheral Neuropathy

Your  Neuropathy Nutrition Should Include Vitamin D

Gluten free bakeries…

Gluten free cereals…

Totally gluten free diets…

You can’t look through a magazine or turn on the TV these days without seeing something about the benefits of going gluten free in your diet.

Going gluten-free is more than just the latest fad diet.

Especially for the growing number of people with celiac disease (aka gluten sensitivity)[1].

If you’re one of those people, you’re probably all too familiar with the symptoms of celiac disease:

  • Anemia
  • Change in weight
  • Chronic diarrhea or constipation (or both)
  • General weakness
  • Oily, foul-smelling stools
  • Stomach problems, cramping, gas, distention, bloating, vomiting

Those symptoms all make sense when you understand exactly what celiac disease is.

What is Celiac Disease?

Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that damages the lining of the small intestine.  If you have celiac disease, eating foods that contain gluten – a protein found in wheat and other grains – starts a reaction in your autoimmune system that directly affects the small intestine.  Without treatment, celiac disease can lead to cancer, anemia, seizures, osteoporosis – any of these can be fatal.

Since celiac disease directly affects the small intestine, digestive issues make perfect sense.  But what about these symptoms:

  • Burning, tingling and numbness in hands and feet
  • Loss of feeling in hands and feet
  • Numbness, tingling or reduced sensation in the face and body

The Celiac Disease – Peripheral Neuropathy Connection

At first glance, it’s hard to make the connection between gluten sensitivity and peripheral neuropathy.  A recent study discovered that about 10% of people with celiac disease had peripheral neuropathy symptoms before their digestive system issues appeared.  For that reason, many people who have peripheral neuropathy symptoms with no other indicators for neuropathy, should be checked for celiac disease as a possible cause of their peripheral neuropathy.

The best thing you can do for yourself is contact a neuropathy specialist, like your local NeuropathyDr® clinician, to undergo the appropriate testing to find out if celiac disease is causing your peripheral neuropathy.

Testing and Evaluation

If you have peripheral neuropathy and/or celiac disease symptoms and haven’t been tested for one or both of these conditions, this is what you can expect.

To determine if you have peripheral neuropathy, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will conduct a thorough neurological examination, electromyography and nerve conduction tests.

If you determine that you have neuropathy and you don’t have any other underlying potential cause, the next step will be to test you for celiac disease.  Those tests will include blood tests and possibly a biopsy of the lining of your small intestine.

Living with Celiac Disease and Peripheral Neuropathy

Once your testing is completed, if you have celiac disease your NeuropathyDR® clinician will work with you to manage your condition.  In order to manage your celiac disease symptoms you will need to:

  • Follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life[2]
  • Avoid all foods containing wheat
  • Avoid other grains that contain gluten (rye, barley and oats – that means no pasta, grains, cereals and many processed foods).

To help cope with your peripheral neuropathy symptoms caused by your celiac disease, you should:

  • Stop taking any medications that cause peripheral neuropathy (like statins to lower cholesterol)
  • Modify your lifestyle to reduce your pain – like avoiding standing or walking for extended periods of time
  • Wear looser shoes
  • Soak your feet in ice water
  • Take pain medications prescribed by your NeuropathyDR® clinician
  • Take safety precautions to compensate for your inability to feel sensation in your feet and hands
  • Ask your NeuropathyDr® clinician about special therapeutic shoes that may be covered by insurance or Medicare

Celiac disease and peripheral neuropathy can wreak havoc on your body.  Talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician to take steps to minimize the ill effects of both your conditions.

For more information on coping with celiac disease and peripheral neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com


Neuropathy and Fructose

Neuropathy and FructoseFat mature man measuring his belly with measurement tape

Much has been written about consuming processed foods and drinks laced with the sugar known as fructose.  But why is this simple product, which is often times billed as all natural food or sweetner such a troublemaker?

Mainly because fructose does not “burn” like other sugars. In fact fructose is only about 60% efficient in converting to simpler molecules. So this means 40% or so fructose gets converted to fat!

Yikes!

This also explains why those who consume the excess amounts of fructose common to modern diets have a very difficult time managing their weight.

The biggest offender of course is soda.

As we’ve written about before there is no reason that anybody with their eye on health or disease prevention should ever be consuming soda. This also includes artificial and calorie free sweeteners in soda, other drinks and foods.

Even a zero calorie soda that tastes sweet to your body WILL still create a weight gain situation!

Fructose can also be found in high amounts in fruits. This is why many people who go on the so called “fruit” diets or drink a lot of fruit juices have a very difficult time controlling blood sugar and losing weight or keeping weight off.

It’s also why our diet plan is carbohydrate controlled and this includes limiting serving sizes of fruits.

Typically, a serving size of fruit would be one half banana, one half or one small apple, pear etc. Generally, berries unless overripe are not so much a problem. Melon, again when consumed in moderation are usually not a problem either.

Remember we are having this conversation about fructose and neuropathy treatment because it is obesity, metabolic syndrome and prediabetes which are at the cause of over 50% of idiopathic cases of neuropathy and these also complicate many forms of chronic pain.

Taming your fructose consumption is just one thing but big thing you can do right now to improve the quality of your life both short and long term!

Let us help!

Join us here all day long.

 

Neuropathy Treatment Challenge

Portrait of Doctor

Neuropathy Treatment Challenge

As you probably know actually working with and effectively treating neuropathy can be extraordinarily challenging. Neuropathy is almost never an isolated symptom. Very rarely does it occur just by itself. It is so often the result of many different causes and other conditions.

Fortunately, the most common cause is correctable. As you have read here before the most common cause of neuropathy is prediabetes also known as metabolic syndrome or Syndrome X. This is a lifestyle disorder often caused by years of weight gain, aggravated by cigarette smoking, and inactivity.

The underlying conditions related to other forms of neuropathy such as genetic types can by very challenging!

But there are some truths that are common to all of these types of neuropathy in many forms of chronic pain.

And that is drug only therapy serves to simply mask the symptoms and not treat the underlying illness.
Too often patients who suffer from #neuropathy, #fibromyalgia and other forms of chronic pain can go on this pattern for many years before effective treatment is actually implemented.

This neuropathy and chronic pain treatment of course centers around improving our overall level of health and well being! Physically, mentally, and spiritually. Cleaning up our diets, getting on appropriate exercise programs and minimizing medications is better long term approach.

You must at all costs avoid prolonged self-treatment for pain or other annoying symptoms!

It is not unusual now that we see patients taking large amounts of self-prescribed over-the-counter drugs ending up with liver kidney damage and sometimes organ failure.

Don’t let this be you! Yes of course some medications are necessary to help with pain but using them only to the exclusion of other good self-care is a sure path down the road to disaster.

It’s very important that you take the most appropriate steps to actually improve your underlying health and function as quickly as possible.

Let Our Team of Clinicians Help!

Be Sure To Join us all day on Facebook!

 

Postherpetic Neuropathy (Pain After Shingles)

A NeuropathyDR specialist is here to help you with your Postherpetic Neuropathy Including nutrition and diet plan.

Postherpetic Neuropathy: Nutrition and Diet Plan

When you were diagnosed with shingles, you thought that as soon as the rash disappeared you would be free and clear…

You didn’t count on the nerve damage and pain you’re still dealing with.

The pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

You’re frustrated…depressed…irritable.

Yes, you know you can take pain medications to help ease some of the discomfort but you don’t want to do that forever.

The good news is that there are other things you can do to help your body heal.  With a little patience, perseverance and the help of medical professionals well versed in dealing with postherpetic neuropathy, like your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, you can live a normal life again.

It Starts With Good Nutrition

The human body is a very well designed machine.  If you put junk into it, you get junk out of it.  But if you give it what it needs to function properly and to repair itself, the results can be awe inspiring.

The very first thing you need to do is make sure you’re giving your body the right tools to fight back against postherpetic neuropathy.  And that means a healthy diet.

Your diet should include[1]:

–           Whole grains and legumes to provide B vitamins to promote nerve health.  Whole grains promote the production of serotonin in the brain and will increase your feeling of well-being.

–           Fish and eggs for additional vitamins B12 and B1.

–           Green, leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, and other greens) for calcium and magnesium.   Both of these nutrients are vital to healthy nerve endings and health nerve impulse  transmission and, as an added bonus, they give your immune system a boost.

–           Yellow and orange fruits and vegetables (such as squash, carrots, yellow and orange bell  peppers, apricots, oranges, etc.) for vitamins A and C to help repair your skin and boost  your immune system.

–           Sunflower seeds (unsalted), avocados, broccoli, almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, peanuts (unsalted), tomatoes and tomato products, sweet potatoes and fish for vitamin E to promote skin health and ease the pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

–           Ask your neuropathy specialist for recommendations on a good multivitamin and mineral supplement to fill in any gaps in your nutrition plan.

Foods you should avoid[2]:

–           Coffee and other caffeinated drinks.

–           Fried foods and all other fatty foods.  Fatty foods suppress the immune system and that’s the last thing you need when you’re fighting postherpetic neuropathy.

–           Cut back on animal protein.  That’s not to say you should become a vegetarian.  Just limit the amount of animal protein you take in.  High-protein foods elevate the amount of  dopamine and norepinephrine which are both tied to high levels of anxiety and stress.

–           Avoid drinking alcohol.  Alcohol consumption limits the ability of the liver to remove toxins from the body and can make a bad situation worse.

–           Avoid sugar.  You don’t have to eliminate sweets completely, just control them.  Sugar contains no essential nutrients and “gunks up” your system.  Keeping your blood sugar level constant will help control your irritability.

–           Control your salt intake.  Opt for a salt substitute with potassium instead of sodium and stay away from preserved foods like bacon, ham, pickles, etc.  Reducing the amount of  salt you eat will help ease inflammation and that alone will work wonders in the healing process.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ treatment specialist for a personalized diet plan to help you to help your body to heal with the right nutritional support for postherpetic neuropathy.

Give Your Body A Break by Managing Stress

We all know that stress is a killer.  But few of us really take steps to manage the stress in our lives.  By keeping your stress level under control, you give your body a chance to use the resources it was using to deal with stress to actually heal itself.

Some tips for managing your stress level:

–           Exercise regularly.  You don’t have to get out and run a marathon.  Just walk briskly for about 15 minutes a day, every day, to start.  You can build from there.

–           Employ relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, tai chi, yoga or meditation.  Any of these will calm the mind and, in turn, calm the body and nerves.

–          Find a hobby that will take your mind off your pain.
Ask your local NeuropathyDR™ clinician for suggestions and make stress management a part of your treatment plan to overcome postherpetic neuropathy. But remember, healing is a process not an event.  Be patient with yourself and start the healing process today.

We hope this gives you some tips to get started on the road to putting postherpetic neuropathy behind you.  Working with your medical team, including your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, to design a nutrition and treatment plan tailored to your specific needs is a great place to start.

For more information on recovering from shingles and postherpetic neuropathy, get our Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy”.


[1] http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/default.htm

[2] http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/sdisease/shingles/shingles.html

NDGen Nerve Stimulation For Chemotherapy Neuropathy Treatment

Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part II

Your local NeuropathyDR® specialist can help you understand Chemotherapy Neuropathy Treatments

 

NDGen Nerve Stimulation For Chemotherapy Neuropathy TreatmentLast time, we talked about some therapies that can help alleviate chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The precise combination of these complementary therapies in NeuropathyDR® protocol can bring relief from your peripheral neuropathy and put you back on the road to a full life.

Nutrition

As a cancer patient, you’re already familiar with the effects chemotherapy and other treatments can have on your digestive system. The side effects of cancer treatment can not only affect your ability to eat but they can also prevent your body from getting the nutrition you need to heal.

If you have cancer, you need to make sure you’re getting enough nutrients to prevent or reverse nutritional shortfalls, lessen the side effects of treatment and improve your quality of life.

If at all possible, you need to make sure you’re eating enough high calorie, high-protein foodto give your body proper nutrition. But sitting down and eating a big meal may not be possible. Try eating small meals or snacks frequently instead. Frequent small meals will give your body a steady supply of nutrients, be easier for your sensitive digestive system to handle and maintain a consistent blood sugar level. All of this will often make you feel much better.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician to discuss a meal plan that will give your body what it needs to repair the damage done by cancer treatment. Good nutrition will boost your immune system and let it do its job in fighting off illnesses brought on by the damage of chemotherapy.

NeuropathyDR® practitioners often use diet plans and our nutrition guidelines to complement their chiropractic and NDGen treatment protocols to treat the whole patient from the inside out.

Nerve Stimulation (Neurostimulation or NeuroStim)

Once a NeuropathyDR® course of treatment has been designed and a nutrition plan established, the final piece in the overall treatment of your post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy treatment plan is nerve stimulation.

There are several nerve stimulation techniques to help peripheral neuropathy patients. Our protocol that is having great success includes the NDGen Family of Neurostimulation Devices.

By employing electrical stimulation to the nerves, in a wave-like low frequency motion the nerves may be stimulated to heal wherever possible. This specialty treatment allows the nerves to communicate more normally again and that, in itself, seems to start the process of reversing some damage of peripheral neuropathy.

You may watch our Cancer Patients speak out at http://YouTube.com/NeuropathyDoctor

The combination of good NeuropathyDR® in-clinic care, nutrition and NDGen nerve stimulation and Laser/LED Therapy is showing great promise in helping post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients return to a pain free life, without the debilitating effects of post-chemotherapy peripheral  neuropathy.

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin D

Your Neuropathy Nutrition and Diet Should include Vitamin D

Yes, and this essential vitamin has a role in many other disorders too. Vitamin D is a key nutrient, responsible for many essential functions in human body.

What’s the Connection?

Perhaps the most significant functions are maintenance of bone mass and a powerful immune system. The more recent research suggests many additional roles for this key nutrient. We now know that when Vitamin D levels are low, widespread aches and pains plus more illnesses like flus and colds are common.

Yes, and maybe even neuropathy, both directly and indirectly.

Regarding infections, some researchers suggest we should be heading out vitamin D tablets as opposed to flu shots as they probably would be so much more effective, with minimal side effects.

But that’s another story for another time.

The neuropathy Vitamin D connection probably is because Vitamin D is necessary for the body to manufacture some key neurotropic factors.

Neurotropins as they are often called are substances produced by the body to help nerves repair, and whenever possible regenerate.

There are a number different things that can influence your own neurotropin production, including key nutrition components and therapies like low-frequency nerve stimulation.

In fact, the research is so significant here I am “bullish” on neurostimulator kits being tried for most neuropathy and pain patients.

This is why our homecare kits have become a very popular choice and work well the vast majority of the time. If you are new to Beating Neuropathy can find these at NeuropathyDR

So how much vitamin D is enough?

Well, United States says around 600 international units per day is fine, but European countries recommend levels much higher, on the order of a few thousand international units per day for most healthy adults.

So who is correct? I would definitely side with Europeans on this because research supports that most people do not get nearly enough vitamin D either from their diet, or sunlight exposure.

Personally, I recommend a minimum of 2500 units of supplemental Vitamin D per day combined with The NeuropathyDR Diet.

There are unfortunately no good plant sources of active vitamin D. (cholecaliferol).

The best dietary sources of vitamin D come from fish and fish oils.

But the most important advice I will leave you with today is to have your baseline levels of vitamin D checked, you and your healthcare providers must then determine the most optimum dosage for YOU!

Retest after the first 90 days to make sure your body is absorbing this key neuropathy nutrient properly.

You also need to be very careful because vitamin D can be toxic in very large amounts.

To learn more, check back with us frequently as we will update you periodically as the research indicates.

Join the conversation today on Facebook!

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

Your Neuropathy Nutrition Should include Vitamin B3

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

 

Vitamin B3, or niacin, is a nutrient that, like all vitamins, is essential to health, life and neuropathy nutrition. Vitamin B3 helps our bodies convert food into energy, burn fat properly, and is largely responsible for helping us feel energized!

Did you know that vitamin B3 is a common ingredient in energy drinks? The reason for this is simple. Without vitamin B3, or niacin, our body is unable to function. For many patients, it is lacking due to poor diet. Consuming a diet high in processed foods is likely to be low in niacin. Consuming alcohol can also lower vitamin B3 levels too.

In the neuropathy clinic, mild deficiencies of niacin are probably relatively common. Mild deficiencies probably show up in the neuropathy clinic as slowed metabolism.

Also very common are low levels of niacin, causing a decrease in tolerance to cold. This occurs in neuropathy and chronic pain patients too!

Niacin deficiency can cause the disease called pellagra. Pellagra is disease characterized by the three D’s: diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia.

In very severe niacin deficiencies, significant changes occur to the nervous system. These changes can show up as psychiatric symptoms and, as we mentioned earlier, dementia or brain disease.

More commonly, especially in modern society, are lower levels of niacin then are optimal, making worse some very common neuropathy treatment conditions, including high cholesterol and metabolic syndrome.

A proper neuropathy nutrition diet should include a good food sources of niacin include chicken, beef, and fish including tuna, salmon, and halibut. Many nuts are also high in niacin. Avocado and shiitake mushrooms are also high in niacin. Vitamin B3 as niacinamide is also a common ingredient in many multivitamins and other dietary supplements.

Since niacin is available in two different common forms (niacin and niacinamide), we recommend patients consume both forms in the same supplement.

The reason for this is they will tend to act somewhat differently, both having beneficial effects.

Measuring vitamin B3 levels requires a little more work than a simple blood test. Blood tests for niacin are often unreliable, so special urine tests need to be performed.

Like so many nutrients, it is important to remember that diet must be the number one method of obtaining proper nutrition. It is also critical to understand that each nutrient is just like a key instrument in a symphony.

And just like a symphony does not work when one instrument does not play properly, the same is true in nutrition–especially with neuropathy nutrition!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Start a Proper Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet Plan Today!

Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet

Get Started on a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan today!

Start a Proper Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet Plan Today!

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet. You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage.

One of the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12. Fight neuropathy by eating foods like meat, fish, and eggs that are all high in B vitamins. If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry! There are many kinds of fortified cereals that contain substantial amounts of B vitamins as well (in addition to supplements, which we’ll talk about in a moment).

The Mayo Clinic recommends a diet high in fruits and vegetables for people who suffer from neuropathy. Fruits and vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy. Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels. If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut fruit and vegetables at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for a neuropathic diet, according to neurology.com. A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy. Breakfast cereals, whole grains, vegetables and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy. Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. A variety of foods—skinless white-meat poultry, legumes, tofu, fish, and low-fat yogurt—are good sources of lean protein. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels. Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, and sardines are good for maintaining levels of Omega-3 acids, healthy fats the body needs but cannot produce on its own.

For specific types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time. For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage. Consult your NeuropathyDR® specialist for the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are eating? The easiest way is to keep a food journal. Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking. Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms! As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy. If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help! Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a nutritionist or qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements can also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration. Supplementing B Vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12, can help regulate your nutrient levels and prevent neuropathy symptoms. Supplementing with fish oil can help replenish Omega-3 fatty acids, which are important if you suffer from type-II diabetes. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult your NeuropathyDR® clinician for specific recommendations.

Contact us if you have any questions about a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan. We can help you find the information you need and put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician who can help you with this and other neuropathy-related questions!

Join our conversation today on Facebook by clicking HERE!

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/peripheral-neuropathy/DS00131/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies

http://www.foundationforpn.org/livingwithperipheralneuropathy/neuropathynutrition/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/82184-foods-fight-neuropathy/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/121841-nutrients-neuropathy/

Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Make your Neuropathy Treatment Plan Today!

Create your Neuropathy Treatment plan today

Those who use written neuropathy treatment plans have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

If you or someone you love suffers from peripheral neuropathy, you know how devastating this condition can be. You probably are also aware of the immense life changes a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy can bring.

But the good news is, as you read on these pages repeatedly there is a whole lot you can learn to better deal with your peripheral neuropathy.

This is where having a written neuropathy treatment plan goes along way. In fact you could apply this to almost any illness.

Here’s what to do next:

First of all take out a large piece of paper, or even on mobile phone. Actually, in this stage I am a huge fan of mobile notes sync across all devices.

On your neuropathy treatment plan should first be all your known risk factors. This would include things like cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption, inactivity, and perhaps diabetes. Maybe there are other known factors, such as consumption of medications known to produce peripheral neuropathy.

Once you have your list, then you need to divide it into things that you can change. The very next thing you need to do is to prioritize your neuropathy treatment plan. For example what is having the biggest impact on your health?

This is the very first thing, although perhaps the most difficult that you need to do first.

By first developing a neuropathy treatment plan and then using your own willpower and discipline, along with the help from your family and healthcare professionals, you can do a whole lot to help yourself feel better and function better!

And this really is the entire premise of the Beating Neuropathy family. We are here to help and support you!

What we do know however is those who use written neuropathy treatment plans and not only work off them but share them with their neuropathy treatment specialists have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

To that end, we are here to support you!

Join our conversation today on Facebook by clicking HERE!

Vitamin A Neuropathy & Health

Vitamin A Is a Key Neuropathy and Health Nutrient

Vitamin AThis key nutrient is responsible in a large part for healthy skin and epithelial cells. Those little guys are the cells, which line our mouth, GI tract and even our lungs.

This is why you now see so many skin lotions and topical drugs with Vitamin A derivatives.

Vitamin A is also needed if or a normal healthy immune system. In fact, during times of infection, I’ll suggest patients take some very large amounts but just for a few days. There are however two serious CAUTIONS! If you are pregnant or of childbearing age you need to know excess Vitamin A is teratogenic, meaning it can cause birth defects. This is why we advise young women take natal only formulas for at least 6 months before conception. These formulas also contain extra Folic acid, which helps prevent birth defects.

The next caution is that excess Vitamin A can be TOXIC If you consume too much and possibly in liver disease. Vitamin A Is one of the fat soluble vitamins, so it hangs around in our bodies a good bit longer than things like most B vitamins. So please work with your own health professionals on dosages for you.

Deficiencies in this key nutrient are more likely in malabsorbtion syndromes and bowel diseases. If you are following the NeuropathDR Diet Plan you should be in good shape, as long as you are consuming lots of leafy green and brightly colored vegetables.

Unfortunately, it’s only beta-carotene not the other caratenoids which have significant pro-vitamin A value. So veggies like carrots are particularly good for this reason.
Retinol is the most active form and is found in meats. This largely depends upon how healthy the animals are we consume.

Because Vitamin A is so critical to immune function it has roles in prevention of infection and probably many cancers as well.

So know you know! Don’t ignore this Key Neuropathy Diet Plan nutrient!

Share Your Thoughts and Join the conversation on Facebook!

Vitamin b12

Vitamin B12 and Your Neuropathy

Vitamin B12 deficiency may cause or contribute to the development of peripheral neuropathy.

Vitamin b12

Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient, which when missing, contributes to, and may actually create a number of different diseases.

Not the least of which is causing or contributing to the development of peripheral neuropathy.

The reason for this is that vitamin B12 is absolutely essential for the normal function of every cell in the brain and nervous system.

Damage to the nervous system caused by vitamin B12 deficiency can actually be permanent and irreversible.

Like so many of the other nutrients we’ve spoken about already, vitamin B12 is also essential for energy production and cellular repair.

B12 is manufactured by bacteria and then ingested by animals. In animals, as well as humans, it undergoes conversion to one or more active forms.

In the autoimmune disease pernicious anemia, a lack of intrinsic factor needed for normal absorption of B12 in the small bowel leads the development of vitamin B12 deficiency—and, possibly, also the diseases that that can cause.

Deficiency of vitamin B12 is also one of the more common deficiencies we see in private practice. When we check with laboratory studies, many adults have inadequate levels.

Signs and symptoms of low vitamin B12 levels are very common and are often passed on as simple fatigue or aging. These symptoms include low energy, fatigue, depression, and memory changes. B12 deficiency in the outpatient setting is probably second only to vitamin D.

Low B12 levels can be due to a combination of diet and a number of different factors. Normal aging is one of these factors; B12 deficiency is much more common in adults over 50.

Some other factors include chronic use of medications that affect the lining of the GI tract, bowel diseases, and actually many prescription medications.

One of the most common reasons for vitamin B12 deficiency in diabetics is the prescription drug metformin.

Like all the key nutrients, it is most important to clearly identify, then attempt to correct a vitamin B12 deficiency.

Eliminating correctable underlying causes such as poor dietary habits and unnecessary drug use are two of the most common ones that I see in my practice—and are two of the easiest fixes.

High dosages of oral supplementation under supervision and/or injection of vitamin B12 may be necessary to correct low levels and frank deficiencies.

Since the effects of vitamin B12 deficiency can be permanent, is very important that you and your doctors take this nutrient and its deficiency very seriously.

This is especially true if you suffer from neuropathy or any neurologic disorder.

So don’t be afraid to ask questions.

I still recommend all adults should routinely have vitamin B12, vitamin D, and folic acid levels checked at every annual physical examination and more often once supplementation has begun.|

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Allithiamine Tablets

More Vitamin B1 and #Neuropathy Treatment

Vitamin B1 has beneficial effects on neuropathy.

Allithiamine Tablets

 

If you follow our series of nutrition articles and yes our regular articles, you know that we frequently talk about the importance of vitamin B-1. But you may not know that thiamine or vitamin B1 occurs in several different forms.

Vitamin B1 is hugely important. It helps our bodies indeed, it helps every cell to produce energy more efficiently. It also can have a very significant effect on lowering blood sugar, stimulating mental alertness, and having a calming effect on the nervous system. In fact thiamine is the key nutrient given to alcoholics who are withdrawing.

The most common form in dietary supplements is thiamine hydrochloride. And for most patients this is the most common form that is consumed. It is relatively inexpensive and tolerated well by most patients. One of the disadvantages however is that it can cause stomach upset.

There are different forms of vitamin B1 that have been available for some time. One in particular is in the synthetic form called benfotiamine and has been used in Europe and Japan for over 30 years for the treatment of nerve pain and related conditions.

There is however even a slightly different form that is naturally present in sulfur containing plants. Its chemical analog is now synthesized. One of these is called Allithiamine with an A. This unique substance is at least in part of what is responsible for the natural odor of garlic and onions.

Now it is not a perfect substance. It has a characteristic odor, which some people find highly objectionable. *We do not know enough about its long-term usage and extreme caution is advised in giving it to any patient who has a history of cancer or a metastatic disease.

But what we do know is this; conditions including neuropathy that benefit from the beneficial effects of vitamin B1 oftentimes respond very well to Allithiamine, both in tablet and cream form.

What most people undergoing effective neuropathy treatment have discovered is that when they begin to use it, they won’t use anything else!

Join the conversation today on Facebook!

healing chronic disease with the power of positive attitude

Vitamin C is a Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Vitamin C is important to neuropathy patients as is it does help our bodies rid themselves of toxic substances.

Vitamin C is another key player in health and nutrition. In fact, just like Vitamin A which we discussed a few days ago vitamin C is absolutely essential to cell health, replication, and repair.

Perhaps you are already familiar with some of the key functions of vitamin C. You probably know you can shorten recovery times from infections like the flu and colds.

Like vitamin A, vitamin C has a significant role in bolstering our bodies immune system.

But more than this Vitamin C takes part in many key biochemical reactions throughout the entire body. If we consume less vitamin C than we need on a daily basis, our blood vessels can become fragile and our body will begin to break down very quickly.

This was the lessons learned at sea many years ago when sailors developed survey, the Vitamin C deficiency disease.

Vitamin C is absolutely essential for collagen and tissue repair-collagen, is the substance that binds together our skin, and ligaments, muscles, joints etc. This is one of the key reasons that vitamin C applied to the skin can help improve its tone, texture, and resistance to environmental factors.

Just like all nutrients however too much of a good thing is not necessarily better. The maximum amount of vitamin C that should be taken on a daily basis is probably around 2000 mg. and this amount should probably only be continued for a relatively short periods of time. There are of course exceptions, and each patient is different.

This is why you should work with your clinician when formulating your precise nutrition plan.

If you’re following the NeuropathyDR Diet and Lifestyle Plan, it is unlikely that you’ll be deficient vitamin C. The simple reason for this is that you’ll be consuming a fair amount of fresh vegetables and small to moderate amounts of fruits. Many of these are naturally high in vitamin C. The better quality food, the higher the vitamin content.

This is why you must learn to shop wisely and store your food carefully.

Perhaps one of the key reasons that vitamin C is important to neuropathy patients is it does help our bodies rid themselves of toxic substances. These could be anything from natural breakdown products in the body to substances we encounter in our environments.

The net result however is adequate amounts of vitamin C ensure that these critical functions happen, and will help to keep you not only feeling, healing well but also looking your very best!

Join the conversation today on Facebook!

Got Neuropathy? You May Need To Consider Weight Loss!

Many patients with peripheral neuropathy discover is that weight loss can accelerate healing, reduce pain, and dramatically improve quality of life.

Healthy eating woman

 

Amazingly, one of the things that most patients who suffer from peripheral neuropathy discover is that weight loss can accelerate their healing, reduce their pain, and dramatically improve the quality of their life.

Now, this is true for many forms of peripheral neuropathy, especially those associated with diabetes or metabolic syndrome.

The reasons for this are many.

But here are three reasons why you should consider weight loss if you suffer from neuropathy, or ANY form of chronic pain.

Number one: Being even as little as 10 to 15 pounds overweight can help create an inflammatory environment in your body. Inflammation causes pain, which sets the stage for more devastating diseases.

In fact, I have had patients present to my practice with significant widespread aches and pains, whose only medical issue was being overweight. Their inflammatory blood markers (CRP), much like those who suffer from inflammatory arthritis and other devastating diseases, are often significantly elevated.

An inflammatory environment in our bodies helps create symptoms including achiness, fatigue, and other bothersome issues—which many patients simply accept as normal.

Being even a little overweight will also aggravate any underlying pain syndromes, like peripheral neuropathy. Simply by losing weight, you can correct much of this pro-inflammatory situation!

Second, you probably already understand that being overweight makes it much more difficult for you to maintain normal blood and blood sugar levels. Elevations in both of these, especially triglycerides and blood sugars over many years, can lead to the development of, or worsening of, peripheral neuropathy.

The third, and perhaps most powerful, reason to consider weight loss is, by losing weight, we significantly reduce our risks of devastating diseases including diabetes, heart disease, and many forms of cancer.

As we recently published, the NeuropathyDR diet solution is one that is very effective.

In fact, we’ve had patients tell us they lose as much as 5 to 8 pounds in just several days after beginning and following our diet. In case you missed it, you’ll find that at http://neuropathydr.com/the-neuropathydr-diet.

One of the last, and most compelling, reasons to consider weight loss is, like most patients, you’ll likely experience more energy, less fatigue, drop your blood pressure, and perhaps even improve other conditions without more drugs, including health issues such as fibromyalgia and sleep apnea.

Remember we are ready to help, when you are!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

“It’s Just a Slight Tingling, Maybe It Will Go Away…”

Nowhere else can this attitude be as dangerous as in your health—especially when dealing with peripheral neuropathy and related disorders.

Woman looking depressed

Now, those of you who read us regularly know that sudden onset of tingling, or other “funny” symptoms could be a medical emergency, like a stroke. That’s why an accurate diagnosis is your FIRST imperative!

What I’m talking about here is the cases where we see patients who “blow off” their own self-care, including available good neuropathy treatment!

Sometimes it’s finances, lack of family—or, even physician—support, but all too often it’s not wanting to make the emotional or time investment in learning all about YOUR type of neuropathy, then focusing like a laser on the things you CAN do!

First, you really have to know what you are dealing with. We do know that better health habits, regardless of your diagnosis, make an incredible difference. That’s why an accurate diagnosis is imperative!

For example, almost universally, we know that diabetic and MANY OTHER neuropathy patients who avoid dairy, gluten, and get strict with what and how they eat, get the best neuropathy treatment results! And this is even MORE true in the case of metabolic syndrome, or pre-diabetes, which is now epidemic.

Another area we feel VERY strongly about is that most neuropathy patients should at least try a gentle electric neurostimulator! 

So much so, I have even invented a brand new one! But, more on that next month.

Yes, you can even lease or rent these from us! You’ll find everything at http://neuropathydr.com/homecare

Now, when this type of home care is coupled with great clinicians, manual therapies and rehab, laser therapy, and therapeutic nutrition, you are PUSHING your body in the direction of healing, wherever that is possible!

So, why NOT do everything you can do to help beat your neuropathy early? The longer you wait, or if you just dampen the symptoms with medication, the more difficult feeling better will be!

Our clinics are always ready to help you with great in office treatment plans and home care kits AND many specialized, viable treatments!

A complimentary 15-minute Neuropathy Analysis, lease or rental of related equipment, and even no-interest financing are available in most NeuropathyDR® Treatment centers for any non-covered services, supplies, and equipment!

We are more than happy to discuss YOUR neuropathy treatment needs with your personal physicians, too!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

#Neuropathy And The Blood Sugar Connection Part II

#Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are two diseases that are becoming much more common.

Food

Although there are genetic contributions, most of the time metabolic syndrome and diabetes develop because of a declining level of physical fitness and carrying around too much body fat.

Our so-called modern high-fat and high sugar diets are a big contribution. Most adults need only 2000 calories or so per day yet some people consume as much as 6000 calories or more per day for years on end.

Diabetes and it’s precursor called the metabolic syndrome, are two diseases that are becoming much more common as the result of consuming too many calories and lack of physical activity and exercise.

One of the most devastating things that tens to happen as a direct result of metabolic syndrome and in a large number of patients who suffer from diabetes is peripheral neuropathy.

Most often this does not happen overnight. It takes many years for these to develop and by that time, considerable damage often has been done. This is why it is so important to control your calorie intake and maintain the highest level of physical activity. You can at any age!

Once the damage from elevated blood sugar is done, simply getting sugars under control is not enough! This is a myth that both physicians and patients alike don’t fully understand. There are good studies that show 75% of time just getting sugars control is not enough – you could be left with significant pain and disability just by treating the elevated blood sugar!

This is where a comprehensive NeuropathyDR Treatment plan may help you substantially!

So isn’t it time you learn all you can about #neuropathy treatment in advance?

Remember, we are here to help.

We will do everything in our power to help nurse you back to health, but YOU must reach out and grab all these tools!

Otherwise you run the risk of suffering miserably for the rest of your life.

Harsh words? Yes.

But it is the truth.

post your comments and questions on Facebook!