Neuropathy Pain Is A Complex Phenomenon

Peripheral neuropathy pain and many forms of chronic pain are now easier than ever to manage at home and in the clinic.

Practical day-to-day solutions can be difficult for neuropathy and chronic pain patients to deal with.

This is largely because every single medication has potential side effects. Sometimes they’re not obvious for many years. With many over-the-counter medications such as acetaminophen and NSAIDs, the side effects may not be apparent until liver or kidney failure appears.

This is not an exaggeration. If you follow us on social media, you know how often we talk about this; right now it is the number one cause of liver and kidney failure in this country. This is a huge public health epidemic.

Unfortunately, medical education generally does not do a good job of educating physicians on drug-free alternatives to pain management. For generations now, even children have been fed medications at an early age and taught this is the only solution.

There are even links to early dosages of acetaminophen and the development of asthma, and perhaps other health issues as well.

Let’s talk about the most practical solutions. First and foremost, rather than reaching for medications first, use all the drug-free alternatives you have at your disposal. Simple measures early on are far better. Applications of ice packs, warm packs, and Epsom salt baths still go a long way to solving many of life’s aches and pains.

Maintaining proper body weight and make sure you are eating an anti-inflammatory diet.

But neuropathy pain is a different animal. Severe pain—debilitating pain—from any source requires extraordinary measures. Still, the simple things we spoke about earlier can have a powerful impact.

This is especially true when simple measures are combined with appropriate dietary changes.

The good news is, peripheral neuropathy and many forms of chronic pain are now easier than ever to manage at home and in the clinic.

With the introduction of our new NDGen®, and ever improving in clinic protocols, more patients are finding better and longer lasting results than ever before.

Always remember though, the key to best managing neuropathy, arthritis, fibromyalgia, spinal pain, etc… is stopping pain at its source wherever possible—and rapidly! This means improving the overall function of your entire body early on, not simply masking pain with medication, and, most importantly, boosting and improving the efficiency and energy of your key body systems.

That’s what we help you do!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Copper: Another Key Neuropathy Nutrient

Most people don’t think about copper as a key nutrient. Or in any way related to peripheral neuropathy or chronic pain. But as you’ll see, a small daily amount is necessary and essential to normal health and well-being.

Only the tiniest amounts are necessary for normal health. But like so many nutrients, lack this tiny amount, and we cannot survive.

In the human body, copper serves several roles. Perhaps the most important are our body’s ability to process oxygen, and absorb iron. Both of these functions are of course essential to life.

We only need approximately 3 mg or so per day to remain healthy. Unfortunately, excess copper more than our bodies can normally dispose of can cause a whole host of health problems, and must be avoided.

The most common source of excess copper in humans is likely from copper plumbing.

Copper levels can be measured in the blood and in the hair.

As we discussed recently, excess zinc supplementation will deplete copper, creating a mineral imbalance and the health problems that go with it. So, excess zinc supplementation will cause a copper deficiency.

This can lead to a host of health problems. There is a syndrome called myeloneuropathy in which copper deficiency causes a B12 deficiency like illness, with damage to the nerves and spinal cord.

Likewise, copper deficiency due to excess zinc, either due to supplements or poisonings like denture cream, can lead to the development of neuropathy too.

One of the key functions of copper is maintenance of normal joint and soft tissue proteins. There is no scientific evidence that copper bracelets and copper socks and the like work for arthritis, even though this was once suggested as a possible cure.

Our NeuropathyDR diet is adequate for normal intake of copper because it is high in nuts and seeds. Additional good sources include olives and avocados. Paleo sources include shellfish, beef, and lamb.

Because copper is essential for normal cellular energy and respiration, a deficiency could aggravate many underlying conditions yes including chronic pain and neuropathy.

Now you know more about this pretty metal!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

A Simpler Chronic Pain and Neuropathy Treatment Strategy

Suffering from peripheral neuropathy or any other form of chronic pain can be difficult to manage on a day-to-day basis. But a simpler treatment strategy can often help alleviate much suffering for these individuals.

If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy or really any other form of chronic pain than you understand how difficult it can be manage this on a day-to-day basis.

One of the reasons for this is that by its definition chronic pain is insidious, meaning it tends to creep up slowly.

So like most patients for quite a long period of time you may have already tried a dozen or more medications.

But yet this entire time no one has helped you focus on the simpler things that can have enormous and often extraordinary benefits to your overall health, no matter what stage you’re at.

Specifically we’re talking about diet, meditation, mindfulness, stress reduction, and as much physical activity in which your condition will allow.

For those patients who have been seriously ill or recovering from surgery, this simply may be getting up and about out of bed more often with assistance, and at-home physical therapy.

In this category I would also add the appropriate use of non-drug treatment modalities, physical therapy modalities, massage, using your NDGen kit, and laser therapy.

Some of these are available in the clinic as well as at home.

What DOES not work is continually plying your body with more painkilling medications without paying attention to everything else.

Of course this is not to say that medications are not helpful. Often times these are extremely beneficial in helping to manage the pain and discomfort associated with neuropathy when it can be at its very worst.

But for too many, simply relying on these along while ignoring the simplest but critical things is doing you a tremendous disservice.

Many patients find that learning more about how these different tools, like the NDGen unit, and then redesigning a simpler life, along with reducing medications and their associated side effects, are more appropriate self-care strategies that go a long way towards helping them improve the quality of their life.

That’s why our clinicians are here! We stand by ready to help when you are.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Hydration is Crucial to Feeling Our Best

Maintaining adequate hydration can help you suffer less chronic pain and yes less neuropathy pain too!

Almost invariably when we see a new chronic pain patients in our practice, we discuss health habits and we find that more often than not, failure to drink adequate amount of water is almost universal.

So why is that?

Why would not drinking enough water tend to cause more widespread pains? There are several reasons and the answers are not complicated.

You see the vast majority of our body is made of water. Blood and all the critical fluids keep us functioning like well-oiled machines.

Our kidneys, brain, and all our other vital organs use these fluids to communicate and also perform daily purifications.

Yet most of us don’t pay nearly enough attention to this key fact.

So rather than going through our days drinking fluids, most especially water that will keep our blood and fluid volumes high, we tend to over consume caffeine, or worse yet soft drinks, and perhaps even alcohol which depletes our water reserves even further.

If we don’t drink enough water we can suffer an impaired ability of our vital organs like kidneys and liver that help rid our bodies of toxic wastes. These toxic wastes can make us stiff sore and uncomfortable.

If you already suffer from neuropathy or chronic pain, becoming even slightly dehydrated will make you feel a whole lot worse.

So how much water do you need to drink?

In the absence of kidney or heart disease, the proverbial eight glasses a day is about right.

A more accurate consumption is approximately half your body weight in ounces in a 24-hour period. This is not 100 percent accurate but it’s a darn good approximation.

There are of course other factors which may require more or less water consumption.

This of course includes how much you perspire, the outside air temperature, and yes even the humidity.

So for example, if you weigh 200 pounds, you’d be consuming approximately 100 ounces of water during the course of the daily 24-hour period. That may sound like a lot, but it’s under a gallon in 24 hours.

As always you need to work with your doctors on your own personal medical issues that you may have questions or concerns about.

You may want to ask for the simple blood tests which measure your electrolytes and relative hydration.

Working together maintaining adequate hydration can help you suffer less chronic pain and yes less neuropathy pain too!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Help Your Body Detoxify Naturally

One of the things that is very popular after the first of the year in many people are weight loss and exercise programs. Today we’re going to discuss some regimens that will help you detoxify naturally from some of the less-than-healthy choices you may have may in the previous year.

Unfortunately, New Year’s resolutions and intentions are made shortly after the holidays, and usually fizzle out by the middle of February.

This is just reality, it is human behavior. But there is part of this strategy you need to know that can be dangerous, especially if you have neuropathy, fibromyalgia, or chronic pain.

In particular, don’t put yourself at risk by consuming dietary shakes, or pills of the compounds which contain multiple combinations of herbs.

The reality is the interaction of all these together on your body is not well known at all.

In fact, some are downright toxic.

I actually have seen a 20-something year old patient develop peripheral neuropathy after consuming a “diet shake” just for a week.

Impossible? No. In fact, more and more younger patients are showing up in emergency rooms after consuming energy and diet drinks. More than ever.

This is also one of the reasons that you will not find any herbal preparation in either the supplements or topical preparations we suggest and use in our clinic’s every day.

For most patients, following our NeuropathyDR diet, carbohydrate control, physical activity, and exercise wherever possible can make an enormous difference in weight control and, yes, even weight loss after the holidays.

One other thing, be honest with yourself! If you have diligently tried the suggestions we talked about above, but still have difficulty with your weight, then it’s possible there’s some hormonal factors at work. These need to be identified and worked out with your physicians.

Stay away from fasts, and other rapid weight-loss programs. Sometimes, these can really aggravate underlying neuropathy and chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia.

The reason is some of the the so-called “detox programs” may actually “pull” potential toxins in from your body faster, resulting in higher concentrations, and ultimately aggravating your condition.

Finally, it is a really good idea to warn our children of the dangers of some “diet and energy” drinks.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Zinc and Your Health

As you know, zinc is a metal. It is used in a process applied to preserve metals from corrosion, especially in salt water. This of course is called galvanization. But what you may not know is that zinc also plays a large role in your health, especially neurologic and immune system-related issues.

Zinc and Your Health

Like so many nutrients, balance is everything. Too much zinc will suppress the immune system and cause difficulties with copper levels. Too little zinc can create problems ranging from memory impairment to prostate disease.

Yes, neurologic dysfunction can result when zinc is deficient. According to Hambridge et al in 2007 in “Zinc deficiency a special challenge”, it is stated that zinc is an element with “profound biologic significance”. In fact, zinc deficiencies worldwide are responsible for many disease states.

Perhaps the most important thing to understand is that zinc imbalances are relatively common. This is due both to low levels in foods of modern agriculture as well as elevated levels of copper due to plumbing and environmental sources.

In the clinic, we will measure hair and blood levels of these crucial elements when assessing nutrition status.

In our bodies, zinc can actually act as an antioxidant. This protects us against damage from environmental assaults, as well as natural aging. The presence of zinc is essential for normal nerve function.

It is well-known that zinc can speed the healing process and, in essential amounts, will help stimulate the immune system and possibly prevent prostate disease.

When zinc is used in shampoos and skin lotions, it can act as a sunscreen, a soothing dressing, and also help prevent dandruff.

The reason that zinc is so important is that it participates in many chemical reactions, especially in enzymes.

The recommended dietary allowance for zinc is around 15 mg per day. However modern diets alone sometimes fall short of this.

The good news is, the neuropathy diet that we recommend is high in nuts and seeds which provide relatively good zinc levels. Seafood, shellfish in particular, can be great sources of dietary zinc.

For most patients, safe zinc supplementation level is probably not more than 25 mg per day. More than 50 mg a day could be detrimental. Like so many nutrients, this is one area where working with your neuropathy healthcare professionals is essential if there are any questions at all about appropriate zinc dosages.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy Myths Busted!

Having neuropathy and chronic pain requires incredible attention to your lifestyle. It’s important to separate the facts from the myths!

One of the things that frustrates patients and doctors alike in our clinic is the idea that once neuropathy or chronic pain has set in, all the patient needs to do is take this pill or that.

This treatment or that, this miracle supplement, or creme, or that…

Nothing—and I mean nothing—could be further from the truth.

Worse yet is thinking that just because chemotherapy has stopped, or diabetes is better controlled, that neuropathy, along with the burning pain, numbness, and sleepless nights will somehow miraculously disappear.

Of course, sometimes this does happen. But that is actually relatively rare.

The reality is, whatever has caused your neuropathy, recovery is often complex and requires multiple steps and components!

The reason for this is that once nerve damage has set in, some might be permanent—or reversible, but very slowly.

This means your body needs a healing push in the right direction.

This “push” includes all the good things you can do for yourself, including specific home-care tools, like neurostim.

This is also where complementing your nutrition support, including very complete and unfragmented oral and topical programs, can go a long way.

These actually target cell energy, efficiency, and recovery potential—not simply masking neuropathy symptoms.

You see, the more you can do to stimulate a healing response in particular, the better your results will be. And the better your chances of having a more complete recovery.

Delay, or simply mask your symptoms and you will not be as fortunate.

This also requires incredible attention to your lifestyle, in detail. Is this difficult? You bet! But think of it this way: What are the alternatives to really having a lasting and best result?

Just as if you had major surgery, even something such as a heart transplant, you need to give your body every chance you can!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Are All the Peripheral Neuropathies the Same?

No, all the peripheral neuropathies are not the same. However, we find that the patients who present with peripheral neuropathy, regardless of the cause, do have remarkably similar symptoms.

The good news with our treatment program has been that even in the presence of similar symptoms from different etiologies (causes), the corrective care for peripheral neuropathies is often remarkably effective, regardless of the primary cause. That is the beauty of the treatment system that we employ.

In order to find out what components of peripheral neuropathy you have, your doctor will conduct a very thorough evaluation. This will include things such as taking your vital signs, body mass index, the mobility and range of motion of your lower back and hips, and the overall health of your feet, skin, nails and hair, blood vessels, and circulation. This might include Doppler ultrasound, which is a simple painless test to check for blood flow or blockages.

As the doctor performs her clinical examination, she’ll also perform a very thorough neurological examination including reflexes, muscle-testing, and sensation to touch using a device as simple as a pin, a brush, or perhaps even a pinwheel. Doctors commonly will also check your vibration sensation, which very often is disturbed in peripheral neuropathy. This is done painlessly and very easily through the use of simple tuning forks. Your balance will also be assessed.

Laboratory tests may very well be performed. These would include things such as a chemistry panel, and kidney and liver function. Your doctor will also want to double check your blood sugar levels and more than likely perform a hemoglobin A1c.

This particular test is very good at identifying patients who may be borderline diabetic. I have found many patients who present with neuropathy symptoms have yet to be diagnosed with diabetes, but may very well suffer from what’s called metabolic syndrome. This is when your body abnormally handles blood sugar, which may unfortunately lead to the development of neuropathy and other diabetic complications well before the formal diagnosis is made.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Eating More Often Can Manage Neuropathy and Weight

Eating more frequently will stimulate your metabolism—or, how efficiently you burn versus store fat, keep your blood sugar even, and help keep you warmer. Eating more frequently can also help patients who are dealing with neuropathy and weight issues that can arise from their medical condition(s).

On the surface, a statement like that might seem wrong. After all, isn’t eating at the root of weight gain, obesity, and its complications? To a point, yes. This is especially true when we consume far more calories in one sitting then we need, and load our meals with carbohydrates and poor-quality fats.

But a little-known fact is that when we eat less frequently, we become much more efficient at storing fat rather than burning it.

So what does this have to do with managing peripheral neuropathy?

Neuropathy and Weight

The bottom line is, eating more frequently will stimulate your metabolism—or, how efficiently you burn fat versus store fat, keep your blood sugar more even, and actually help keep you warmer. For patients who suffer from peripheral neuropathy, all of these improvements are crucial.

But this does not mean you can eat anything you want. What we do know is that by consuming relatively low amounts of carbohydrates in our meals, along with periodic snacks, we become much more efficient metabolically.

What I tell all my neuropathy patients—and, indeed, every patient—is to try to eat something not more than three hours apart. For example, you will start your breakfast with something like a protein shake, or a small serving of steel-cut oatmeal with a little added fat, perhaps some berries. Approximately two hours later, you’ll have six to 10 almonds, or perhaps another lean, low-carbohydrate snack if allergies are a problem.

Now, if you are insulin-dependent diabetic, some of what I say here will not apply, so please be careful here.

Again, this points out the need to work with well-trained neuropathy treatment professionals to truly manage your peripheral neuropathy and weight issues, indeed, your health in general.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Do You Suffer From Neuropathy Overwhelm?

Don’t let Neuropathy Overwhelm get the best of you. For many with the most common forms of neuropathy there are more treatment options than ever before!

One of the common things about neuropathy in most forms, except CMT, HNPP and other genetic cases is, most patients don’t even know what it is until they have it.

So a neuropathy diagnosis can come as a shock!

Up until recently, the approach to treatment has been drug-only. For years, patients heard the following, and unfortunately still often do:

“There is NOTHING you can do.” or “Just take the meds and live with it.”

Or worse.

Now, sometimes this is unfortunately true, and we are not offering false hope to those devastated patients we so wish we could do more for.

But, the reality for many with the most common forms of neuropathy (idiopathic neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy, post chemotherapy neuropathy, small fiber neuropathy) is there are more treatment options than ever before.

Sometimes these can actually replace drug-only treatment options for patients. That’s really exciting for all of us!

We raised the awareness of single-frequency neurostimulation treatment when we first published Beating Neuropathy: Taking Misery to Miracles in Just Five Weeks!

Then, in just two short years of continuous work and development of treatment systems, we found better and better ways to help patients.

Things like laser and LED, vibration therapy, certain dietary supplement combinations… There are also certain other neuropathy treatment combinations, and even more powerful devices available now, thanks to some very bright and caring people.

Just as I predicted, patients now have more neuropathy treatment options than ever—and it can be overwhelming.

But there is a strategy you can use that will help!

First, understand you may never know 100% what caused your neuropathy. Sure, sometimes it’s very straightforward, but in most patients, it’s actually a combination of many things. Diet, lifestyle, obesity, and smoking are at the top of the list.

Secondly, delaying fixing correctable things like smoking, obesity (even as little as 10-20 pounds) poor, highly processed foods and sugar-laden diets, and excess alcohol consumption commonly make things worse.

So, start by making a list, two columns only. Call the first “things I could improve”. This is the time to be really honest with yourself. List out all we spoke about above, mainly lifestyle choices and habits.

In the second column, put “what I need to investigate”. Include “drugs I may be taking” and “tests I need to ask about”.

Lastly, we firmly believe that patients suffering from neuropathy and chronic pain deserve and should get very comprehensive approaches to care.

And DON’T delay treatment while searching for answers you may never find about causes. The good news is, many patients are good responders to our neuropathy treatment combinations!

But, as I’m sure you can see, good neuropathy treatment has now become a specialty all of its own! So choose your professional care very carefully.

Just be sure to do your homework first to avoid neuropathy treatment overwhelm!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Eating Smart to Improve Neuropathy and Chronic Pain

Eating smart, such as getting used to smaller meals, and adding low-carbohydrate snacks, can help neuropathy and chronic pain patients feel much better.

One of the things that most patients with neuropathy—and many patients with chronic pain—discover, is that keeping well-fueled and well-hydrated goes a long way towards possibly reducing symptoms and improving the quality of life!

Now, the reasons for this are many, but the bottom line is: paying better attention to basic body needs dramatically improves the function of our brain and nervous system.

There are a couple of basic rules that serve most neuropathy and chronic pain patients very well.

First, let’s talk a little about water consumption. An easy rule of thumb is to consume one half your body weight in ounces during a 24-hour period.

So, if we weigh a hundred and eighty pounds, we should drink ninety ounces of water (or non-alcohol liquids) in a 24-hour period.

Remember, coffee, tea, and alcohol can cause us to lose fluid more rapidly, so go easy here. Under no circumstances should diet or other soft drinks be consumed.

Next, the mainstay or proper fueling is eating every 2 to 3 hours’ maximum. Getting used to smaller meals, and adding low-carbohydrate snacks such as several nuts or one half of an apple or other low-carb fruit, can help us feel much better.

The reason for this is it helps us maintain normal blood sugar levels and helps us burn fat more efficiently.

What a lot of people don’t understand is eating infrequently makes us much more efficient at producing body fat.

So, conversely, eating more frequently makes us feel better—and helps fuel us much more efficiently.

This is also what helps us fight things like diabetes and metabolic syndrome—that, as you already know, complicate many health problems, and make neuropathy and pain worse.

Like everything, there are exceptions to these rules. For example, if you’re insulin-dependent, you need to match your insulin dosage against your carbohydrate consumption very carefully.

Likewise, if you suffer from kidney or heart disease, you may need to be more careful with fluid consumption. Always follow your doctor’s orders.

Try these simple suggestions starting today, and see how much better you may feel within just a few days!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Don’t Fall for Quick Fixes and Miracle Cures

The one most important thing you can do as a neuropathy patient or family member is to do your homework, very carefully! Don’t Fall for Quick Fixes and Miracle Cures.

You know what I’m talking about

You have seen these ads for miracle cures as often as I have. ”Take this one miraculous supplement and your neuropathy will disappear.” Sometimes it’s just, “put this into your shoes and watch the miracles begin.”

Unfortunately, as you well know, neuropathy and most forms of chronic pain (like fibromyalgia and arthritis) need a multi-pronged approach in order for patients to improve—or, whenever possible, recover!

You also understand that quality-of-life is the most important objective for any neuropathy or chronic pain patient.

Now, I’d be the last to want to discount the value of good marketing… just as long as the solutions are ethical and viable.

But I will repeatedly tell you that the one most important thing you can do as a neuropathy patient or family member is to do your homework, very carefully!

This is exactly why at our centers we advocate a multi-pronged approach to treatment. There is no one magic nutrient, therapy, or technique that by itself is going to restore your health immediately.

This is a fact. What is most important, however, is that you keep yourself on track, making incremental—but definite—progress, on a daily basis!

You know I write about this extensively: things such as maintaining a carbohydrate controlled, dairy and gluten-free diet, getting as much physical activity as your condition allows, and really taking the time to understand the impact that a high-sugar and carbohydrate diet has on your health—and how destructive this can be. Understand that sitting for as little as 90 minutes at a time can slow your metabolism dramatically.

All of these things we have written or spoken about on our radio shows and articles during the last 90 days.

Above all, it is critical to be working with healthcare professionals, who are on your side and encourage you to improve your health—not just calm your neuropathy symptoms with medication.

This is what we do all day long—train chronic pain health care professionals to be their very best for you!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy, Vitamin B1, and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Did you know that Thiamine, or Vitamin B1, can actually improve blood sugar levels—and thus, diabetes?

Not too long ago, we spoke about a very important vitamin, and its role in neuropathy and chronic pain. This vitamin was B1, or Thiamine. As you may remember, B1 is part of the family of water-soluble vitamins, and our body storage is limited. Therefore, it is relatively easy to become deficient or suffer from low levels relatively quickly.

Perhaps the most significant cause of low thiamine in our society is the high carbohydrate diets that so many people consume. You see, thiamine is necessary for our bodies to produce energy. When we lack thiamine, a whole host of health problems can develop.

What many patients and their doctors may be ignorant of is the fact that thiamine (vitamin B1) can actually improve blood sugar levels—and, thus, diabetes.

In fact, in borderline diabetes, vitamin B1 may actually help drop blood sugars, and what is called glucose tolerance, or how our bodies handle sugar, to normal within a month.

I have even seen insulin-dependent diabetics drop their blood sugars over 200 points, one virtually overnight with as little as 25 mg of thiamine.

Like many nutrients, this is one place you really need to work with your clinicians. You and your doctors need to know that taking additional vitamin B1 can reduce need for medications, and sometimes even insulin.

This becomes even truer as you improve the overall quality of your diet. You and your doctors also should be aware that all not all vitamin B1 is created the same.

In particular we are very partial to Allithiamine. It is tolerated better than most other forms and is taken up by the body more efficiently than the common thiamine hydrochloride.

And this is precisely why that we recommend all diabetic patients get in the habit of checking their blood sugars on a regular basis.

This is also why sticking to a carbohydrate-controlled diet is essential.

The most important things to avoid are processed breads and grains, as well as sugars, soft drinks, candy, and virtually all sweets. You also need to be very careful with sugary or dried fruits. If you missed it, go back and review our last post about the NeuropathyDr Diet. We highly recommend this diet to our patients.

Some excellent sources of thiamine in the diet include tuna, sunflower seeds, pistachios, and other nuts, as well as many beans.

Be sure to add more of these to your diet on a daily basis and work closely with your healthcare professionals on optimum supplementation to help improve your diabetes!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

The NeuropathyDR Diet and Chronic Pain Reduction Guide

How to keep what you’re eating from eating you? The key is beginning and staying with this neuropathy diet program! One of the questions we frequently get, as neuropathy and pain patients begin to understand the impact their diet has on overall health, is, “What do I eat, and when?” So, what I’m doing today is to describe a typical day of meals and snacks for a patient who is following the NeuropathyDR Diet, which is relatively easy to modify and add variety to on a regular basis.

Let’s start with Breakfast

It is very important to consume some protein within one half hour of arising. The reason for this is that it helps stimulate metabolism, protein synthesis, and mental alertness. It also helps us burn fuel more efficiently. My favorite breakfast is a vegetable protein shake, using a dairy-free protein powder with almond or coconut milk. Another good breakfast is a serving of gluten-free granola, taking care to keep carbohydrates between 15 and 20g maximum. You could also use a measured serving of gluten-free steel-cut oatmeal.

No more than three hours later, have a snack again, not exceeding 15g of carbs. This could include one half apple or banana, seven or eight almonds for other nuts, etc… Packaged protein or nut bars can be fine if the carb content is low.

Lunch should universally be some form of salad with protein

You can mix this up with your favorite greens. You could use baby spinach or mixes greens. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil, a few almonds or walnuts, and lean protein such as tuna, salmon, chicken, or turkey. If you are vegan or vegetarian, you could use tofu or tempeh.

No more than three hours later, have an additional snack, just like your mid-morning.

When dinnertime comes, this is the time to emphasize non-starchy vegetables

Some of the best are cooked spinach, broiled or sautéed asparagus, cabbage, beets, squashes, yams, and sweet potatoes, and so on. Keep starches, such as rice and white potatoes, to a minimum.

Be sure to get in a high-quality source of protein. Don’t be afraid to try things like hormone-free pork, beef, or, if available, fresh fish. Again, you could use a vegan alternative, just be careful of gluten and carb content.

Not more than three hours after dinner, have another snack.

This time, try a few gluten-free crackers with some almond butter. You can also try some sliced tofu. There are also low carbohydrate gluten-free cookies—just be careful not to eat the entire bag, which is easy to do! Another really good choice to satisfy your evening cravings is a small square of unsweetened dark chocolate.

So, what’s NOT here?

Well there is no dairy, cheese, or yogurt. There is no bread; there are no snack foods, soda, or chips. There are no ice creams or pies for dessert. There are no fruit juices, candy, or other sweets.

Do you see where we are going here? The fact of the matter is the above list of foods is probably responsible for more ill health and disease than any other single factor in the modern developed world.

The key is beginning and staying with the program. Don’t worry about the very rare weekend, or party. Just always stay trying not to go berserk. Be especially careful during holiday periods.

Consume half your body weight in ounces of clear liquids, most especially water, during plenty any 24-hour period.

Be especially careful not to overdo coffee and tea. Limit alcohol consumption to occasional low sugar wine or beer, and very rarely stronger adult beverages.

Once you make a shift, you will realize how simple, easy, and inexpensive this approach to eating–for neuropathy patients and anyone else–can be!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy and Chronic Pain Morning Game Plan

If you or someone you love suffers the misery of chronic pain or neuropathy, you know how these can seemingly run your life. A winning morning game plan for many neuropathy and chronic pain patients is a must.

When conditions like shingles, peripheral neuropathy and back pain linger, a real strategy is needed to best get back control of your life.

Experience in the clinic for over 30 years tells me repeatedly that those patents with routines do far better, suffer less pain and life disruption, including depression.

Game Plan

So what does this Daily game plan look like? Something like this:

Get up at a set time every day. Be sure to stay well dressed and completely warm and comfortable year round. Next, drink a warm beverage like coffee or tea. Use stevia instead of sugar or artificial sweeteners. Ideally, you’ll be sipping during quiet prayer or meditation, even if just for a little while. There’s nothing wrong with longer periods either!

Within 30 minutes of rising, eat a high protein meal. Could be a couple omega 3 eggs, or a protein shake. No bagels, toast or English muffins allowed this early!

Next, some light activity like a walk, gentle bike ride, and some stretching. It’s crucial that you stay well fed and warm to get the most pain reduction and healing benefits.

After a shower or bath, get yourself to therapy if it’s a treatment day.

If not, engage in some good self-treatment! Typically my patents use a home care kit of some type. Along with medications, this may include dietary supplements, heat packs, topical and often an electric neurostimulator. This could take up to an hour.

And then, get on to your day! Remember, a gluten and dairy free diet high in vegetables and lean protein works best for most neuropathy and pain patients. Low carbohydrate, high quality snacks like nuts and small amounts of fruit should be consumed so your are never going more than 3 hours without refueling. Keep your life as simple and free of distraction as possible.

At the end of your day, repeat the all the great self care and stick to the diet plan above!

This has proven to be a winning morning routine for many neuropathy and chronic pain patients, and I hope for you too!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

What Is Restless Leg Syndrome?

Restless Leg Syndrome can occur alongside peripheral neuropathy, or in patients who suffer from spinal stenosis. Patients with degenerative disc disease may also have RLS-like symptoms.

Very commonly, peripheral neuropathy is associated with profound sleep disturbance. In fact, sometimes this is what alerts the patient and the physicians that something is seriously wrong.

Perhaps, you may have heard of RLS, or Restless Leg Syndrome. RLS is a condition that is very common, and just like peripheral neuropathy, is often associated with other disorders.

Most commonly, patients will feel the sensation of crampiness, or an urgent need to move their legs about. This occurs during or at the hour of sleep.

We do know that RLS can occur alongside peripheral neuropathy. Another place where RLS like symptoms occur in the clinic, is in patients who suffer from a condition called spinal stenosis. Likewise, patients with degenerative disc disease may also have RLS-like symptoms.

We do know that just like neuropathy, patients that suffer from kidney disease, diabetes, may be predisposed towards developing RLS. Patients who consume caffeine, or take calcium-channel blockers may also suffer from RLS.

Just like in peripheral neuropathy, RLS is not always confined to the feet.

People can experience RLS-like symptoms in the upper thighs, or even the arms. Often, it is only movement, such as walking around, that stops the symptoms.

Although medication provides relief for some, it is important to pay attention to the factors that cause or worsen RLS and peripheral neuropathy.

And one of the biggest things that aggravate both of these conditions is emotional stress and upset.

Here’s the kicker, sleep disturbance is the major negative health impact of RLS. You may also be aware that sleep disturbance is one of the surest ways to aggravate almost any underlying health condition.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Neuropathy Symptoms and Cell Energy

For those who suffer from neuropathy, significant improvement in the quality of life can happen by making a few simple changes and adding special combinations of good neuropathy treatments that help to restore cell energy to healthier levels.

One of the things we get asked all the time is, “What makes your treatment program different?

This is a really good question. For anybody who suffers (or loves someone who does) from peripheral neuropathy or another form of chronic pain, it can be very frustrating to sort through all the details.

The good news is that the reasoning behind how we are able to provide neuropathy treatment is quite simple.

My background is in health care and nutrition. So, when I first began intensely treating neuropathy patients in 2008, I knew that improving their underlying health—especially how nerve cells process energy—had to help improve many patients’ peripheral neuropathy and other forms of nerve damage or chronic pain.

Of course, there are some patients we cannot cure. But we do find that even in patients with genetic neuropathies or other extremely difficult-to-treat cases, significant improvement in the quality of life can happen by making a few simple changes and adding special combinations of good neuropathy treatments.

Cell Energy and My Neuropathy Symptoms

The bottom line is, your nervous system is made up of billions of cells called neurons. Neurons are highly sensitive to their own environmental changes; things like long-term oxygen starvation due to cigarette smoking, or carrying around too much body weight for too long.

Our society is now developing diabetes at an alarming rate, in younger and younger age groups. This is largely due to poor food and lifestyle choices. We are also living longer, as a byproduct of better infection control, better chemotherapy drugs, and surgeries.

These things all bring with them increased chances for developing chronic and painful conditions such as peripheral neuropathy.

The reason for this is, all of the things we have talked about today will affect how the nervous system processes energy—leading to the development of peripheral neuropathy.

Wherever possible, helping to restore energy efficiency to nerve cells can make a tremendous difference in many patients with peripheral neuropathy.

And that is why our treatment program includes better nutrition and body motion—and therapies such as neurostimulation, laser, and physical therapy, often with nutritional supplementation.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Good Neuropathy Treatment is All About Energy

What makes for good neuropathy treatment? It all comes down to efficiency and energy improvements of your nerves.

We spoke previously about the theory behind good neuropathy treatments and systems. In fact, our company NeuropathyDR has been a pioneer in this area.

But what makes for good neuropathy treatment?

It all comes down to efficiency and energy improvements of your nerves. You see, many forms of peripheral neuropathy develop when our nerve cells no longer function properly. We used to think the nerve cells simply die.

In some cases, like genetic disease, toxic chemicals, or severe injury, this is true. In these cases, neuropathy recovery is minimal or impossible. But the good news is, for many patients, nerve cells are not dead, but simply damaged, and may be nursed back to health.

But how do we do this?

After very careful evaluation and oversight, and by treating using three simultaneous neuropathy treatment methods.

The first is improving energy efficiency (metabolism) with special diets, supplements, and correcting any underlying thyroid, diabetic, or other medical issues. These alone, in many cases, can have a tremendous impact on the outcome of your neuropathy treatment. Likewise, if these are left uncorrected, any neuropathy treatment is likely to fail.

The second part is improving biomechanics or skeletal function.

Many times, adults suffer from conditions like arthritis, disc injuries and even old athletic injuries that impair motion, ultimately limiting circulation to vital tissues, including nerves. Improving overall circulation and muscle and joint function is critical to patients that suffer from peripheral neuropathy.

The third part is the direct application of energy-stimulating treatments. In the clinic, these can include laser therapy, LED light therapy, as well as various forms of manipulation, massage, nerve stimulation, and possibly even acupuncture.

But the key to good neuropathy treatment is making sure that everything that needs to be done is taken care of in precisely the right order, and time. It is also critical that home care treatment takes place and supports everything that takes place in the clinic.

As you can see, these treatment programs require considerable attention to detail.

In mild cases of peripheral neuropathy, lifestyle and dietary shifts with appropriate home care alone may facilitate recovery.

But in many cases, good neuropathy treatment is only possible with the assistance of a dedicated healthcare professional.

That is after all, why we are here.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Sensory vs. Motor Neuropathy

Spend any time on the Internet, and you would think that all neuropathies are the same. Nothing could be further from the truth actually.

Neuropathy is actually a group of disorders; some are relatively simple, some extraordinarily complex. So we strongly recommend that in addition to everything you can do at home, you put a true neuropathy professional in charge of your care. A neuropathy professional can help you understand the type of neuropathy you have, and how best to treat it.

Sensory vs. Motor Neuropathy

Let’s spend a little time talking about the differences between sensory and motor neuropathy. Sensory neuropathy is just as it sounds—that is, neuropathy where patient experience issues related to sensation. For example, patients with a sensory neuropathy may have decreased sensation, commonly described as numbness—or increased sensation such as burning, tingling, and pain.

Other patients will have simply a loss of sensation. Too often, related to loss of sensation, is the experience of losing one’s balance. As you know, this can be devastating to the neuropathy patient.

The most common forms of neuropathy are largely sensory. This includes early diabetic neuropathy, most chemotherapy-related neuropathy, and those due to metabolic syndrome.

In motor neuropathy, there is a loss of muscle power, and often muscle size and strength. As the name suggests, motor neuropathy can be accompanied by significant weakness.

As a general rule, motor neuropathies are serious, and more difficult to treat. A certain portion of motor neuropathies may be genetic in nature, and can be very difficult to diagnose.

Some motor neuropathy can be the result of serious infections, like Lyme disease, and represent true medical emergencies.

Although frustrating to both patients and doctors alike, a totally accurate diagnosis in some cases of motor neuropathy is impossible—or to do so would involve very expensive genetic testing.

Regardless of the cause of your underlying neuropathy, we feel that good self-treatment is essential.

Cases that have been labeled as hopeless sometimes show improvement with proper nutrition, good physical therapy, and appropriate neurostimulation techniques.

Even in genetic cases of neuropathy, where nerve function is impaired, patients sometimes will sometimes respond to energy simulation techniques, including appropriate supplements like CoQ10.

This is why we strongly recommend that in addition to everything you can do at home, you put a true neuropathy professional in charge of your care.

It will make a big difference in your outcome.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

More on Physical Activity and Your Neuropathy Treatment

Why is physical activity so important for good neuropathy treatment? For several reasons—but most importantly, to increase blood flow to tissue which is only accomplished by regular movement.

If you’re reading this, there’s no doubt you already understand how difficult it can be to exercise with chronic pain, especially neuropathy.

However, if you are a reader of this column you also understand the importance of being as physically active as possible, every single day.

So what I would like to do today is point out some of the simple steps that have worked for our patients, and share them with you.

The most important thing is to take a hard look at your lifestyle, and start to add additional physical activity wherever possible. Believe me, as I’ve said before, if you are recovering from a severe bout with neuropathy, illness, or surgery this may simply mean getting out of bed and up to the bathroom more often.

But let me ask you this: during the course of your day, do you commonly get in your car to take short trips to places you could walk to instead? Even if this means you take somebody with you.

Likewise, when you have the opportunity to take an elevator or stairs, do you choose the stairs? You can, if you need to, go much more slowly then usual and hold on to the hand rails.

You are still far better off exercising the large muscles of your body whenever possible, than not.

Why is this so important for good neuropathy treatment? For several reasons—but most importantly, to increase blood flow to tissue which is only accomplished by regular movement.

Only by keeping your blood vessels dilated can you expect to make as much progress as possible. Yes, good neuropathy treatment is a task. But when the results are successful, you’ll never go back to old ways again.

To pull this off successfully this also mandates good pain management at home, excellent nutrition, and regular visits with your healthcare professional.

Doing all these things together can produce extraordinary neuropathy treatment results for so many patients!

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.