prevent acute pains from becoming chronic

Chronic Pain Answers?

 How To Prevent Acute Pain from Becoming Chronic Pain

PT Dumbell Pink 300x199 Chronic Pain Answers?Right now, this is a staggering statistic: one fourth of the population in United States suffers from some form of chronic pain. Unlike acute or short-term pain, chronic pain is difficult to treat requiring much more effort, resources, and is more expense than acute pain.

Even more amazing is that of these hundred million plus people a substantial number of people suffer from pain related to neuropathy, shingles, and other nerve related painful disorders or neuralgias. All of these belong to the family of chronic conditions called neuropathic pain.

But why is this? There are no simple answers. Bad things do happen to good people every day.

But two largely preventable causes of neuropathy and related conditions do stand out.

The first is that as a society, we pay less attention to our health on the whole than ever before. This of course is a lifestyle issue that we address here every single day.

The other issue, which is better known, is the failure of both patients and their professionals to manage acute pain correctly.

You see, pain that accompanies largely correctable causes that does not go away in a reasonable period of time can turn into the menace called chronic pain.

But there are some simple things that you can do that will prevent acute pains from becoming chronic.

The most important thing is to learn to treat new symptoms seriously. A good rule of thumb is to never ignore anything that persists more than two days or keeps you awake at night.

This will only serve to heighten the possible risk of developing a chronic or much more serious underlying condition. These can also be the signs that infection, inflammation, or other serious process is at work.

One other very important point that could prevent many acute pain cases from turning chronic,

Be sure that any injuries, accidents and any acute illness is treated appropriately.This often means early and active intervention on both the part of yourself and your healthcare professionals.

As inconvenient and time-consuming as this may sometimes be to treat acute health problems, it’s imperative that we in healthcare get the message out.

Initiating good early treatment, diagnostics and appropriate home care programs could save many from chronic pain and all the disability and life disruption that it brings with it.

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Contact a NeuropthyDR Specialist To Help You With The Best Pain Control Available!

The Best Pain Control

For the best pain control, first your clinician must make an accurate assessment of the type of pain and likely causes.

 

PT Electrodes 300x199 The Best Pain ControlAnybody who suffers from neuropathy and it’s related forms of chronic pain such as shingles, pinched nerves in the spine, or even spinal stenosis understands what a challenge finding the best pain control can be.

But what too many physicians and patients very often fail to understand is that early and active intervention to make a dramatic difference in patient outcome.

Let’s take for example back pain. It is been known for years that under-treated acute back pain can lead to prolonged episodes of pain and disability.

Neuropathy is often times the same because of early on the symptoms are minimized or blown off by both patients and doctors alike.

One thing that even too many physicians fail to understand is that different body parts generate different pain signals and this requires often times multiple and even separate forms of treatment.

For example the pain that is produced when a nerve is damaged is distinctly different from the pain from Norcott scraper, even a surgical scar.

Because these are two different problems, they often times need to be treated differently.

One of the key things to understand about neuropathic pain is that it does often respond well to various forms of electric nerve stimulation. This is why so many find relief with our NDGen at home and in the clinic.

By contrast, pain due to bruises, scars, and cuts etc. Do not always respond to direct neurostim (nerve stimulation) and other treatment modalities, such as ultrasound and laser maybe much more effective.

So this is why it’s very important that your clinician make an accurate assessment as to the type of pain you may have and what the likely causes actually are for best pain control.

As we said before the longer a pain pattern sets in the more difficult it becomes to treat.

This is why we strongly recommend active and early intervention especially in painful disorders like neuropathy, shingles and even acute back pain.

The longer you wait or put off the appropriate treatment the more difficult it will become to manage and find the best pain control.

In reality, far more difficult than it needs to be.

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Arachnoiditis Treatment -Get Started Today!

Arachnoiditis Treatment

Is There Arachnoditis Treatment?

 

Older Couple Dumbells 300x199 Arachnoiditis TreatmentLast time we spent some considerable time together overviewing what Arachnoiditis is and what its possible and even most likely causes are. We also spoke about how it’s very much a growing problem. Awareness of arachnoiditis treatment is another problem.

This is one condition in which there is no one single good treatment, there is not a pill you could take to simply make the problem just go away. Unfortunately, it’s much more complicated.

However, these are also the types of problems that good clinicians who are experienced with the treatment approaches that we teach and advocate, will tackle and work diligently with! Meanwhile we are researching options of care, which potentially hold the most promise. Arachnoiditis treatment includes laser and applications of neurostim applied with oral and topical (skin cream) nutrients and anti-inflammatory compounds.

This does follow exactly the same pathway that Neuropathy treatment was in, 10 years ago. Now with the combination of the NDGen, various laser, light therapies, and good physical therapy, a combination of these procedures are able to get patients better results more than ever before.

Admittedly, the applications of these similar procedures for arachnoiditis patients, is in its infancy. We feel strongly however that there is good potential for better life quality and pain reduction without more drugs, injections, or invasive procedures. Time of course, coupled with good studies will tell.

But here’s what you can do now to start, talk to one of our clinicians’ who has experience with our systems and also works with me personally. This of course would only be one of our NeuropathyDR Specialists.

Every patient is different so unfortunately some will not be candidates for care.

But by working together we can develop more effective care plans for this unfortunately growing family of patients.

So welcome to the NeuropathyDR Family! Understand that we will do our very best to help you!

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Arachnoiditis? Contact a NeuropathyDR Treatment Center

Arachnoiditis

Arachnoiditis is a growing but Unfortunately Rarely Discussed Topic.

Doc w Elderly Lady in Bed 300x196 Arachnoiditis

 

Today I would like to introduce you to what arachnoiditis is, how patients get it and what the possible solutions are.

As you probably know the brain and nervous system are bathed in fluid and surrounded by gentle membranes. These membranes help to protect and nourish the brain, spinal cord, and the beginnings of the nerve roots.

It is a very delicate and intricate system.

Everyone has heard of meningitis and you probably know that this is an inflammation of the meninges primarily surrounding the brain and possibly the neck, which causes headache, fever, significant illness and possibly death. It is caused by variety of bacteria and viruses primarily.

Now meningitis typically affects the brain, arachnoiditis affects the spinal cord primarily in the low back area. The most common causes of meningitis that we see in our society are those which result from surgery, invasive diagnostics, which in slang are referred to as “spinal taps”.

Our biggest concern is that there are a growing number of arachnoiditis cases and the fact that more, instead of less invasive procedures including spinal injections and surgeries are being formed.

Before we go any further let’s be clear.

As we say repeatedly here, good health care is always about risks versus benefits. So if you or a loved one needs an invasive spinal procedure to save your life or limb, so be it, it is the best use of medical care.

My concern is when these invasive procedures are done prior to or whenever possible instead of noninvasive procedures.

A prime example is treating chronic back pain using spinal injections as an almost first-line therapy, which has exploded in recent years. Too often, these injections are recommended and used before appropriate conservative and noninvasive therapy like chiropractic care, and other safe and inexpensive modalities like laser, TENS, and NDgen® etc.

When the linings of the spinal cord or the meninges are pierced or broken as with a needle, especially when drugs as well as the preservatives or possible contaminants they contain, arachnoiditis may be the end result. After surgery inflammation, and even allergic reactions to drugs or preservatives used in these drugs during surgery can also set the stage for scaring and adhesion of these tissues.

The net result can be effects which may vary from mild pain to brutal unrelenting pain combined with other signs of nerve damage including weakness and possibly paralysis.

Again my biggest concern is when spinal injections are performed instead of using procedures whenever possible.

We are NOT talking about life-saving procedures and cases in which there is no alternative to surgery or injections.

NEXT TIME WE’LL TALK MUCH MORE ABOUT THIS AND WHAT OPTIONS FOR TREATMENT MAY BE AVAILABLE.

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Postherpetic Neuropathy: Nutrition and Diet Plan

Postherpetic Neuropathy (Pain After Shingles)

A NeuropathyDR specialist is here to help you with your Postherpetic Neuropathy Including nutrition and diet plan.

close up pommegranate citrus salad1 300x200 Postherpetic Neuropathy (Pain After Shingles)

When you were diagnosed with shingles, you thought that as soon as the rash disappeared you would be free and clear…

You didn’t count on the nerve damage and pain you’re still dealing with.

The pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

You’re frustrated…depressed…irritable.

Yes, you know you can take pain medications to help ease some of the discomfort but you don’t want to do that forever.

The good news is that there are other things you can do to help your body heal.  With a little patience, perseverance and the help of medical professionals well versed in dealing with postherpetic neuropathy, like your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, you can live a normal life again.

It Starts With Good Nutrition

The human body is a very well designed machine.  If you put junk into it, you get junk out of it.  But if you give it what it needs to function properly and to repair itself, the results can be awe inspiring.

The very first thing you need to do is make sure you’re giving your body the right tools to fight back against postherpetic neuropathy.  And that means a healthy diet.

Your diet should include[1]:

-           Whole grains and legumes to provide B vitamins to promote nerve health.  Whole grains promote the production of serotonin in the brain and will increase your feeling of well-being.

-           Fish and eggs for additional vitamins B12 and B1.

-           Green, leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, and other greens) for calcium and magnesium.   Both of these nutrients are vital to healthy nerve endings and health nerve impulse  transmission and, as an added bonus, they give your immune system a boost.

-           Yellow and orange fruits and vegetables (such as squash, carrots, yellow and orange bell  peppers, apricots, oranges, etc.) for vitamins A and C to help repair your skin and boost  your immune system.

-           Sunflower seeds (unsalted), avocados, broccoli, almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, peanuts (unsalted), tomatoes and tomato products, sweet potatoes and fish for vitamin E to promote skin health and ease the pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

-           Ask your neuropathy specialist for recommendations on a good multivitamin and mineral supplement to fill in any gaps in your nutrition plan.

Foods you should avoid[2]:

-           Coffee and other caffeinated drinks.

-           Fried foods and all other fatty foods.  Fatty foods suppress the immune system and that’s the last thing you need when you’re fighting postherpetic neuropathy.

-           Cut back on animal protein.  That’s not to say you should become a vegetarian.  Just limit the amount of animal protein you take in.  High-protein foods elevate the amount of  dopamine and norepinephrine which are both tied to high levels of anxiety and stress.

-           Avoid drinking alcohol.  Alcohol consumption limits the ability of the liver to remove toxins from the body and can make a bad situation worse.

-           Avoid sugar.  You don’t have to eliminate sweets completely, just control them.  Sugar contains no essential nutrients and “gunks up” your system.  Keeping your blood sugar level constant will help control your irritability.

-           Control your salt intake.  Opt for a salt substitute with potassium instead of sodium and stay away from preserved foods like bacon, ham, pickles, etc.  Reducing the amount of  salt you eat will help ease inflammation and that alone will work wonders in the healing process.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ treatment specialist for a personalized diet plan to help you to help your body to heal with the right nutritional support for postherpetic neuropathy.

Give Your Body A Break by Managing Stress

We all know that stress is a killer.  But few of us really take steps to manage the stress in our lives.  By keeping your stress level under control, you give your body a chance to use the resources it was using to deal with stress to actually heal itself.

Some tips for managing your stress level:

-           Exercise regularly.  You don’t have to get out and run a marathon.  Just walk briskly for about 15 minutes a day, every day, to start.  You can build from there.

-           Employ relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, tai chi, yoga or meditation.  Any of these will calm the mind and, in turn, calm the body and nerves.

-          Find a hobby that will take your mind off your pain.
Ask your local NeuropathyDR™ clinician for suggestions and make stress management a part of your treatment plan to overcome postherpetic neuropathy. But remember, healing is a process not an event.  Be patient with yourself and start the healing process today.

We hope this gives you some tips to get started on the road to putting postherpetic neuropathy behind you.  Working with your medical team, including your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, to design a nutrition and treatment plan tailored to your specific needs is a great place to start.

For more information on recovering from shingles and postherpetic neuropathy, get our Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy”.


[1] http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/default.htm

[2] http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/sdisease/shingles/shingles.html

NDGen Nerve Stimulation For Chemotherapy Neuropathy Treatment

Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part II

Your local NeuropathyDR® specialist can help you understand Chemotherapy Neuropathy Treatments

 

ndgenkit6 300x228 Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part IILast time, we talked about some therapies that can help alleviate chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The precise combination of these complementary therapies in NeuropathyDR® protocol can bring relief from your peripheral neuropathy and put you back on the road to a full life.

Nutrition

As a cancer patient, you’re already familiar with the effects chemotherapy and other treatments can have on your digestive system. The side effects of cancer treatment can not only affect your ability to eat but they can also prevent your body from getting the nutrition you need to heal.

If you have cancer, you need to make sure you’re getting enough nutrients to prevent or reverse nutritional shortfalls, lessen the side effects of treatment and improve your quality of life.

If at all possible, you need to make sure you’re eating enough high calorie, high-protein foodto give your body proper nutrition. But sitting down and eating a big meal may not be possible. Try eating small meals or snacks frequently instead. Frequent small meals will give your body a steady supply of nutrients, be easier for your sensitive digestive system to handle and maintain a consistent blood sugar level. All of this will often make you feel much better.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician to discuss a meal plan that will give your body what it needs to repair the damage done by cancer treatment. Good nutrition will boost your immune system and let it do its job in fighting off illnesses brought on by the damage of chemotherapy.

NeuropathyDR® practitioners often use diet plans and our nutrition guidelines to complement their chiropractic and NDGen treatment protocols to treat the whole patient from the inside out.

Nerve Stimulation (Neurostimulation or NeuroStim)

Once a NeuropathyDR® course of treatment has been designed and a nutrition plan established, the final piece in the overall treatment of your post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy treatment plan is nerve stimulation.

There are several nerve stimulation techniques to help peripheral neuropathy patients. Our protocol that is having great success includes the NDGen Family of Neurostimulation Devices.

By employing electrical stimulation to the nerves, in a wave-like low frequency motion the nerves may be stimulated to heal wherever possible. This specialty treatment allows the nerves to communicate more normally again and that, in itself, seems to start the process of reversing some damage of peripheral neuropathy.

You may watch our Cancer Patients speak out at http://YouTube.com/NeuropathyDoctor

The combination of good NeuropathyDR® in-clinic care, nutrition and NDGen nerve stimulation and Laser/LED Therapy is showing great promise in helping post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients return to a pain free life, without the debilitating effects of post-chemotherapy peripheral  neuropathy.

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Are You Suffering From Chemotherapy Neuropathy? Let Us Help!

Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part I

Are you suffering from

chemotherapy neuropathy?

Let a NeuropathyDR® specialist help you today!

distressedlady 300x225 Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part I

 

You could be suffering from peripheral neuropathy caused by the very same drugs that saved your life.

If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, your diagnosis was just the beginning of a long battle…

Surgery…

Chemotherapy…

Radiation…

Hormone therapy…

These are all weapons in your fight against a dreaded disease.

But what you may not have realized is that these treatments, especially chemotherapy, can have some serious side effects. Side effects in addition to the nausea, hair loss, etc., that first come to mind. If you’ve completed your chemotherapy treatment and you’re now suffering from:

  • Tingling and/or burning in your hands and/or feet
  • Pain in your nerves
  • Loss of the sense of touch or an inability to feel vibration
  • Temperature changes in the flesh –extremities that are excessively warm or cold
  • Side effects from pain medication that cause insomnia or difficulty staying asleep

You could be suffering from peripheral neuropathy caused by the very same drugs that saved your life.

The good news is that your peripheral neuropathy can be treated. Many chemotherapy neuropathy patients are finding relief with combined therapies of

  • Specialized NeuropathyDR® Treatment Center Care
  • Nutrition Therapy
  • Nerve stimulation therapy, such as the NDGen Family of Devices
  • Laser and LED (LLLT)

The precise combination of these complementary therapies in NeuropathyDR® protocol can bring relief from your peripheral neuropathy and put you back on the road to a full life.

To understand the effectiveness and importance of these complementary therapies in treating your post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy, it helps to understand each piece of the therapy “puzzle”…

Manual Therapy by a Trained Professional

Chances are very good that if, in your pre-cancer life, you never suffered a sports injury or some other type of injury or accident, you may have never been treated by a highly trained chiropractor or physical therapist who uses specialty neuropathy care.

Traditionally, these professionals have diagnosed and treated injuries and illnesses affecting the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints. By employing a gentle manipulation of the spine and other joints, our professionals will assist your body in healing itself.

We use exercises, and manual manipulation of your joints and muscles to help realign the spine and put your bones and joints back into more natural movement.

Cancer patients are increasingly turning to chiropractors and physical therapists as their team to alleviate pain and the stress of not only their cancer but also the side effects resulting from their course of treatment. While this cannot prevent or cure cancer, it can help you deal with the symptoms and pain associated with cancer. By addressing a healthy spine and joints, proper treatment promotes a healthy nervous system and that’s a basic building block for regaining your pre-cancer health.

Your local NeuropathyDR® practitioner is a highly trained specialist and can design a personalized program around your needs to treat your peripheral neuropathy symptoms.

Next time, we’ll talk about nutrition therapy and nerve stimulation. Join the conversation and share your experience on our Facebook page.

Your Neuropathy and Diabetis Nutrition Plans Should Include a Dairy Free Diet

Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy

Diabetes and neuropathy nutrition should include a dairy free diet

almonds heart shaped 300x250 Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy

There is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. Significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

In one of our recent articles, we spent some substantial time talking about dairy consumption, and its negative effects on human health. As I said previously, these are not popular statements—but so be it.

The fact of the matter is, the scientific evidence is overwhelming. Human beings are probably far better without dairy consumption than with it.

What you may not be aware of is there is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. You may know, significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

Also, dairy contains insulin-like growth factor which is a promoter of several different cancers, including breast and prostate cancer. Even stronger is the connection between a particular milk sugar called galactose and the development of ovarian cancer.

But more than this, 50% or more of the population has difficulty digesting milk. It is responsible for allergies, indigestion, as well as elevation in cholesterol and so-called “bad” fats.

All politics aside, let’s help the consumer understand the link between milk consumption and health. We often find that patients who do a dairy and gluten-free diet have significant reductions in both pain and inflammation.

Of course, this influences many patients with neuropathy, and, indeed, many forms of chronic pain.

The simplest way to make a dietary shift is to do so gradually. Give yourself time to explore alternatives such as almond, coconut, and rice-based products.

Like everything else, some are far better than others. Be careful of any product with added sugars. Also, many patients find thickeners such as carrageenan to be very irritating to the G.I. tract.

Of course, I encourage you to do your own research—do your homework. Unfortunately, the influence of the dairy industry is very wide. The spillover into classic nutrition, in which I was trained, is also great.

Keep in mind: in a short period of time, you could know more about dairy and human health than your doctor.

So what’s the answer? Share with them. Provide them a copy of The China Study.

Above all, remain diligent to other dietary assaults. They have a tremendous impact upon your health, well-being—and, yes, your neuropathy!

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Your Neuropathy Nutrition Should Include Vitamin D

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin D

Your Neuropathy Nutrition and Diet Should include Vitamin D

Yes, and this essential vitamin has a role in many other disorders too. Vitamin D is a key nutrient, responsible for many essential functions in human body.

What’s the Connection?

Perhaps the most significant functions are maintenance of bone mass and a powerful immune system. The more recent research suggests many additional roles for this key nutrient. We now know that when Vitamin D levels are low, widespread aches and pains plus more illnesses like flus and colds are common.

Yes, and maybe even neuropathy, both directly and indirectly.

Regarding infections, some researchers suggest we should be heading out vitamin D tablets as opposed to flu shots as they probably would be so much more effective, with minimal side effects.

But that’s another story for another time.

The neuropathy Vitamin D connection probably is because Vitamin D is necessary for the body to manufacture some key neurotropic factors.

Neurotropins as they are often called are substances produced by the body to help nerves repair, and whenever possible regenerate.

There are a number different things that can influence your own neurotropin production, including key nutrition components and therapies like low-frequency nerve stimulation.

In fact, the research is so significant here I am “bullish” on neurostimulator kits being tried for most neuropathy and pain patients.

This is why our homecare kits have become a very popular choice and work well the vast majority of the time. If you are new to Beating Neuropathy can find these at NeuropathyDR

So how much vitamin D is enough?

Well, United States says around 600 international units per day is fine, but European countries recommend levels much higher, on the order of a few thousand international units per day for most healthy adults.

So who is correct? I would definitely side with Europeans on this because research supports that most people do not get nearly enough vitamin D either from their diet, or sunlight exposure.

Personally, I recommend a minimum of 2500 units of supplemental Vitamin D per day combined with The NeuropathyDR Diet.

There are unfortunately no good plant sources of active vitamin D. (cholecaliferol).

The best dietary sources of vitamin D come from fish and fish oils.

But the most important advice I will leave you with today is to have your baseline levels of vitamin D checked, you and your healthcare providers must then determine the most optimum dosage for YOU!

Retest after the first 90 days to make sure your body is absorbing this key neuropathy nutrient properly.

You also need to be very careful because vitamin D can be toxic in very large amounts.

To learn more, check back with us frequently as we will update you periodically as the research indicates.

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NeuropathyDR Specialists Are Here to Help Manage Your Chronic Pain

Chronic Pain Management

Let a NeuropathyDR® Specialist help you with chronic pain management today!

mail.google.com  Chronic Pain Management

Unfortunately, no one medication or therapy is usually the answer once chronic pain has set in. With narcotics, each successive dose becomes less effective than the previous, setting up the pathway for overdose and abuse.

I read a rather frightening statistic this morning that stated that deaths due to narcotic medications are at an all time high.

Unfortunately, this trend will not be reversed unless different steps are taken to manage the vast numbers of chronic pain and neuropathy patients in the world who suffer.

We’ve spoken extensively in the past about the two most common forms of pain. Most of us are very familiar with acute pain that is the pain of a cut, bruise, or even childbirth.

Fortunately, acute pain is relatively short-lived, and not imprinted firmly upon our nervous systems.

Chronic pain however has a way of becoming deeply embedded and tripped very easily, setting up deep circuits within the brain and nervous system, which can be difficult to change.

Unfortunately, no one medication or therapy is usually the answer once chronic pain has set in. With narcotics, each successive dose becomes less effective than the previous, setting up the pathway for overdose and abuse.

The best alternative is to first jump on any new injury or illness with pain as soon as possible. It is vital with any new condition or injury to reduce pain quickly, and as much as possible with non-drug methods.

This is why seeking therapy soon after injury or onset of a condition like shingles or neuropathy–or even headaches and back pain–can produce much better long-term treatment results!

This is also the time to use powerful non-drug treatment methods, including physical therapy modalities such as massage and manual therapy, and various forms of electric neurostimulation–and even laser therapy.

The most important take away from this discussion is to use every non-drug tool available as soon after the onset of injury or illness as possible.

This helps explain why our NeuropathyDR NDGen kits can be so very powerful in helping avoid drug dependence.

In summary, anything you can learn to do to better manage your neuropathy and chronic pain with non-drug methods will lead to a far better long term outcome!

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Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

Your Neuropathy Nutrition Should include Vitamin B3

Fotolia 39693338 M 188x300 Neuropathy Nutrition: Vitamin B3

 

Vitamin B3, or niacin, is a nutrient that, like all vitamins, is essential to health, life and neuropathy nutrition. Vitamin B3 helps our bodies convert food into energy, burn fat properly, and is largely responsible for helping us feel energized!

Did you know that vitamin B3 is a common ingredient in energy drinks? The reason for this is simple. Without vitamin B3, or niacin, our body is unable to function. For many patients, it is lacking due to poor diet. Consuming a diet high in processed foods is likely to be low in niacin. Consuming alcohol can also lower vitamin B3 levels too.

In the neuropathy clinic, mild deficiencies of niacin are probably relatively common. Mild deficiencies probably show up in the neuropathy clinic as slowed metabolism.

Also very common are low levels of niacin, causing a decrease in tolerance to cold. This occurs in neuropathy and chronic pain patients too!

Niacin deficiency can cause the disease called pellagra. Pellagra is disease characterized by the three D’s: diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia.

In very severe niacin deficiencies, significant changes occur to the nervous system. These changes can show up as psychiatric symptoms and, as we mentioned earlier, dementia or brain disease.

More commonly, especially in modern society, are lower levels of niacin then are optimal, making worse some very common neuropathy treatment conditions, including high cholesterol and metabolic syndrome.

A proper neuropathy nutrition diet should include a good food sources of niacin include chicken, beef, and fish including tuna, salmon, and halibut. Many nuts are also high in niacin. Avocado and shiitake mushrooms are also high in niacin. Vitamin B3 as niacinamide is also a common ingredient in many multivitamins and other dietary supplements.

Since niacin is available in two different common forms (niacin and niacinamide), we recommend patients consume both forms in the same supplement.

The reason for this is they will tend to act somewhat differently, both having beneficial effects.

Measuring vitamin B3 levels requires a little more work than a simple blood test. Blood tests for niacin are often unreliable, so special urine tests need to be performed.

Like so many nutrients, it is important to remember that diet must be the number one method of obtaining proper nutrition. It is also critical to understand that each nutrient is just like a key instrument in a symphony.

And just like a symphony does not work when one instrument does not play properly, the same is true in nutrition–especially with neuropathy nutrition!

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Start a Proper Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet Plan Today!

Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet

Get Started on a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan today!

Fotolia 41513033 XS 287x300 Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet. You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage.

One of the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12. Fight neuropathy by eating foods like meat, fish, and eggs that are all high in B vitamins. If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry! There are many kinds of fortified cereals that contain substantial amounts of B vitamins as well (in addition to supplements, which we’ll talk about in a moment).

The Mayo Clinic recommends a diet high in fruits and vegetables for people who suffer from neuropathy. Fruits and vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy. Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels. If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut fruit and vegetables at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for a neuropathic diet, according to neurology.com. A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy. Breakfast cereals, whole grains, vegetables and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy. Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. A variety of foods—skinless white-meat poultry, legumes, tofu, fish, and low-fat yogurt—are good sources of lean protein. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels. Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, and sardines are good for maintaining levels of Omega-3 acids, healthy fats the body needs but cannot produce on its own.

For specific types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time. For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage. Consult your NeuropathyDR® specialist for the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are eating? The easiest way is to keep a food journal. Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking. Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms! As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy. If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help! Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a nutritionist or qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements can also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration. Supplementing B Vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12, can help regulate your nutrient levels and prevent neuropathy symptoms. Supplementing with fish oil can help replenish Omega-3 fatty acids, which are important if you suffer from type-II diabetes. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult your NeuropathyDR® clinician for specific recommendations.

Contact us if you have any questions about a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan. We can help you find the information you need and put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician who can help you with this and other neuropathy-related questions!

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http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/peripheral-neuropathy/DS00131/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies

http://www.foundationforpn.org/livingwithperipheralneuropathy/neuropathynutrition/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/82184-foods-fight-neuropathy/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/121841-nutrients-neuropathy/

Let a NeuropathyDR® clinician can help you with you autonomic neuropathy.

Got Autonomic Neuropathy?

Let a NeuropathyDR® specialist help you with autonomic neuropathy today.

oldercouple 300x233 Got Autonomic Neuropathy?Do any of these symptoms sound familiar?

∙ Dizziness and fainting when you stand up

∙ Difficulty digesting food and feeling really full when you’ve barely eaten anything

∙ Abnormal perspiration – either sweating excessively or barely at all

∙ Intolerance for exercise – no, not that you just hate it but your heart rate doesn’t adjust as it should

∙ Slow pupil reaction so that your eyes don’t adjust quickly to changes in light

∙ Urinary problems like difficulty starting or inability to completely empty your bladder

If they do, you could have autonomic neuropathy. Especially if you have diabetes, your immune system is compromised by chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, lupus, Guillian-Barre or any other chronic medical condition.

You need to see a doctor immediately. A good place to start would be a physician well versed in diagnosing and treating nerve disease and damage, like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

What Is Autonomic Neuropathy?

Autonomic neuropathy in itself is not a disease[1]. It’s a type of peripheral neuropathy that affects the nerves that control involuntary body functions like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion and perspiration. The nerves are damaged and don’t function properly leading to a break down of the signals between the brain and the parts of the body affected by the autonomic nervous system like the heart, blood vessels, digestive system and sweat glands.

That can lead to your body being unable to regulate your heart rate or your blood pressure, an inability to properly digest your food, urinary problems, even being unable to sweat in order to cool your body down when you exercise.

Often, autonomic neuropathy is caused by other diseases or medical conditions so if you suffer from

∙ Diabetes

∙ Alcoholism

∙ Cancer

∙ Systemic lupus

∙ Parkinson’s disease

∙ HIV/AIDS

Or any number of other chronic illnesses, you stand a much higher risk of developing autonomic neuropathy.[2] Your best course of action is not to wait until you develop symptoms. Begin a course of preventative treatment and monitoring with a NeuropathyDR® clinician to lessen your chances of developing autonomic neuropathy.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Diagnose My Autonomic Neuropathy?

If you have diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDs or any of the other diseases or chronic conditions that can cause autonomic neuropathy, it’s much easier to diagnose autonomic neuropathy. After all, as a specialist in nerve damage and treatment, your NeuropathyDR® is very familiar with your symptoms and the best course of treatment.

If you have symptoms of autonomic neuropathy and don’t have any of the underlying conditions, your diagnosis will be a little tougher but not impossible.

Either way, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will take a very thorough history and physical. Make sure you have a list of all your symptoms, when they began, how severe they are, what helps your symptoms or makes them worse, and any and all medications your currently take (including over the counter medications, herbal supplements or vitamins).

Be honest with your NeuropathyDR® clinician about your diet, alcohol intake, frequency of exercise, history of drug use and smoking. If you don’t tell the truth, you’re not giving your NeuropathyDR® clinician a clear picture of your physical condition. That’s like asking them to drive you from Montreal to Mexico City without a map or a GPS. You may eventually get to where you want to be, but it’s highly unlikely.

Once your history and physical are completed, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will order some tests. Depending upon your actual symptoms and which systems seem to be affected, these tests might include:

∙ Ultrasound

∙ Urinalysis and bladder function tests

∙ Thermoregulatory and/or QSART sweat tests

∙ Gastrointestinal tests

∙ Breathing tests

∙ Tilt-table tests (to test your heart rate and blood pressure regulation)

Once your tests are completed and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determines you have autonomic neuropathy, it’s time for treatment.

Treatment and Prognosis

NeuropathyDR® clinicians are well versed in treating all types of peripheral neuropathy, including autonomic neuropathy. They adhere to a very specialized treatment protocol that was developed specifically for patients suffering from neuropathy. That’s why their treatments have been so successful – neuropathy in all its forms is what they do.

Autonomic neuropathy is a chronic condition but it can be treated and you can do things to help relieve your symptoms.

Your NeuropathyDR® clinician will work with you and your other physicians to treat your neuropathy and manage your underlying condition. They do this through:

∙ Diet Planning and Nutritional Support

You need to give your body the nutrition it needs to heal.

If you have gastrointestinal issues caused by autonomic neuropathy, you need to make sure you’re getting enough fiber and fluids to help your body function properly.

If you have diabetes, you need to follow a diet specifically designed for diabetics and to control your blood sugar.

If your autonomic neuropathy affects your urinary system, you need to retrain your bladder. You can do this by following a schedule of when to drink and when to empty your bladder to slowly increase your bladder’s capacity.

∙ Individually Designed Exercise Programs

If you experience exercise intolerance or blood pressure problems resulting from autonomic neuropathy, you have to be every careful with your exercise program. Make sure that you don’t overexert yourself, take it slowly. Your NeuropathyDR® clinician can design an exercise program specifically for you that will allow you to exercise but won’t push you beyond what your body is capable of. And, even more importantly, they will continually monitor your progress and adjust your program as needed.

∙ Lifestyle Modifications

If your autonomic neuropathy causes dizziness when you stand up, then do it slowly and in stages. Flex your feet or grip your hands several times before you attempt to stand to increase the flow of blood to your hands and feet. Try just sitting on the side of your bed in the morning for a few minutes before you try to stand.

Change the amount and frequency of your meals if you have digestive problems.

Don’t try to do everything all at once. Decide what really needs to be done each day and do what you can. Autonomic neuropathy is a chronic disorder and living with any chronic condition requires adaptations. Your NeuropathyDR® clinician knows this all too well and will work with you to manage your level of stress and change your daily routines to help you manage your condition and your life.

All of these changes in conjunction with medications, where needed, will make it easier to live with autonomic neuropathy and lessen the chances of serious complications. Early intervention with a NeuropathyDR® clinician is still the best policy if you have any of the underlying conditions that can cause autonomic neuropathy. But if you already have symptoms, start treatment immediately

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001780/

[2] http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/autonomic-neuropathy/

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Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Make your Neuropathy Treatment Plan Today!

MatureCoupleLaptop 300x200 Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Those who use written neuropathy treatment plans have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

If you or someone you love suffers from peripheral neuropathy, you know how devastating this condition can be. You probably are also aware of the immense life changes a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy can bring.

But the good news is, as you read on these pages repeatedly there is a whole lot you can learn to better deal with your peripheral neuropathy.

This is where having a written neuropathy treatment plan goes along way. In fact you could apply this to almost any illness.

Here’s what to do next:

First of all take out a large piece of paper, or even on mobile phone. Actually, in this stage I am a huge fan of mobile notes sync across all devices.

On your neuropathy treatment plan should first be all your known risk factors. This would include things like cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption, inactivity, and perhaps diabetes. Maybe there are other known factors, such as consumption of medications known to produce peripheral neuropathy.

Once you have your list, then you need to divide it into things that you can change. The very next thing you need to do is to prioritize your neuropathy treatment plan. For example what is having the biggest impact on your health?

This is the very first thing, although perhaps the most difficult that you need to do first.

By first developing a neuropathy treatment plan and then using your own willpower and discipline, along with the help from your family and healthcare professionals, you can do a whole lot to help yourself feel better and function better!

And this really is the entire premise of the Beating Neuropathy family. We are here to help and support you!

What we do know however is those who use written neuropathy treatment plans and not only work off them but share them with their neuropathy treatment specialists have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

To that end, we are here to support you!

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Got Diabetic Neuropathy? Let a NeuropathyDR® specialist help you today!

Got Diabetic Neuropathy?

Got Diabetic Neuropathy? Let one our our highly trained NeuropathyDR® specialists help you today!

mail.google.com  Got Diabetic Neuropathy?

 

 

If you have diabetes and you’re experiencing any of these symptoms:

- Diarrhea, nausea and vomiting

- Difficulty swallowing

- Deep pain, especially in your legs and feet

- Loss of sensation and ability to feel warmth or cold

- Muscle cramps

- Numbness, tingling or burning in your arms, hands, legs or feet

- Weakness

- Dizziness, especially when you try to stand up

- Drooping facial muscles

- Loss of bladder control

You could have diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes. Typically, it’s caused by lack of blood flow to the nerves and elevated and uncontrolled blood sugar levels.

If left untreated, diabetic neuropathy can lead to debilitating nerve damage. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should seek treatment with a medical professional with experience in diagnosing and treating diabetic neuropathy like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

If your NeuropathyDR® specialist determines that you have diabetic neuropathy, it’s vital that you start treatment right away.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Specialist Treat My Diabetic Neuropathy?

The first goal for treatment in diabetic neuropathy is to get your diabetes under control and keep it under control to slow the progression of any nerve damage. That means ensuring that you’re taking any prescribed medications and that you’re eating a diet specific to diabetes control.

A diet specific to diabetes control will include:

- Fresh vegetables

- Fresh fruit

- Lean meats

- High fiber

- Whole grains

- No sweets

Your NeuropathyDR® specialist has an exclusive treatment protocol with proven results for diabetic neuropathy patients. An integral part of that treatment protocol is nutrition counseling and diet planning. Your specialist will sit down with you and plan your meals to include the proper portions of each of these categories on a daily basis to make sure that your blood sugar remains as constant as possible.

Pain Reduction and Nerve Repair

Once you have your blood sugar control, the next part of the treatment protocol for your diabetic neuropathy is taking steps to reduce your symptoms and help the nerves repair themselves. This can be done through a combination of topical pain medications, manual manipulation of the bones and joints to properly align the nervous system and nerve stimulation.

Diet, proper alignment of the bones and muscles and nerve stimulation are all important aspects of successful treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

A Word To The Wise Diabetic Neuropathy Patient

If you are suffering from diabetic neuropathy, pay particular attention to your feet, hands, arms and legs and contact your NeuropathyDR® specialist immediately if you notice any blisters, sores, torn skin, or inflammation. The combination of your diabetes and your diabetic neuropathy can lead to very serious infections that are slow or impossible to heal. This can lead to dire complications that can be avoided if you receive the proper medical treatment early.

Make sure you’re doing a visual inspection and not relying on soreness or pain. Your diabetic neuropathy will impair your ability to feel pain in your extremities and you may not notice the problem until it’s too late for successful treatment.

Assess your current medical situation and take note of any of the symptoms we described. If you are experiencing any of these issues associated with diabetic neuropathy, contact your local NeuropathyDR® and take full advantage of their expertise in the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Got Fibromyalgia? Let Us Help!

Got Fibromyalgia?

Let a NeuropathyDR® clinician help you with your fibromyalgia today!

mail.google.com 1 Got Fibromyalgia?If you suffer from pain, chances are good you’ve heard of fibromyalgia. Nearly 4% of people suffer from fibromyalgia, making it one of the most common pain syndromes in the world! Although women are 70% more likely to suffer from fibromyalgia than men, the condition hits everyone.

Like neuropathy, fibromyalgia can profoundly impact your quality of life, from mobility and strength to living with chronic pain. If you believe you may have fibromyalgia, as with neuropathy, it is important to see a NeuropathyDR® clinician before your symptoms get worse!

Symptoms

The most common indicator of fibromyalgia is pain and sensitivity to pressure on the skin. Most sufferers describe the pain as stabbing and shooting, and it can occur all over the body. Fibromyalgia pain is often worse in the mornings, and can vary based on restlessness and even temperature/humidity.

Neuropathic symptoms very frequently accompany fibromyalgia. If you suffer from the condition, you may also be experiencing tingling in your extremities, numbness, the sensation of clothing running over your skin when none is there, and difficulty determining hot and cold in addition to the telltale pressure-sensitivity. Of course, these symptoms can themselves contribute to other problems, such as sleep disturbance, disruption of appetite, and bladder-control problems.

Causes

The true cause of fibromyalgia is a point of some debate, and has never been decisively established; some researchers even point to the lack of physical abnormalities as evidence that it’s a distinct condition. But modern research has proved this is a very real disorder with fibromyalgia patients having significant differences from others in nervous system function and even brain and spinal cord neurochemistry.There are some other commonly-held theories which include:

Dopamine dysfunction- (brain and spinal cord chemistry) one of the most common theories explains why fibromyalgia is so frequently found in cases where someone suffers from restless leg syndrome and sleeplessness. These are conditions which result in part from insufficient dopamine in a certain part of the body.

Stress- Fibromyalgia shows up frequently in people who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome,post-traumatic stress disorder, fatigue, and depression. This has led many researchers to conclude that there is a distinct link between stress and developing fibromyalgia. The earlier in life the stress occurs the worse this can be! That’s why its important to recognize the symptoms in adolescents and even some children!

Recent research has suggested fibromyalgia may have a genetic component. The disorder is often seen in families, among siblings or mothers and their children.

Physical trauma- Physical trauma can act as a trigger for fibromyalgia, research suggests, since it tends to show up for the first time in many cases where a person is suffering from an acute illness or injury.

Thyroid Disease: It is well known that low and borderline thyroid function is BIG trouble and may be a root cause up to 50% of the time.

PLUS a 2013 study shows that a significant number of Fibromyalgia patients may actually have small fiber Neuropathy! This also explains why so many fibromyalgia patients respond so well to our NeuropathyDR treatment protocols and NDGen Products!

Treatment

Fibromyalgia is traditionally treated with a variety of medications ranging from simple pain relievers, antidepressants, anti-seizure medications, and even dopamine agonists. Since the root cause of fibromyalgia is not entirely understood, treatment with pharmaceuticals alone is a game of trial and error at best. Understandably, this has led many doctors and researchers over the past decade to advocate alternative, non-pharmaceutical treatments.

Some of the more modern methods for fibromyalgia treatment include exercise, cognitive behavior therapy, adjustments to diet and lifestyle, electrotherapy like NDGen, and even massage therapy. Extensive research over the past few years even points to chiropractic and other manual therapies and acupuncture as potential routes for effective treatment.

NeuropathyDR® promotes newer methodologies for treatment, and discourages medications that could be ineffective, temporary fixes, or even lead to additional complications.

Your NeuropathyDR® clinician is an expert in the latest methods of treating the symptoms of your fibromyalgia in ways that are both more effective and more affordable than dated pharmaceutical techniques.

Because everyone who has fibromyalgia experiences different symptoms, it’s very important to have a one-on-one evaluation with someone who really knows the condition. If you’re not seeing a NeuropathyDR® clinician, contact us! We can put you in touch with an expert who can help you find the ideal treatment for your specific case.

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LED Treatments May Help With YOUR Peripheral Neuropathy

LED -Light Therapy and Peripheral Neuropathy

LED may be able to help your peripheral neuropathy.

walk e1401638968649 242x300 LED  Light Therapy and Peripheral Neuropathy

 

LED, or light emitting diodes, have been around for quite some time. In fact, some of their original applications date back to the space program of the 1990s. Light energy is simply particles that can penetrate tissue at selected depths.

According to NASA, LEDs has been utilized as part of cancer treatment.  LED usage has also been approved by the Naval special warfare command. LEDs have also been used for improved wound healing

However, how exactly does this work? Light energy is simply clusters of photons or particles that can penetrate tissue at selected depths. What has been known for centuries is that light speeds healing.  A long time ago, ill patients from infectious disease units and TB wards were rolled out into sunlight daily. Wounds were also exposed to sunlight to heal. {1}

We also know that light therapy does have specific effects. The most important effect of that may have a bearing on peripheral neuropathy and related conditions, is the ability to stimulate metabolism or cellular efficiency.

You see, all the work we have done in the treatment of peripheral neuropathy since 2008 has been focused upon metabolic stimulation.

With the addition of LED also known as light therapy, we are now able to expand our reach and help more patients than ever before. Although the research is early, it is extraordinarily encouraging.

Talk to your clinician about possibly adding LED therapy to your neuropathy treatment. Consider this especially if you suffer from diabetic neuropathy or other poor wound-healing complications. Then Contact one of our NeuropathyDR® clinicians to schedule an appointment for Light therapy at our clinic.

{1} http://sbir.nasa.gov/SBIR/successes/ss/8-035text.html

For more information on coping with your peripheral neuropathy or other forms of chronic pain, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Low level laser therapy.

Laser Therapy For Neuropathy Treatment?

Laser therapy could be the “missing link” in some forms of neuropathy treatment!

725 118 199x300 Laser Therapy For Neuropathy Treatment?Laser has been around since about 1960 or so when a now famous scientist produced these “focused light beams” in the laboratory. Lasers have been used in medicine for many years.

These ultra focused light beams can be used at high intensity to seal tissue, aid surgeons dentists and dermatologists in their daily work with patients. And at lower intensity, they have had applications in physical therapy and neuropathy treatment for some time too.

Now, lasers are everywhere, everything from CD Players, printers and measuring devices to military weapons. I’m sure you may even have seen a few of your own!

So what does laser therapy have to do with neuropathy treatment?

Well, it could be that laser therapy is the “missing link” in some forms of neuropathy treatment!

As we discuss together frequently, no neuropathy treatment works 100 percent of the time. And that is a key point to remember. We also have talked about effective neuropathy treatment being the result of working only with highly trained neuropathy treatment professionals.

And nowhere is this more apparent than in laser treatments for neuropathy. Even amongst laser neuropathy treatment experts there’s often is disagreement as to what makes good neuropathy treatment.

But some techniques in laser, neuropathy treatment equipment are looking very promising!

One of our basic attempts when treating neuropathy is to do what ever can help safely and effectively boost your nerve cells use of “energy”.

Well, along with proper nutrition and electrotherapy, laser may aid energy production in damaged nerves.

The way this may happen is fascinating, but way beyond the scope of this column.

But the good news is more experience and research including our own will help us find even better neuropathy treatments than we have available today!

Always remember though, we go to great lengths every day to be sure your NeuropathyDR Clinician is up to date in the latest, and best forms of neuropathy treatment for you and your family!

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Learn About Diabetic Neuropathy

Do I Have Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes.

diabeticmeter 300x116 Do I Have Diabetic Neuropathy?

 

 

If you have diabetes and you have any of these symptoms[1]:

Diarrhea, nausea and vomiting
Difficulty swallowing
Deep pain, especially in your legs and feet
Loss of sensation and ability to feel warmth or cold
Muscle cramps
Numbness, tingling or burning in your arms, hands, legs or feet
Weakness
Dizziness, especially when you try to stand up
Drooping facial muscles
Loss of bladder control

You could have diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes. If left untreated, diabetic neuropathy can lead to serious and possibly permanent nerve damage.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should seek treatment with a medical professional with experience in diagnosing and treating diabetic neuropathy like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

Why Does Diabetes Cause Neuropathy?

If your blood glucose levels aren’t controlled and have been high for significant period of time, the blood vessels that carry oxygen to your nerves can be damaged. Elevated blood glucose can also damage the sheath that covers and protects the nerves. That leaves them vulnerable to damage. Diabetic neuropathy is just the medical term for the nerve damage caused by elevated blood glucose levels.

What Happens to Your Body Once Those Nerves Are Damaged?

Diabetic neuropathy happens when the nervous system is damaged.

If your peripheral nervous system is damaged you can experience[2]

Numbness in your arms, hands, legs and feet
Inability to feel heat, cold or even pain in your arms, hands, legs and feet
Burning or tingling or even the “pins and needles” feeling you get when your legs or arms “go to sleep”
Changes in the shape of your feet caused by weakened muscles
Carpal tunnel syndrome

If your neuropathy affects your autonomic nervous system, you can experience

Digestive problems like nausea, vomiting, constipation or diarrhea
Erectile dysfunction
Irregular heart beat
Loss of bladder control
Inability to regulate your blood pressure

How Can You Reduce Your Risk of Diabetic Neuropathy?

The best defense against diabetic neuropathy is to get and keep your blood sugar under control. Your best bet for doing that is proper diet, strictly monitoring your blood sugar levels and always taking your diabetes medication as prescribed by your doctor.

A good diet for controlling your blood sugar includes:

Fresh fruit and vegetables
Lean meats
High fiber
Whole grains
No sweets

Your NeuropathyDR® Clinician is a specialist has an exclusive treatment protocol with proven results for diabetic neuropathy patients. An integral part of that treatment protocol is nutrition counseling and diet planning. Your specialist will sit down with you and plan your meals to include the proper portions of each of these categories on a daily basis to make sure that your blood sugar remains as constant as possible.

Assess your current medical situation and take note of any of the symptoms we described. If you are experiencing any of these issues associated with diabetic neuropathy, contact your local NeuropathyDR® and take full advantage of their expertise in the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

[1] www.joslin.org/info/diabetic_neuropathy_nerve_damage_an_update.html

[2] http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/peripheralneuropathy/detail_peripheralneuropathy.html

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Vitamin A

Vitamin A Neuropathy & Health

Vitamin A Is a Key Neuropathy and Health Nutrient

Fotolia 50871321 M 300x199 Vitamin A Neuropathy & Health This key nutrient is responsible in a large part for healthy skin and epithelial cells. Those little guys are the cells, which line our mouth, GI tract and even our lungs.

This is why you now see so many skin lotions and topical drugs with Vitamin A derivatives.

Vitamin A is also needed if or a normal healthy immune system. In fact, during times of infection, I’ll suggest patients take some very large amounts but just for a few days. There are however two serious CAUTIONS! If you are pregnant or of childbearing age you need to know excess Vitamin A is teratogenic, meaning it can cause birth defects. This is why we advise young women take natal only formulas for at least 6 months before conception. These formulas also contain extra Folic acid, which helps prevent birth defects.

The next caution is that excess Vitamin A can be TOXIC If you consume too much and possibly in liver disease. Vitamin A Is one of the fat soluble vitamins, so it hangs around in our bodies a good bit longer than things like most B vitamins. So please work with your own health professionals on dosages for you.

Deficiencies in this key nutrient are more likely in malabsorbtion syndromes and bowel diseases. If you are following the NeuropathDR Diet Plan you should be in good shape, as long as you are consuming lots of leafy green and brightly colored vegetables.

Unfortunately, it’s only beta-carotene not the other caratenoids which have significant pro-vitamin A value. So veggies like carrots are particularly good for this reason.
Retinol is the most active form and is found in meats. This largely depends upon how healthy the animals are we consume.

Because Vitamin A is so critical to immune function it has roles in prevention of infection and probably many cancers as well.

So know you know! Don’t ignore this Key Neuropathy Diet Plan nutrient!

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